CALL FOR PAPERS – Conference « Appropriating Space in Colonial and Imperial contexts », June 12-14th 2017

An  international conference on appropriating  space  in colonial and  imperial contexts will be held at  the Maison méditerranéenne des sciences de  l’homme  (MMSH), Aix-en-Provence, France, on 12-14 June 2017.

Please find the call for papers: in French and in English.

The organizers invite paper proposals from a broad spectrum  of  humanities  and  social  sciences,  including  history,  geography,  anthropology, sociology, economics, political science, and literature.

Please submit proposals in either French or English consisting of a short CV (max. 4 pages) and a paper abstract (1-2 pages). Send these materials before September 30, 2016 to the following e-mail address: colloqueappropriations@gmail.com

 

THEMATIC RESEARCH GRANTS – CALL FOR APPLICATIONS – British Institute in Eastern Africa (BIEA)

Call for Applications: BIEA Thematic Research Grants

Every year the British Institute in Eastern Africa (BIEA) invites applications for our small Thematic Research Grants. These funds are usually dispersed through two calls for applications per year, usually released in June/July and December. This is the first call for applications in the 2016-7 year. Please pay attention to this webpage in December 2016 for the second grant call and deadline information.

Continuer la lecture de THEMATIC RESEARCH GRANTS – CALL FOR APPLICATIONS – British Institute in Eastern Africa (BIEA)

CEDEJ Khartoum’s research activities on migration

In 2015 and 2016, CEDEJ Khartoum particularly invested in migration issues through different scientific events and the support of several researchers/PhD students’ fieldwork in Sudan.

 

IMG_9604A scientific conference, organized by CEDEJ Khartoum, CFEE in Addis Ababa and the University of Khartoum entitled “Migration and Exile in the Horn of Africa: State of Knowledge and Current Debates” was held in November 2015 in Khartoum: for two days this major event brought together about forty researchers specialized in the field of migrations in the Horn of Africa.

♦♦♦

picture-115Dr Catherine Wihtol de Wenden is a renowned specialist on migration.

During her visit in CEDEJ Khartoum, we screened the documentary « Time to look at girls: migrants in Bangladesh and Ethiopia »(directed by Marco Speroni, 31 minutes – 2015), produced and researched by Katarzyna Grabska, Nicoletta Del Franco and Marina De Regt.

Affiche-film2

♦♦♦

  • Dr Katarzyna Grabska’s field research on patterns of return and displacement movements of South-Sudanese en route to Sudan/Ethiopia as a result of the civil conflict in the South.

In January 2016, CEDEJ Khartoum organized the book launch of her book « Gender, Home & Identity: Nuer repatriation to Southern Sudan » (James Currey, 2014) at the University of Khartoum.cover photo

♦♦♦

  • Film screening/debate about migration in March 2016: “Days of hope”, by the Danish director Ditte Haarlov Johnsen

“DAYS OF HOPE” (2013, 74 min) – Every year thousands of Africans leave their families behind and risk their lives in hope of a better life. “Days of Hope” brings us close to these people, providing an inside look at the struggles these emigrants face.

Dr Kasia GRABSKA and Dr Azza AZIZ, anthropologists with interest in migration issues, lead an after-screening discussion of the film.

♦♦♦

« The border between the Central African Republic and Sudan has always been porous and the Central African’s presence in Darfur is old. However, the migration of Central African in Khartoum seems to be more recent and linked with the troubles since the putsches of François Bozize and Michel Djotodia. This small community has still a low visibility and has not been studied since now. I focus my study on why and how they left the Central African Republic and came into Sudan. I try to find which networks lead them up to Khartoum and help to their integration. I also ask the question of the status of these migrants. This last point reveals a link between the refugees and the students. Actually, the main network for the Central African to integrate them in Khartoum seems to be the International University of Africa. » – Khadidja Medani

♦♦♦

  • Miralyne Zeghnoune’s ongoing fieldwork on Sudanese migrants in France and in Sudan.

Miralyne Zeghnoune, a master student, is currently collecting data on Sudanese migrants’ conditions in France (migratory route, reasons for leaving, future projects, connections with the family in Sudan, etc.). After two-month fieldwork in France (Paris, Lyon, Calais), she will study in Khartoum these migrants’ family and entourage (initial project, administrative procedures, contacts with the migrant, etc.).

♦♦♦

  • Alice Koumurian’s fieldwork on Syrian migrants (after 2011) in Khartoum.

Undeniably, the phenomenon of the increasing flow of Syrians coming to Sudan, resulting from the closing of the Turkish border coupled with the facility of entrance to Sudan due to the fact that they do not need a visa to enter Sudan and permission of stay is not unduly complicated, also requires the collection and analysis of data.

♦♦♦

 

Films screenings & debates – « WE WERE REBELS” in CEDEJ Khartoum

In order to further promote academic exchanges, CEDEJ Khartoum is continuing its series of documentary films screenings and debates.

In recent years, several documentaries dealing with key themes of interest to CEDEJ Khartoum – Sudan, the 2011 separation, migration issues, the Arab world, etc. – were produced. The content of these films, the approach chosen by the director, as well as the use of video in relation to academic research, are all topics of interest for our PhD students and researchers.

After « Days of Hope » (by the Danish director Ditte Haarløv Johnsen) and « Our Beloved Sudan » (by the Anglo-Sudanese director Taghreed Elsanhouri), we were pleased to organize our third screening in CEDEJ Khartoum (26/05/2016):

« We Were Rebels »

by Katharina von Schroeder and Florian Schewe

For the first time in Sudan!

In the presence of Katharina von Schroeder, one of the film directors.

The documentary film WE WERE REBELS tells the story of Agel, a former child soldier who returns to South Sudan to help build up his country. The film accompanies him over a period of two years – from South Sudan gaining its independence in 2011 to the renewed outbreak of civil war in December 2013
 
Awards:
Grimme Preis 2015
« Best Documentary » Brooklyn Film Festival 2015
« Grand prix du jury » International Human Rights Film Festival Paris 2016
Trailer:
Facebook: 
Team:
Director / camera : Katharina von Schroeder, Florian Schewe
Produktion: PFS Films Berlin

Dr Alice Franck’s presentation on urban agriculture at the Sudanese Institute of Architects (SIA)’s 4th Scientific and Professional conference


On Monday 23rd May, Dr Alice Franck, Geographer and Coordinator of CEDEJ Khartoum, presented her paper « Urban Agriculture Facing Land Pressure in Greater Khartoum – The Case of New Real Estate Projects in Tuti and Abū Seʿīd » at the Sudanese Institute of Architects (SIA)’s 4th Scientific and Professional conference.

DSC_1067DSC_1062

Abstract

The starting point for a deep transformation that has taken place within the capital of Sudan between 2000 and 2010 was the oil export terminal commissioned in Port Sudan in 1999. The peace agreements between north and south Sudan were signed in January 2005, reinforcing the role of the land and real estate sector in Khartoum, which had become the major focus of the petrodollar market driving the recent strong growth until the secession of South Sudan on 9 July 2011.[i] The lucrative oil market has not only reinforced the hegemonic role of the capital – as the unique economic pole of the country – but has equally underwritten the conurbation’s attractiveness without redressing deep regional discrepancies (Denis 2006). The creation of South Sudan as an independent state clearly affects the situation. Conflicts for resources have been recurrent since Sudanese independence and continue to grow in the border region between the two separated countries. The Republic of the Sudan has lost part of its control over oil resources in the region, but it is still too early to measure the impact of that on urban investments.

blobThe real estate sector is booming and the whole city is being revamped. The morphology of Khartoum has radically changed. Skyscrapers have recently appeared in the city and are designed in the style of modern architectural buildings. These initially model designs in the city centre have now been built in adjacent districts stretching towards the outskirts of the city. Thus, this residential architectural model is proliferating throughout the city, and increasingly the construction of skyscrapers is no longer exclusively reserved for hotels and office buildings. Noteworthy urban projects have been quickly implemented, and Khartoum has been rapidly transformed into a huge construction site, wherein businessmen hailing from a diverse array of countries (Sudanese, Arabs, Asians and Europeans) take an active part. The frenzied increase in transport infrastructure construction bears witness to the urban dynamism that has characterized Khartoum in the last few years. Three new bridges have been built between 2005 and 2009, on the confluence of the Blue and the White Niles, with a fourth moving towards completion. Hundreds of kilometres of roads have been asphalted and now connect the different parts of the city centre to the extremities in the outskirts. In the space of less than five years the airport road, formerly full of pot holes, became a brand-new road with four lanes in both directions. The current redesign of Greater Khartoum reveals the sudden openness of the country to the market economy and globalization. This contrasts with the situation since independence and especially during the 1980s, when public works activities were extremely limited. The propagation of prestige urban projects has become the new trend that marks the current era (Choplin and Franck 2010).

My initial research into this location of intense speculation examined the future of the central areas that remained under agricultural activity and how they were gradually being transformed into urban areas (Franck 2007). The approach adopted analysed the resistance of agriculture and farmers to the spread of real estate and the pressure of competition over land ownership. Five years later, the action in favour of urban plan renewal has been drastically intensified and the capacity for resistance severely diminished; three of the five market gardening areas (Tuti, Shambat, Abū Seʿīd, Abu Rof and Mogran) observed during fieldwork in 2001–5 are subject to huge real estate projects (Mogran, Abū Seʿīd and Tuti). In this chapter, I focus my analysis on how landowners and the entire agricultural sector can both adapt to and confront the transformation.

The first objective of this paper is to examine how landowners react differently to the new active interest in their land, the implementation of prestigious real estate projects and the end of agricultural activity. Two case studies are used, at Tuti and Abū Seʿīd. Based on data from fieldwork in 2001–5 and an enquiry carried out in a shorter but more recent period of fieldwork in January 2009 related to the pressing land issue,[ii] I will trace the genesis of these new real estate projects. My analysis is based on the premise that land that is allocated agricultural status is of special interest for speculative transactions. Various projects are presented and their key actors are identified.

In the second part of this chapter, I examine how Tuti, a genuine rural island in the heart of the city centre, is being transformed. Tuti was chosen because, on the one hand, it has been the site of a symbolic resistance to urbanization for years; on the other hand, currently the majority of the inhabitants have been inclined to initiate or participate in the real estate projects on the island. I extend the analysis to a current land dispute to highlight the ferocity of the ongoing transformations, using Abū Seʿīd as an example.

Finally, using a comparative approach, I stress the importance of land issues in Khartoum: between Khartoum State, the Sudanese state, foreign and local investors, builders and traditional property owners. The land affected by the new real estate orientations has been appropriated by occupiers over a long period of time. Their identities and social biographies are thus firmly etched on this land. Although they are equally the object of a new urban agenda driven by other actors, two different strategies emerge.

[i]. Most of the data exposed in this chapter were gathered before the separation of north and south Sudan, that is to say, at the peak of the country’s economic growth and real estate investments.

[ii]. During the course of my Ph.D. project, I conducted fieldwork in Khartoum in the period 2001–5. The data from this period is used in this chapter to underline the evolution concerning the use of land and the attachment of landowners to agricultural land. However, another period of fieldwork in January 2009 focused on land conflict issues related to the agricultural status of land. This latter enquiry provides information about the conflict in Abū Seʿīd and launches another investigation on land administration and land registration. Since 2010, I have carried out regular fieldwork in Khartoum that allowed me to complete some data, in particular in the case of Tuti. Qualitative methods are used leading to a first sociological analysis of the new real estate projects.

The programme of the  conference: Conference program_14.5.2016 (1) (1)

Revue de presse du CEDEJ du Caire – Le partage des eaux du Nil entre Egypte, Soudan et Ethiopie, par Wahel Rashid

Focus – Le partage des eaux du Nil entre Egypte, Soudan et Ethiopie : revue de presse (1)

dans rubrique Revue de presse – Ressources/Environnement

par Wahel Rashid

Le 23 mars 2015, le premier ministre éthiopien, Hailemariam Desalegn, le président égyptien, Abdel Fattah al-Sissi et le président soudanais Omar el-Béchir, réunis à Khartoum, ont décidé de signer un accord de « principe » afin d’aplanir leurs différends concernant la question du Nil. En effet, depuis 2011, le projet de construction par le gouvernement éthiopien d’un barrage sur le Nil bleu envenime les relations entres les trois Etats. En Egypte, cette question est régulièrement traitée comme une question de sécurité nationale pour le pays puisque 95% de son approvisionnement en eau vient du Nil ; or le Nil bleu contribue à hauteur de 59% du débit total du Nil. Cet événement fut l’occasion d’un échange de « courtoisie » entre les chefs d’Etat éthiopien et égyptien : Hailemariam Desalegn assura que le projet éthiopien ne causerait pas de dommage à l’Egypte, tandis qu’Abdel Fattah al-Sissi annonça que, entre la coopération et le conflit, les trois pays avaient « choisi de coopérer ». Les tensions avaient atteint leur paroxysme en juin 2013 lorsque l’ancien président égyptien, Mohamed Morsi, avait dirigé une réunion au cours de laquelle certains responsables égyptiens avaient suggéré d’utiliser la force armée pour régler la question du barrage Renaissance en Ethiopie. Le barrage Renaissance (GERD en anglais pour Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam) qui doit être opérationnel en 2017 promet d’être la plus grande structure hydroélectrique d’Afrique avec une production de 6000 mégawatts par an. Le coût prévu pour ces travaux est de 4,5 milliards d’euros entièrement financés par l’Ethiopie et ses citoyens à travers un emprunt obligataire national.
Continuer la lecture de Revue de presse du CEDEJ du Caire – Le partage des eaux du Nil entre Egypte, Soudan et Ethiopie, par Wahel Rashid

Katarzyna Grabska wins Amaury Talbot Prize for African Anthropology

We are extremely pleased to announce that Katarzyna Grabska, associate researcher at CEDEJ Khartoum, recently won the 2014 Amaury Talbot Prize for African Anthropology for her book Gender, Home and Identity: Nuer Repatriation to Southern Sudan (Boydell & Brewer Ltd 2014).

Katarzyna Grabska’s conference in AUC on May 16th – « Gender, Home & Identity: Nuer Repatriation to Southern Sudan »


Center for Migration and Refugee Studies
Seminar Series
« Gender, Home & Identity: Nuer Repatriation to Southern Sudan »
 
How and where did returning Nuer refugees make their ‘homes’ in South Sudan? How were gender relations and identity redefined as a result of war, displacement and return to post-war communities? And how were those displaced able to recreate sense of home, community and nation?
During the civil wars in Southern Sudan (1983-2005) many of the displaced Sudanese, including many Nuer, were in refugee camps in Kenya and Ethiopia. In the aftermath of the Comprehensive Peace Agreement, they repatriated to Southern Sudan. Faced with finding long-lost relatives and local expectations of ‘proper behaviour’, they often felt displaced again.
In this presentation, Grabska will present the findings of her recent book in which she  followed the lives of a group of Nuer in the Greater Upper Nile region. The narratives of those displaced and those who stayed behind reveal the complexity of social change and show how this has impacted on state formation in what is now South Sudan and, in particular, the crucial yet relatively unconsidered transformation of gender and generational relations.
 
Speaker
Katarzyna Grabska
 Research fellow, Graduate Institute of International and 
Development Studies, Geneva
May 16, 2016
6th floor LoungeHill House AUCTahrir Campus
6:30-8:00pm

Films screenings & debates – « OUR BELOVED SUDAN” in CEDEJ Khartoum, on April 28th

In order to further promote academic exchanges, CEDEJ Khartoum is continuing its series of documentary films screenings and debates.

In recent years, several documentaries dealing with key themes of interest to CEDEJ Khartoum – Sudan, the 2011 separation, migration issues, the Arab world, etc. – were produced. The content of these films, the approach chosen by the director, as well as the use of video in relation to academic research, are all topics of interest for our PhD students and researchers.

After « Days of Hope » (by the Danish director Ditte Haarløv Johnsen), we are pleased to announce our second screening:

Thursday 28th April, 2016, at 2 PM

CEDEJ Khartoum will screen the documentary “Our Beloved Sudan”

by the Anglo-Sudanese director Taghreed Elsanhouri

OurBelovedSudan_PosterOur beloved Sudan (92 min, 2012) takes the historical trajectory of a nation from birth in 1956 to its death or transmutation into two separate states in 2011 and within this structure it interlaces a public and a private story. Inviting key political figures to reflexively engage with the historical trajectory of the film while observing an ordinary mixed race family caught across the divides of a big historical moment as they try to make sense of it and live through it.”

Dr Azza AZIZ, anthropologist with interest in forced internal displacement, will lead an after-screening discussion of the film.

We hope to see you there! ■

PUBLICATION – Exclusive Universities: Use and Misuse of Affirmative Action in Sudanese Higher Education, By Elise TENRET

CEDEJ Khartoum is pleased to announce Elise Tenret’s recent publication « Exclusive Universities: Use and Misuse of Affirmative Action in Sudanese Higher Education » in Comparative Education Review (May 2016).

 

Abstract:

Although characterized by repeated ethnic conflicts, Sudan has implemented affirmative action at universities since the 1970s for students coming from war zones and remote areas. The implementation of compensatory measures has been promoted—somehow imposed—by the several peace treaties and by the massive expansion of higher education during the 1990s. The former have led to the creation of “special admission,” mainly for students coming from conflict zones; the latter has led to the creation of “state admissions,” which favor local recruitment for the newly created universities. However, those measures have proved inefficient for several reasons: first, the lack of consistency of the policy; second, the lack of political will; third, the lack of monitoring. The wider context—the liberalization of higher education and the independence of South Sudan—has also contributed to diminishing the scope of the policy.◼

Elise Tenret, « Exclusive Universities: Use and Misuse of Affirmative Action in Sudanese Higher Education, » Comparative Education Review 60, no. 2 (May 2016): 375-402.

PUBLICATION – Pathways of Accumulation in Sudan: The Case of Darfurian Cross-Border Traders, by Raphaëlle Chevrillon-Guibert

CEDEJ Khartoum is pleased to announce Raphaëlle Chevrillon-Guibert’s recent publication : « Les commerçants zaghawa du Darfour (Soudan) : des passeurs de frontières » [Pathways of Accumulation in Sudan: The Case of Darfurian Cross-Border Traders] in Territoire en mouvement Revue de géographie et aménagement.

Continuer la lecture de PUBLICATION – Pathways of Accumulation in Sudan: The Case of Darfurian Cross-Border Traders, by Raphaëlle Chevrillon-Guibert

RESULTS OF OUR Photo/Cartoon Contest On The Separation Of Sudan // Cover Book For Our Special Issue On Sudan In EMA Journal

JURY RESULTS

Photo/Cartoon Contest On The Separation Of Sudan // Cover Book For Our Special Issue On Sudan In EMA Journal

Help us to find the best cover book for our special issue on Sudan in EMA (Egypte Monde Arabe) Journal*!

This summer, in EMA Journal, CEDEJ Khartoum will publish a special issue on Sudan entitled “The Sudan, five years after the independence of South Sudan: which reconfigurations, transformations, and evolutions in the “North”? » (Please find below a more detailed description**)

Continuer la lecture de RESULTS OF OUR Photo/Cartoon Contest On The Separation Of Sudan // Cover Book For Our Special Issue On Sudan In EMA Journal

PUBLICATION – Soudan – La CPI et le crime de génocide : Manoeuvres politiques et statut des minorités au Darfour, par Philippe GOUT

Soudan – La CPI et le crime de génocide :
Manoeuvres politiques et statut des minorités au Darfour

par Philippe GOUT

Article publié sur le site de Noria, think tank et réseau d’experts en relations internationales

Cette enquête (en anglais) porte sur l’échec de la Cour Pénale Internationale (CPI) au Soudan. En se focalisant sur le Président soudanais Omar El-Béchir afin d’obtenir son arrestation, l’action de la CPI et les manœuvres politiques autour de la qualification de génocide, ont eu des effets dramatiques sur la catégorisation des minorités au Darfour.

De ce travail se dégagent trois conclusions majeures :

Continuer la lecture de PUBLICATION – Soudan – La CPI et le crime de génocide : Manoeuvres politiques et statut des minorités au Darfour, par Philippe GOUT

Séminaire – De Bangui à Khartoum, une migration de crise?, par Khadidja MEDANI, le 28/03/2016

Le lundi 28 mars 2016, Khadidja MEDANI a présenté au CEDEJ les premiers résultats de son travail de terrain auprès des migrants centre-africains à Khartoum.

On Monday 28 March, Khadidja MEDANI has presented in CEDEJ her findings from her fieldwork with Central-African migrants in Khartoum.

Khadidja medani - 28-03-2016By Khadidja MEDANI:

Student in a Master 1 in Geography at the University
Panthéon-Sorbonne, I am on a fieldwork about the Central African
community in Khartoum. The border between the Central African Republic and Sudan has always been porous and the Central African’s presence in Darfur is old. However, the migration of Central African in Khartoum seems to be more recent and linked with the troubles since the putsches of François Bozize and Michel Djotodia. This small community has still a low visibility and has not been studied since now. I focus my study on why and how they left the Central African Republic and came into Sudan. I try to find which networks lead them up to Khartoum and help to their integration. I also ask the question of the status of these migrants. This last point reveals a link between the refugees and the students. Actually, the main network for the Central African
to integrate them in Khartoum seems to be the International University of Africa. ◼

?????????????

Vignettes tirées de la bande-dessinée « Tempête sur Bangui », de Didier Kassai, La Boîte à Bulles/Amnesty International, 2015.

OFFRE DE STAGE – Stage de Master-2 de recherche de terrain sur les migrants soudanais CEDEJ Khartoum/Triangle GH

Dans un contexte européen de forte médiatisation du phénomène migratoire, la collecte de données scientifiques permettant d’éclairer la question est un impératif pour les chercheurs, les travailleurs humanitaires et les concepteurs de politiques publiques. A partir de ce constat, le Centre d’Etudes et de Documentation Economiques, Juridiques et Sociales (CEDEJ) de Khartoum et l’ONG Triangle Génération Humanitaire se joignent pour proposer un stage niveau master 2 de recherche de terrain sur les migrants soudanais.

Continuer la lecture de OFFRE DE STAGE – Stage de Master-2 de recherche de terrain sur les migrants soudanais CEDEJ Khartoum/Triangle GH

CEDEJ-Khartoum