Revue de presse du CEDEJ du Caire – Le partage des eaux du Nil entre Egypte, Soudan et Ethiopie, par Wahel Rashid

Focus – Le partage des eaux du Nil entre Egypte, Soudan et Ethiopie : revue de presse (1)

dans rubrique Revue de presse – Ressources/Environnement

par Wahel Rashid

Le 23 mars 2015, le premier ministre éthiopien, Hailemariam Desalegn, le président égyptien, Abdel Fattah al-Sissi et le président soudanais Omar el-Béchir, réunis à Khartoum, ont décidé de signer un accord de « principe » afin d’aplanir leurs différends concernant la question du Nil. En effet, depuis 2011, le projet de construction par le gouvernement éthiopien d’un barrage sur le Nil bleu envenime les relations entres les trois Etats. En Egypte, cette question est régulièrement traitée comme une question de sécurité nationale pour le pays puisque 95% de son approvisionnement en eau vient du Nil ; or le Nil bleu contribue à hauteur de 59% du débit total du Nil. Cet événement fut l’occasion d’un échange de « courtoisie » entre les chefs d’Etat éthiopien et égyptien : Hailemariam Desalegn assura que le projet éthiopien ne causerait pas de dommage à l’Egypte, tandis qu’Abdel Fattah al-Sissi annonça que, entre la coopération et le conflit, les trois pays avaient « choisi de coopérer ». Les tensions avaient atteint leur paroxysme en juin 2013 lorsque l’ancien président égyptien, Mohamed Morsi, avait dirigé une réunion au cours de laquelle certains responsables égyptiens avaient suggéré d’utiliser la force armée pour régler la question du barrage Renaissance en Ethiopie. Le barrage Renaissance (GERD en anglais pour Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam) qui doit être opérationnel en 2017 promet d’être la plus grande structure hydroélectrique d’Afrique avec une production de 6000 mégawatts par an. Le coût prévu pour ces travaux est de 4,5 milliards d’euros entièrement financés par l’Ethiopie et ses citoyens à travers un emprunt obligataire national.
Continuer la lecture de Revue de presse du CEDEJ du Caire – Le partage des eaux du Nil entre Egypte, Soudan et Ethiopie, par Wahel Rashid

Katarzyna Grabska wins Amaury Talbot Prize for African Anthropology

We are extremely pleased to announce that Katarzyna Grabska, associate researcher at CEDEJ Khartoum, recently won the 2014 Amaury Talbot Prize for African Anthropology for her book Gender, Home and Identity: Nuer Repatriation to Southern Sudan (Boydell & Brewer Ltd 2014).

Katarzyna Grabska’s conference in AUC on May 16th – « Gender, Home & Identity: Nuer Repatriation to Southern Sudan »


Center for Migration and Refugee Studies
Seminar Series
« Gender, Home & Identity: Nuer Repatriation to Southern Sudan »
 
How and where did returning Nuer refugees make their ‘homes’ in South Sudan? How were gender relations and identity redefined as a result of war, displacement and return to post-war communities? And how were those displaced able to recreate sense of home, community and nation?
During the civil wars in Southern Sudan (1983-2005) many of the displaced Sudanese, including many Nuer, were in refugee camps in Kenya and Ethiopia. In the aftermath of the Comprehensive Peace Agreement, they repatriated to Southern Sudan. Faced with finding long-lost relatives and local expectations of ‘proper behaviour’, they often felt displaced again.
In this presentation, Grabska will present the findings of her recent book in which she  followed the lives of a group of Nuer in the Greater Upper Nile region. The narratives of those displaced and those who stayed behind reveal the complexity of social change and show how this has impacted on state formation in what is now South Sudan and, in particular, the crucial yet relatively unconsidered transformation of gender and generational relations.
 
Speaker
Katarzyna Grabska
 Research fellow, Graduate Institute of International and 
Development Studies, Geneva
May 16, 2016
6th floor LoungeHill House AUCTahrir Campus
6:30-8:00pm

PUBLICATION – Exclusive Universities: Use and Misuse of Affirmative Action in Sudanese Higher Education, By Elise TENRET

CEDEJ Khartoum is pleased to announce Elise Tenret’s recent publication « Exclusive Universities: Use and Misuse of Affirmative Action in Sudanese Higher Education » in Comparative Education Review (May 2016).

 

Abstract:

Although characterized by repeated ethnic conflicts, Sudan has implemented affirmative action at universities since the 1970s for students coming from war zones and remote areas. The implementation of compensatory measures has been promoted—somehow imposed—by the several peace treaties and by the massive expansion of higher education during the 1990s. The former have led to the creation of “special admission,” mainly for students coming from conflict zones; the latter has led to the creation of “state admissions,” which favor local recruitment for the newly created universities. However, those measures have proved inefficient for several reasons: first, the lack of consistency of the policy; second, the lack of political will; third, the lack of monitoring. The wider context—the liberalization of higher education and the independence of South Sudan—has also contributed to diminishing the scope of the policy.◼

Elise Tenret, « Exclusive Universities: Use and Misuse of Affirmative Action in Sudanese Higher Education, » Comparative Education Review 60, no. 2 (May 2016): 375-402.

PUBLICATION – Pathways of Accumulation in Sudan: The Case of Darfurian Cross-Border Traders, by Raphaëlle Chevrillon-Guibert

CEDEJ Khartoum is pleased to announce Raphaëlle Chevrillon-Guibert’s recent publication : « Les commerçants zaghawa du Darfour (Soudan) : des passeurs de frontières » [Pathways of Accumulation in Sudan: The Case of Darfurian Cross-Border Traders] in Territoire en mouvement Revue de géographie et aménagement.

Continuer la lecture de PUBLICATION – Pathways of Accumulation in Sudan: The Case of Darfurian Cross-Border Traders, by Raphaëlle Chevrillon-Guibert

Photo/Cartoon Contest On The Separation Of Sudan // Cover Book For Our Special Issue On Sudan In EMA Journal

Photo/Cartoon Contest On The Separation Of Sudan // Cover Book For Our Special Issue On Sudan In EMA Journal

Help us to find the best cover book for our special issue on Sudan in EMA (Egypte Monde Arabe) Journal*!

This summer, in EMA Journal, CEDEJ Khartoum will publish a special issue on Sudan entitled “The Sudan, five years after the independence of South Sudan: which reconfigurations, transformations, and evolutions in the “North”? » (Please find below a more detailed description**)

This special issue needs a good cover book best illustrating the topic of the separation of Sudan: can you think of a photo or a cartoon on this topic? The competition is open!

The winner will have the honor to see her/his photo/cartoon selected for the cover of our journal. She/he will receive a copy of this special issue of EMA Journal. We will also print and frame her/his photo or cartoon. Finally, the winner will be invited to have lunch with our team in CEDEJ Khartoum!

Send your photo or cartoon with your name + a short descriptive text to: cedejkhartoum@gmail.com.

Submission deadline: May 1st, 2016.

* Egypte/monde arabe is a social science journal published in Cairo by the CEDEJ. This journal is both for professional researchers and for lay audience who want to understand the ongoing tensions and mutations in the contemporary Muslim and Arab world – in Egypt, in particular. Each issue of the magazine is devoted to a specific theme.

** Detailed description of our special issue:

« The Sudan, five years after the independence of South Sudan: which reconfigurations, transformations, and evolutions in the “North”? »

South Sudan officially gained independence on the 9th July 2011. This was the outcome of the peace agreement signed in January 2005 and in accordance with the national referendum of January 2011. This historic event, which should have put an end on the historical conflict between the Northern and Southern regions and communities, constituted a real challenge in term of adaptation, resilience and innovation for the whole of the society.

In this unprecedented context of the birth of a new national territory, and the remodelling of existing spatial and political configurations, South Sudan has logically been at the centre of attention – whether this be from political actors, researchers or humanitarian donors. However, the North has been profoundly affected by this rupture as well.

The intention of this issue is to shed light on some of these transformations: the revision of past bureaucratic structures and the creation of new ones, the drastic decrease of oil income in the states revenues and their strategies to replace it, the repositioning of the country at a regional and international scale, the departure of millions of South-Sudanese and their “reappearance” as a new category of stateless refugees (South-Sudanese) in the territory, the changes to nationality laws… It is about fundamental repercussions on the political, religious, social, administrative or economical level, that in turn effect the social and identity relations as much as spatial organisation or even memory.

This special issue proposes to catch up on these evolutions, more or less brutal or linear, five years after the independence of South Sudan, which strongly calls for further research in social sciences and humanities. Finally, we want to also open a reflection on the consequences that the separation has concretely had on the feasibility of research, as for example the increasing difficulty in carrying on archival research, or the obstacles to the access to certain regions and/or informants.

The ambition of this issue of EMA on Sudan is not to be exhaustive, but to offer a space of reflexion for the empirical research that has been carried out during the last five years. These fieldworks all share the common factor of questioning the consequences of South Sudan’s independence. The aim of this issue is to collect articles of different types (short or long, research notes, notes on current affairs), based on a variety of sources (press, photos, social media, ethnographic material), on different topics and perspectives in order to decrypt the complexity of socio-economic, spatial, political, and identity reconfigurations. A particular attention will be given to works showing the tensions and conflicts that this separation has caused or reinforced in the multiple spheres of Sudanese society. While some Sudanese politicians are stressing the supposed homogeneity of the Sudanese society since the separation of South Sudan, we intend, in contrast, to highlight the processes of differentiation and the on-going reconfiguration of categories.

The last two issues of the EMA specifically about Sudan date from the 1990’s (n°16-17) and reflected on the different aspects of the 1980’s crisis. For this reason, it is high time to renew this fruitful experience.◼

PUBLICATION – Soudan – La CPI et le crime de génocide : Manoeuvres politiques et statut des minorités au Darfour, par Philippe GOUT

Soudan – La CPI et le crime de génocide :
Manoeuvres politiques et statut des minorités au Darfour

par Philippe GOUT

Article publié sur le site de Noria, think tank et réseau d’experts en relations internationales

Cette enquête (en anglais) porte sur l’échec de la Cour Pénale Internationale (CPI) au Soudan. En se focalisant sur le Président soudanais Omar El-Béchir afin d’obtenir son arrestation, l’action de la CPI et les manœuvres politiques autour de la qualification de génocide, ont eu des effets dramatiques sur la catégorisation des minorités au Darfour.

De ce travail se dégagent trois conclusions majeures :

Continuer la lecture de PUBLICATION – Soudan – La CPI et le crime de génocide : Manoeuvres politiques et statut des minorités au Darfour, par Philippe GOUT

Séminaire – De Bangui à Khartoum, une migration de crise?, par Khadidja MEDANI, le 28/03/2016

Le lundi 28 mars 2016, Khadidja MEDANI a présenté au CEDEJ les premiers résultats de son travail de terrain auprès des migrants centre-africains à Khartoum.

On Monday 28 March, Khadidja MEDANI has presented in CEDEJ her findings from her fieldwork with Central-African migrants in Khartoum.

Khadidja medani - 28-03-2016By Khadidja MEDANI:

Student in a Master 1 in Geography at the University
Panthéon-Sorbonne, I am on a fieldwork about the Central African
community in Khartoum. The border between the Central African Republic and Sudan has always been porous and the Central African’s presence in Darfur is old. However, the migration of Central African in Khartoum seems to be more recent and linked with the troubles since the putsches of François Bozize and Michel Djotodia. This small community has still a low visibility and has not been studied since now. I focus my study on why and how they left the Central African Republic and came into Sudan. I try to find which networks lead them up to Khartoum and help to their integration. I also ask the question of the status of these migrants. This last point reveals a link between the refugees and the students. Actually, the main network for the Central African
to integrate them in Khartoum seems to be the International University of Africa. ◼

?????????????

Vignettes tirées de la bande-dessinée « Tempête sur Bangui », de Didier Kassai, La Boîte à Bulles/Amnesty International, 2015.

OFFRE DE STAGE – Stage de Master-2 de recherche de terrain sur les migrants soudanais CEDEJ Khartoum/Triangle GH

Dans un contexte européen de forte médiatisation du phénomène migratoire, la collecte de données scientifiques permettant d’éclairer la question est un impératif pour les chercheurs, les travailleurs humanitaires et les concepteurs de politiques publiques. A partir de ce constat, le Centre d’Etudes et de Documentation Economiques, Juridiques et Sociales (CEDEJ) de Khartoum et l’ONG Triangle Génération Humanitaire se joignent pour proposer un stage niveau master 2 de recherche de terrain sur les migrants soudanais.

Continuer la lecture de OFFRE DE STAGE – Stage de Master-2 de recherche de terrain sur les migrants soudanais CEDEJ Khartoum/Triangle GH

Conference – Several presentations on Sudan in « Writing Women’s Lives Conference » in School of Foreign Service in Qatar (Georgetown University), March 20th-22nd, 2016

Writing Women’s Lives Conference


Day 1 – March 20th, 2016

9:00 AM
Registration

9:30 AM
Panel 1: New Paradigms & Approaches

Andrea O’reily, York University, Canada
Aint I a Feminist? Matricentric Feminism, Feminist Mamas and Why Mothers Need a Feminist Movement/Theory of Their Own

Mervat Hatem, Howard University, USA
Contesting Canonical Representations of Women’s Lives: the Case of `A’isha Taymur (1840-1902)

Continuer la lecture de Conference – Several presentations on Sudan in « Writing Women’s Lives Conference » in School of Foreign Service in Qatar (Georgetown University), March 20th-22nd, 2016

Call for application / Doctoral partnership – “Reconnecting the Pitt Rivers Museum’s Zande collections with their historical and contemporary contexts in South Sudan”

OXFORD UNIVERSITY MUSEUMS AHRC COLLABORATIVE DOCTORAL PARTNERSHIP

Department of History, University of Durham in collaboration with Pitt Rivers Museum, Oxford

Reconnecting the Pitt Rivers Museum’s Zande collections with their historical and contemporary contexts in South Sudan

Applications are invited for an AHRC-funded Ph.D. studentship based at the University of Durham: “Reconnecting the Pitt Rivers Museum’s Zande collections with their historical and contemporary contexts in South Sudan”. This is one of the studentships awarded by the Oxford University Museums AHRC Collaborative Doctoral Partnership. The partner institutions are the University of Durham and the Pitt Rivers Museum in Oxford. The studentship will be supervised by Dr Cherry Leonardi at the University of Durham and Dr Chris Morton at the Pitt Rivers Museum. The student will be enrolled at, and will receive their Ph.D. from, the University of Durham. This full-time studentship, which is fully funded for three years, will begin on 1 October 2016.

Continuer la lecture de Call for application / Doctoral partnership – “Reconnecting the Pitt Rivers Museum’s Zande collections with their historical and contemporary contexts in South Sudan”

Our researchers / nos chercheurs

Coordination of CEDEJ Khartoum : Dr Alice FRANCK, Geographer, Lecturer in Geography in Paris 1 University, Researcher affiliated to PRODIG  (UMR 8586)

Email : alicefranck@yahoo.fr

Since 2011, CEDEJ Khartoum has supported several visiting/Sudanese researchers and students. The nature of this support varies, and is based on the request, on the evaluation of the dossier presented and on the resources available.

Depuis 2011, le CEDEJ Khartoum a apporté son soutien à plusieurs chercheurs et étudiants de passage ainsi qu’à des chercheurs et doctorants soudanais. La nature de ce soutien est variable, et est déterminée en fonction de la demande formulée, de l’évaluation qui est faite du dossier présenté et des ressources disponibles.

Visiting researchers and students

Chercheurs et étudiants de passage

Currently/recently:

  • Azza Ahmed Abdel aziz – Azza Ahmed Abdel Aziz holds a Ph. D in Social and Medical anthropology gained in 2013 from the department of Sociology and Anthropology, School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London. Her research interests focus on cultural understandings of health, which largely feature an exploration of the interface between such understandings and bio-medical configurations of health. Dr. Aziz’s work focuses on how different individuals and groups access health on a continuum ranging from therapeutics based on cultural beliefs to those based on scientific epistemologies. She has in-depth experience working on these issues among southern Sudanese and South Sudanese individuals and groups of people displaced in Khartoum whose lives have been subject to experiences of movement/migration in different forms. She has also worked with victims of torture in London.
  • Hind Mahmud Youssef –  Hind Mahmud Youssef has been studying food technology at Jezirah University. However, her research interests has evolved: she obtained a master degree at Ahfad university on gender studies (she wrote her master thesis on the socio-economic impacts of fistula in Sudan). She is currently a Phd student on development studies with a gender perspective at Ahfad University for Women. She is also contributing to our research programme METRO 2 SOUDAN.
  • Nadine Rea Intisar Adam – Since 2014, she is Ph.D Candidate at the International Max Planck Research School on Retaliation, Mediation and Punishment (REMEP), based at the Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology in Halle/Saale, she is also a member of the LOST (Law, Organisation, Science and Technology) research group at University of Halle-Wittenberg. Her doctoral dissertation project is: « Gender and Art in the Quest for Peace. Women’s Involvement in Peace Building and the Role of Art in Peace Processes in Sudan ».

Continuer la lecture de Our researchers / nos chercheurs

PUBLICATION – Complications in the classification of conflict areas and conflicts actors for the identification of ‘conflict gold’ from Sudan, by DR ENRICO ILLE

CEDEJ Khartoum is pleased to announce Dr Enrico Ille’s recent publication :

Complications in the classification of conflict areas and conflicts actors for the identification of ‘conflict gold’ from Sudan

 

This article discusses a recent call to include gold from Sudan in the ‘conflict gold’ category of global supply chains. The call reacts to Sudan’s protracted violent conflicts, as well as a recent surge in gold mining that became of essential importance for governmental policies after most of the country’s oil reserves were lost with South Sudan’s independence in 2011. The extension of gold mining in areas with violent conflicts, so the call’s demand, requires due diligence concerning gold from Sudan and an extension of sanctions to conflict actors benefiting from it. On this basis, the article reviews critically the contradictions that arise from the convention to both define territorial conflict areas and collective conflict actors, and connect due diligence to case-by-case assessment, representing an attempt to concomitantly advocate human rights and preserve investment opportunities. Further complications arise from contradictions between state sovereignty and international humanitarian law, as well as the complexities of violent conflicts whose causes cannot be readily identified and targeted. The author argues that this results in numerous ambiguities of situation assessments and planned interventions, which have to be acknowledged if unintended negative consequences are sought to be reduced.

Published in:

The Extractive Industries and Society, Volume 3, Issue 1, January 2016, Pages 193–203

On the topic of gold mining, see also Jérôme Tubiana’s recent article in Foreign Affairs : https://www.foreignaffairs.com/articles/chad/2016-02-24/after-libya-rush-gold-and-guns  ◼

Conference – « Tradition in Sudanese modern architecture – EXPO 2015:The Pavillion of the Sudan »

« Tradition in Sudanese modern architecture – EXPO 2015:The Pavillion of the Sudan » by Prof. Davide Longhi and Prof. Sandro Grispan of the IUAV University of Venice.

Conference in Khartoum on Sunday 6th of March 2016,  at 7:00 pm.

Venue: Sudan Hall, First Floor of the Main Library of the University of Khartoum, Nile Avenue entrance. ◼

 

CEDEJ-Khartoum