The 2017 Sir William Luce Fellowship – Durham University

Sir William Luce Fellowship

The Sir William Luce Memorial Fund will welcome applications, after 9 June, for the position of Sir William Luce Fellow which will commence in April 2017.

The Sir William Luce Memorial Fund was established to commemorate the long and distinguished career of Sir William Luce GBE, KCMG, DL (1907-77) in the Middle East during the era of the transfer of power.

The Fellowship is awarded annually to a scholar at post-doctoral level, diplomat, politician, or business executive, working on those parts of the Middle East to which Sir William Luce devoted his working life (Iran, the Gulf states, South Arabia and Sudan), and is hosted by Durham University during Easter term (24 April – 23 June 2017). The Fund may give some preference to proposals linked to the University’s Sudan Archive (which contains records relating to both Sudan and South Sudan). The Fellowship, tenable jointly in the Institute for Middle Eastern & Islamic Studies and Trevelyan College, entitles the holder to full access to departmental and other University facilities such as the University Library, including the Sudan Archive, and Computing and Information Services. It also carries a grant, accommodation and all meals for the duration of the Fellowship. The Fellow is expected to deliver a lecture on the subject of his or her research which will be designated ‘The Sir William Luce Lecture’, and should be cast in such a way as to form the basis of a paper to be published in a special edition of the Durham Middle East Papers series.

Applicants should send a CV, an outline of their proposed research and contact details for two referees, preferably by e-mail, by Thursday 6 October 2016 to:

The Secretary

Sir William Luce Memorial Fund

Durham University Library

Palace Green

Durham

DH1 3RN

United Kingdom

E-mail: luce.fund@durham.ac.uk

For further information about the Luce Fund see https://www.dur.ac.uk/sgia/imeis/lucefund/

NAPATA program for scientific cooperation between France and Sudan

CEDEJ Khartoum has the pleasure to inform you of the launching of the joint program NAPATA for scientific cooperation between France and Sudan, aiming at supporting the development of bilateral partnerships between academic and research institutions and joint research cooperation projects, and at encouraging mobility of academics and researchers.

The program is run jointly by the French Embassy and the Ministry of Higher Education and Scientific Research of the Republic of Sudan.

Each proposed project should be submitted by a joint French-Sudanese team with two coordinators, French and Sudanese.

Online call for proposal is opened at http://www.campusfrance.org/napata (applications to be filled either in French or in English).

Courtesy translation in Arabic of the call or proposal is available at the Ministry of Higher Education and Scientific Research.

The deadline for online application is 28 July 2016.

Complementary information : jean-noel.baleo@diplomatie.gouv.fr ; abusufian.ali@diplomatie.gouv.fr ; eng_rashid@hotmail.com /eng_rashid@mohe.gov.sd ; siddigomdur@yahoo.com

Ester Serra Mingot’s PhD research on « Transnational Social Protection. How Sudanese migrants in the Netherlands and the United Kingdom and their families in Sudan make use of social protection, locally and transnationally »

CV_picEster Serra Mingot, PhD Candidate at the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences in Maastricht University is currently doing her PhD on « Transnational Social Protection. How Sudanese migrants in the Netherlands and the United Kingdom and their families in Sudan make use of social protection, locally and transnationally ».

In Sudan, CEDEJ Khartoum will support her fieldwork. Continuer la lecture de Ester Serra Mingot’s PhD research on « Transnational Social Protection. How Sudanese migrants in the Netherlands and the United Kingdom and their families in Sudan make use of social protection, locally and transnationally »

CALL FOR PAPERS – Conference « Appropriating Space in Colonial and Imperial contexts », June 12-14th 2017

An  international conference on appropriating  space  in colonial and  imperial contexts will be held at  the Maison méditerranéenne des sciences de  l’homme  (MMSH), Aix-en-Provence, France, on 12-14 June 2017.

Please find the call for papers: in French and in English.

Continuer la lecture de CALL FOR PAPERS – Conference « Appropriating Space in Colonial and Imperial contexts », June 12-14th 2017

Iftar-documentary screening & debate on gender issues in Sudan – « Men as Allies » in CEDEJ Khartoum

CEDEJ Khartoum and the French Embassy in Sudan, in partnership with the NGO SIHA (Strategic Initiative for Women in the Horn of Africa), are pleased to announce the following event:

An iftar-documentary screening & debate !

?????????????

On Wednesday 22nd June, at 7 pm, in CEDEJ Khartoum:

« Men as Allies »
(17 min, 2016)

Images intégrées 2

This short film aims to unravel the multi-layered patriarchal narrative in Sudan, delve into the concept of masculinity and its correlation to that social concept/discourse and to explore the personal experiences of young men regarding their attitudes, stances and behavioral patterns towards oppression, discrimination and violence against women.

 

You are kindly invited to join us for iftar and to participate in this documentary screening & debate on gender issues in Sudan.

We hope to see you there!

THEMATIC RESEARCH GRANTS – CALL FOR APPLICATIONS – British Institute in Eastern Africa (BIEA)

Call for Applications: BIEA Thematic Research Grants

Every year the British Institute in Eastern Africa (BIEA) invites applications for our small Thematic Research Grants. These funds are usually dispersed through two calls for applications per year, usually released in June/July and December. This is the first call for applications in the 2016-7 year. Please pay attention to this webpage in December 2016 for the second grant call and deadline information.

Continuer la lecture de THEMATIC RESEARCH GRANTS – CALL FOR APPLICATIONS – British Institute in Eastern Africa (BIEA)

CEDEJ Khartoum’s research activities on migration

In 2015 and 2016, CEDEJ Khartoum particularly invested in migration issues through different scientific events and the support of several researchers/PhD students’ fieldwork in Sudan.

 

IMG_9604A scientific conference, organized by CEDEJ Khartoum, CFEE in Addis Ababa and the University of Khartoum entitled “Migration and Exile in the Horn of Africa: State of Knowledge and Current Debates” was held in November 2015 in Khartoum: for two days this major event brought together about forty researchers specialized in the field of migrations in the Horn of Africa.

♦♦♦

picture-115Dr Catherine Wihtol de Wenden is a renowned specialist on migration.

During her visit in CEDEJ Khartoum, we screened the documentary « Time to look at girls: migrants in Bangladesh and Ethiopia »(directed by Marco Speroni, 31 minutes – 2015), produced and researched by Katarzyna Grabska, Nicoletta Del Franco and Marina De Regt.

Affiche-film2

♦♦♦

  • Dr Katarzyna Grabska’s field research on patterns of return and displacement movements of South-Sudanese en route to Sudan/Ethiopia as a result of the civil conflict in the South.

In January 2016, CEDEJ Khartoum organized the book launch of her book « Gender, Home & Identity: Nuer repatriation to Southern Sudan » (James Currey, 2014) at the University of Khartoum.cover photo

♦♦♦

  • Film screening/debate about migration in March 2016: “Days of hope”, by the Danish director Ditte Haarlov Johnsen

“DAYS OF HOPE” (2013, 74 min) – Every year thousands of Africans leave their families behind and risk their lives in hope of a better life. “Days of Hope” brings us close to these people, providing an inside look at the struggles these emigrants face.

Dr Kasia GRABSKA and Dr Azza AZIZ, anthropologists with interest in migration issues, lead an after-screening discussion of the film.

♦♦♦

« The border between the Central African Republic and Sudan has always been porous and the Central African’s presence in Darfur is old. However, the migration of Central African in Khartoum seems to be more recent and linked with the troubles since the putsches of François Bozize and Michel Djotodia. This small community has still a low visibility and has not been studied since now. I focus my study on why and how they left the Central African Republic and came into Sudan. I try to find which networks lead them up to Khartoum and help to their integration. I also ask the question of the status of these migrants. This last point reveals a link between the refugees and the students. Actually, the main network for the Central African to integrate them in Khartoum seems to be the International University of Africa. » – Khadidja Medani

♦♦♦

  • Miralyne Zeghnoune’s ongoing fieldwork on Sudanese migrants in France and in Sudan.

Miralyne Zeghnoune, a master student, is currently collecting data on Sudanese migrants’ conditions in France (migratory route, reasons for leaving, future projects, connections with the family in Sudan, etc.). After two-month fieldwork in France (Paris, Lyon, Calais), she will study in Khartoum these migrants’ family and entourage (initial project, administrative procedures, contacts with the migrant, etc.).

♦♦♦

  • Alice Koumurian’s fieldwork on Syrian migrants (after 2011) in Khartoum.

Undeniably, the phenomenon of the increasing flow of Syrians coming to Sudan, resulting from the closing of the Turkish border coupled with the facility of entrance to Sudan due to the fact that they do not need a visa to enter Sudan and permission of stay is not unduly complicated, also requires the collection and analysis of data.

♦♦♦

 

Dr Alice Franck’s presentation on urban agriculture at the Sudanese Institute of Architects (SIA)’s 4th Scientific and Professional conference


On Monday 23rd May, Dr Alice Franck, Geographer and Coordinator of CEDEJ Khartoum, presented her paper « Urban Agriculture Facing Land Pressure in Greater Khartoum – The Case of New Real Estate Projects in Tuti and Abū Seʿīd » at the Sudanese Institute of Architects (SIA)’s 4th Scientific and Professional conference.

Continuer la lecture de Dr Alice Franck’s presentation on urban agriculture at the Sudanese Institute of Architects (SIA)’s 4th Scientific and Professional conference

Revue de presse du CEDEJ du Caire – Le partage des eaux du Nil entre Egypte, Soudan et Ethiopie, par Wahel Rashid

Focus – Le partage des eaux du Nil entre Egypte, Soudan et Ethiopie : revue de presse (1)

dans rubrique Revue de presse – Ressources/Environnement

par Wahel Rashid

Le 23 mars 2015, le premier ministre éthiopien, Hailemariam Desalegn, le président égyptien, Abdel Fattah al-Sissi et le président soudanais Omar el-Béchir, réunis à Khartoum, ont décidé de signer un accord de « principe » afin d’aplanir leurs différends concernant la question du Nil. En effet, depuis 2011, le projet de construction par le gouvernement éthiopien d’un barrage sur le Nil bleu envenime les relations entres les trois Etats. En Egypte, cette question est régulièrement traitée comme une question de sécurité nationale pour le pays puisque 95% de son approvisionnement en eau vient du Nil ; or le Nil bleu contribue à hauteur de 59% du débit total du Nil. Cet événement fut l’occasion d’un échange de « courtoisie » entre les chefs d’Etat éthiopien et égyptien : Hailemariam Desalegn assura que le projet éthiopien ne causerait pas de dommage à l’Egypte, tandis qu’Abdel Fattah al-Sissi annonça que, entre la coopération et le conflit, les trois pays avaient « choisi de coopérer ». Les tensions avaient atteint leur paroxysme en juin 2013 lorsque l’ancien président égyptien, Mohamed Morsi, avait dirigé une réunion au cours de laquelle certains responsables égyptiens avaient suggéré d’utiliser la force armée pour régler la question du barrage Renaissance en Ethiopie. Le barrage Renaissance (GERD en anglais pour Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam) qui doit être opérationnel en 2017 promet d’être la plus grande structure hydroélectrique d’Afrique avec une production de 6000 mégawatts par an. Le coût prévu pour ces travaux est de 4,5 milliards d’euros entièrement financés par l’Ethiopie et ses citoyens à travers un emprunt obligataire national.
Continuer la lecture de Revue de presse du CEDEJ du Caire – Le partage des eaux du Nil entre Egypte, Soudan et Ethiopie, par Wahel Rashid

Katarzyna Grabska wins Amaury Talbot Prize for African Anthropology

We are extremely pleased to announce that Katarzyna Grabska, associate researcher at CEDEJ Khartoum, recently won the 2014 Amaury Talbot Prize for African Anthropology for her book Gender, Home and Identity: Nuer Repatriation to Southern Sudan (Boydell & Brewer Ltd 2014).

Katarzyna Grabska’s conference in AUC on May 16th – « Gender, Home & Identity: Nuer Repatriation to Southern Sudan »


Center for Migration and Refugee Studies
Seminar Series
« Gender, Home & Identity: Nuer Repatriation to Southern Sudan »
 
How and where did returning Nuer refugees make their ‘homes’ in South Sudan? How were gender relations and identity redefined as a result of war, displacement and return to post-war communities? And how were those displaced able to recreate sense of home, community and nation?
During the civil wars in Southern Sudan (1983-2005) many of the displaced Sudanese, including many Nuer, were in refugee camps in Kenya and Ethiopia. In the aftermath of the Comprehensive Peace Agreement, they repatriated to Southern Sudan. Faced with finding long-lost relatives and local expectations of ‘proper behaviour’, they often felt displaced again.
In this presentation, Grabska will present the findings of her recent book in which she  followed the lives of a group of Nuer in the Greater Upper Nile region. The narratives of those displaced and those who stayed behind reveal the complexity of social change and show how this has impacted on state formation in what is now South Sudan and, in particular, the crucial yet relatively unconsidered transformation of gender and generational relations.
 
Speaker
Katarzyna Grabska
 Research fellow, Graduate Institute of International and 
Development Studies, Geneva
May 16, 2016
6th floor LoungeHill House AUCTahrir Campus
6:30-8:00pm

Films screenings & debates – « OUR BELOVED SUDAN” in CEDEJ Khartoum, on April 28th

In order to further promote academic exchanges, CEDEJ Khartoum is continuing its series of documentary films screenings and debates.

In recent years, several documentaries dealing with key themes of interest to CEDEJ Khartoum – Sudan, the 2011 separation, migration issues, the Arab world, etc. – were produced. The content of these films, the approach chosen by the director, as well as the use of video in relation to academic research, are all topics of interest for our PhD students and researchers.

After « Days of Hope » (by the Danish director Ditte Haarløv Johnsen), we are pleased to announce our second screening:

Thursday 28th April, 2016, at 2 PM

CEDEJ Khartoum will screen the documentary “Our Beloved Sudan”

by the Anglo-Sudanese director Taghreed Elsanhouri

OurBelovedSudan_PosterOur beloved Sudan (92 min, 2012) takes the historical trajectory of a nation from birth in 1956 to its death or transmutation into two separate states in 2011 and within this structure it interlaces a public and a private story. Inviting key political figures to reflexively engage with the historical trajectory of the film while observing an ordinary mixed race family caught across the divides of a big historical moment as they try to make sense of it and live through it.”

Dr Azza AZIZ, anthropologist with interest in forced internal displacement, will lead an after-screening discussion of the film.

We hope to see you there! ■

PUBLICATION – Exclusive Universities: Use and Misuse of Affirmative Action in Sudanese Higher Education, By Elise TENRET

CEDEJ Khartoum is pleased to announce Elise Tenret’s recent publication « Exclusive Universities: Use and Misuse of Affirmative Action in Sudanese Higher Education » in Comparative Education Review (May 2016).

 

Abstract:

Although characterized by repeated ethnic conflicts, Sudan has implemented affirmative action at universities since the 1970s for students coming from war zones and remote areas. The implementation of compensatory measures has been promoted—somehow imposed—by the several peace treaties and by the massive expansion of higher education during the 1990s. The former have led to the creation of “special admission,” mainly for students coming from conflict zones; the latter has led to the creation of “state admissions,” which favor local recruitment for the newly created universities. However, those measures have proved inefficient for several reasons: first, the lack of consistency of the policy; second, the lack of political will; third, the lack of monitoring. The wider context—the liberalization of higher education and the independence of South Sudan—has also contributed to diminishing the scope of the policy.◼

Elise Tenret, « Exclusive Universities: Use and Misuse of Affirmative Action in Sudanese Higher Education, » Comparative Education Review 60, no. 2 (May 2016): 375-402.

PUBLICATION – Pathways of Accumulation in Sudan: The Case of Darfurian Cross-Border Traders, by Raphaëlle Chevrillon-Guibert

CEDEJ Khartoum is pleased to announce Raphaëlle Chevrillon-Guibert’s recent publication : « Les commerçants zaghawa du Darfour (Soudan) : des passeurs de frontières » [Pathways of Accumulation in Sudan: The Case of Darfurian Cross-Border Traders] in Territoire en mouvement Revue de géographie et aménagement.

Continuer la lecture de PUBLICATION – Pathways of Accumulation in Sudan: The Case of Darfurian Cross-Border Traders, by Raphaëlle Chevrillon-Guibert

CEDEJ-Khartoum