Archives de catégorie : Focus – Migrations

The documentary « 2 Girls » (Marco Speroni, 2016), based on Katarzyna Grabska’s research programme « Time to Look at Girls », wins two awards

Katarzyna Grabska, associate researcher at CEDEJ Khartoum and at the Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies of Geneva (IHEID), coordinated from January 2014 to December 2015 the research programme « Time to Look at Girls: Adolescent Girls Migration and Development »  with Nicoletta Del Franco and Marina de Regt (with the support of the Swiss Network of International Studies – SNIS).

Continuer la lecture de The documentary « 2 Girls » (Marco Speroni, 2016), based on Katarzyna Grabska’s research programme « Time to Look at Girls », wins two awards

Netsereab Andom’s participation in « The Regional Workshop on International Migration from the Horn of Africa to Sudan and from there Onwards »

Netsereab Andom, PhD student at the University of Khartoum and associated with CEDEJ Khartoum, recently presented a paper in « The Regional Workshop on International Migration from the Horn of Africa to Sudan and from there Onwards ».

Continuer la lecture de Netsereab Andom’s participation in « The Regional Workshop on International Migration from the Horn of Africa to Sudan and from there Onwards »

Fieldwork in Sudan social protection for Sudanese transnational families, a fieldnote by Ester Serra Mingot

A fieldnote by Ester Serra Mingot.

As part of the Marie Curie Initial Training Network (ITN), TRANSMIC (Transnational Migration, Citizenship and the Circulation of Rights and Responsibilities), I am conducting my PhD on “Transnational social protection: How Sudanese migrants in the Netherlands and the United Kingdom and their families in Sudan make use of social protection, locally and transnationally”.

This joint PhD project, between the University of Maastricht (Netherlands) and the University of Aix-Marseille (France), runs from 2014 until 2017.

During the course of the fieldwork in Sudan (mostly Khartoum and Omdurman), from August 3rd to October 16th 2016, I conducted ethnographic research with the families of the migrants I had previously met and interviewed in the Netherlands and the United Kingdom (UK).

Continuer la lecture de Fieldwork in Sudan social protection for Sudanese transnational families, a fieldnote by Ester Serra Mingot

Katarzyna Grabska’s recent publication in « Networks of Knowledge Production in Sudan. Identities, Mobilities, and Technologies »

CEDEJ Khartoum is happy to announce Katarzyna Grabska’s recent publication of a chapter entitled Eritrean Migratory Trajectories of Adolescence in Khartoum: (Im)mobility,  Identities, and Social Media in the collective book « Networks of Knowledge Production in Sudan. Identities, Mobilities, and Technologies » edited by Sondra Hale and Gada Kadoda (Lexington Books, Sept. 2016).

Dr Katarzyna Grabska is an associate researcher at CEDEJ Khartoum.51anycr4mil.

Ester Serra Mingot’s PhD research on « Transnational Social Protection. How Sudanese migrants in the Netherlands and the United Kingdom and their families in Sudan make use of social protection, locally and transnationally »

CV_picEster Serra Mingot, PhD Candidate at the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences in Maastricht University is currently doing her PhD on « Transnational Social Protection. How Sudanese migrants in the Netherlands and the United Kingdom and their families in Sudan make use of social protection, locally and transnationally ».

In Sudan, CEDEJ Khartoum will support her fieldwork. Continuer la lecture de Ester Serra Mingot’s PhD research on « Transnational Social Protection. How Sudanese migrants in the Netherlands and the United Kingdom and their families in Sudan make use of social protection, locally and transnationally »

Research Reports – Time to look at girls: Adolescent girls’ migration in the South

The project ‘Time to look at girls », coordinated by Katarzyna Grabska and Professor Alessandro Monsutti, now comes to an end. This project studied adolescent girls migrating internally and internationally from Bangladesh, Ethiopia and Sudan.

The final reports are now available: http://graduateinstitute.ch/home/research/centresandprogrammes/global-migration/ResearchProjects/CurrentProjects/adolescent-girls-development-and.html

Here you can download  the comparative research report (Bangladesh, Ethiopia and Sudan) by Dr Katarzyna Grabska, Dr Nicoletta Del Franco and Dr Marina de Regt: Research Report Sudan girls migration Comparative Research Report FIN

And Dr Katarzyna Grabska’s report on Sudan : Research Report Sudan girls migration

 

CEDEJ Khartoum’s research activities on migration

In 2015 and 2016, CEDEJ Khartoum particularly invested in migration issues through different scientific events and the support of several researchers/PhD students’ fieldwork in Sudan.

 

IMG_9604A scientific conference, organized by CEDEJ Khartoum, CFEE in Addis Ababa and the University of Khartoum entitled “Migration and Exile in the Horn of Africa: State of Knowledge and Current Debates” was held in November 2015 in Khartoum: for two days this major event brought together about forty researchers specialized in the field of migrations in the Horn of Africa.

♦♦♦

picture-115Dr Catherine Wihtol de Wenden is a renowned specialist on migration.

During her visit in CEDEJ Khartoum, we screened the documentary « Time to look at girls: migrants in Bangladesh and Ethiopia »(directed by Marco Speroni, 31 minutes – 2015), produced and researched by Katarzyna Grabska, Nicoletta Del Franco and Marina De Regt.

Affiche-film2

♦♦♦

  • Dr Katarzyna Grabska’s field research on patterns of return and displacement movements of South-Sudanese en route to Sudan/Ethiopia as a result of the civil conflict in the South.

In January 2016, CEDEJ Khartoum organized the book launch of her book « Gender, Home & Identity: Nuer repatriation to Southern Sudan » (James Currey, 2014) at the University of Khartoum.cover photo

♦♦♦

  • Film screening/debate about migration in March 2016: “Days of hope”, by the Danish director Ditte Haarlov Johnsen

“DAYS OF HOPE” (2013, 74 min) – Every year thousands of Africans leave their families behind and risk their lives in hope of a better life. “Days of Hope” brings us close to these people, providing an inside look at the struggles these emigrants face.

Dr Kasia GRABSKA and Dr Azza AZIZ, anthropologists with interest in migration issues, lead an after-screening discussion of the film.

♦♦♦

« The border between the Central African Republic and Sudan has always been porous and the Central African’s presence in Darfur is old. However, the migration of Central African in Khartoum seems to be more recent and linked with the troubles since the putsches of François Bozize and Michel Djotodia. This small community has still a low visibility and has not been studied since now. I focus my study on why and how they left the Central African Republic and came into Sudan. I try to find which networks lead them up to Khartoum and help to their integration. I also ask the question of the status of these migrants. This last point reveals a link between the refugees and the students. Actually, the main network for the Central African to integrate them in Khartoum seems to be the International University of Africa. » – Khadidja Medani

♦♦♦

  • Miralyne Zeghnoune’s ongoing fieldwork on Sudanese migrants in France and in Sudan.

Miralyne Zeghnoune, a master student, is currently collecting data on Sudanese migrants’ conditions in France (migratory route, reasons for leaving, future projects, connections with the family in Sudan, etc.). After two-month fieldwork in France (Paris, Lyon, Calais), she will study in Khartoum these migrants’ family and entourage (initial project, administrative procedures, contacts with the migrant, etc.).

♦♦♦

  • Alice Koumurian’s fieldwork on Syrian migrants (after 2011) in Khartoum.

Undeniably, the phenomenon of the increasing flow of Syrians coming to Sudan, resulting from the closing of the Turkish border coupled with the facility of entrance to Sudan due to the fact that they do not need a visa to enter Sudan and permission of stay is not unduly complicated, also requires the collection and analysis of data.

♦♦♦

 

Séminaire – De Bangui à Khartoum, une migration de crise?, par Khadidja MEDANI, le 28/03/2016

Le lundi 28 mars 2016, Khadidja MEDANI a présenté au CEDEJ les premiers résultats de son travail de terrain auprès des migrants centre-africains à Khartoum.

On Monday 28 March, Khadidja MEDANI has presented in CEDEJ her findings from her fieldwork with Central-African migrants in Khartoum.

Khadidja medani - 28-03-2016By Khadidja MEDANI:

Student in a Master 1 in Geography at the University
Panthéon-Sorbonne, I am on a fieldwork about the Central African
community in Khartoum. The border between the Central African Republic and Sudan has always been porous and the Central African’s presence in Darfur is old. However, the migration of Central African in Khartoum seems to be more recent and linked with the troubles since the putsches of François Bozize and Michel Djotodia. This small community has still a low visibility and has not been studied since now. I focus my study on why and how they left the Central African Republic and came into Sudan. I try to find which networks lead them up to Khartoum and help to their integration. I also ask the question of the status of these migrants. This last point reveals a link between the refugees and the students. Actually, the main network for the Central African
to integrate them in Khartoum seems to be the International University of Africa. ◼

?????????????

Vignettes tirées de la bande-dessinée « Tempête sur Bangui », de Didier Kassai, La Boîte à Bulles/Amnesty International, 2015.

Films screenings & debates – « DAYS OF HOPE » in CEDEJ Khartoum

In order to further promote academic exchanges, CEDEJ Khartoum is launching a series of documentary films screenings and debates.

In recent years, several documentaries dealing with key themes of interest to CEDEJ Khartoum – Sudan, the 2011 separation, migration issues, the Arab world, etc. – were produced. The content of these films, the approach chosen by the director, as well as the use of video in relation to academic research, are all topics of interest for our PhD students and researchers.

We were pleased to organize our first screening (01/03/2016):

“DAYS OF HOPE”,

by the Danish director Ditte Haarlov Johnsen

 

“DAYS OF HOPE” (2013, 74 min) – Every year thousands of Africans leave their families behind and risk their lives in hope of a better life. “Days of Hope” brings us close to these people, providing an inside look at the struggles these emigrants face.

Dr Kasia GRABSKA and Dr Azza AZIZ, anthropologists with interest in migration issues, lead an after-screening discussion of the film.

CONFERENCE IN KHARTOUM – Migration and Exile in the Horn of Africa, State of knowledge and current debates

AfficheThe conference « Migration and Exile in the Horn of Africa. State of Knowledge and Current Debates » was held on November 17-18th in Khartoum.

During this two-day conference, about forty researchers have presented their empirical approaches on the issue of migration in the Horn of Africa. This event was jointly organized by CEDEJ Khartoum, CFEE Addis Ababa and the University of Khartoum.

The recent period is characterized by increasing internal migrations and by a growing number of displaced persons in the sub-region, especially in Somalia, Ethiopia and Sudan. At the same time, the number of shipwrecks in the Mediterranean Sea involving migrants coming from the Horn of Africa has tragically climbed. The issue of migration, which today largely captures the attention of media and politicians, has been widely studied by African and European researchers specialized on the Horn of Africa.

In addition to providing scientific approaches on the migratory processes, the conference « Migration and Exile in the Horn of Africa » gave us the possibility to shift and re-center the analysis on the Horn of Africa.

Programme – Migration and Exile in the Horn of Africa

IMG_9587IMG_9585David Ambrosetti, Director of CFEE in Addis AbabaIMG_9600Pr Ahmed Mohamed Suliman, Vice-Chancellor of the University of KhartoumIMG_9595 IMG_9596 IMG_9602 IMG_9604 IMG_9605Dr. Samia Abu Kashawa, Ministry of Higher Education and Scientific Research IMG_9610Bruno Aubert, Ambassador of France in SudanIMG_9616 IMG_9620Alice Franck, Coordinator of CEDEJ-KhartoumIMG_9647Ahmed M. Gamal Eldin, Associate Professor of Development and Migration in Ahfad UniversityIMG_9642 IMG_9664Thomas Osmond, CFEEIMG_9690Ali Khosroshahi, UNHCRIMG_9693 IMG_9706 IMG_9717Catherine Dom, WIDE EthiopiaIMG_9722Katarzyna Grabska, the Graduate Institute in GenevaIMG_9727Clara Lecadet, EHESS

IMG_9745Katherine Rehberg, UNHCRIMG_9754 IMG_9755 IMG_9765Azza Yacoub, SOAS LondonIMG_9767 IMG_9769 IMG_9774 IMG_9783Mohamed ABDEL SALAM Babiker, University of Khartoum IMG_9791Azza Yacoub and Omar Ismael Mahamoud (CERD Djibouti)IMG_9795Benoit Gaudin, University of Addis Ababa and IRDIMG_9685Maysa Ayoub, AUC
IMG_9634Netsereab ANDOM, University of KhartoumIMG_9798
IMG_9800Peter Miller (Paris 8) and Amina Said Chire (University of Djibouti)IMG_9806Marion Guillaume, Samuel HallIMG_9811Griet Steel, Utrecht University (The Netherlands) and Catholic University Leuven (Belgium)IMG_9814 IMG_9840Géraldine Pinauldt, CFEEIMG_9849 IMG_9857 IMG_9873IMG_9880

Our partners for this event:

IFMAEDIurmisPrintLogo WIDE Canwordmark_colourmekelle universityDjiboutiuni of pretoriaiomNGpGunQFZERLf-3Cqx2iIFhIhUmHTjMGQ0XPen6VkZAunhcrAUFSH Logoird

MIGRATIONS – Dr Catherine WIHTOL DE WENDEN in Khartoum

On November 14th, CEDEJ Khartoum has organized a documentary screening, followed by a discussion with the renowned Researcher specialized on migrations issues, Dr Catherine WIHTOL DE WENDEN.

picture-115 Dr Catherine WIHTOL DE WENDEN holds a Ph.D. in political science from Sciences Po. She is a regular consultant for the OECD, the European Commission, UNHCR, and the Council of Europe. She is the Chair of the Research Committee on Migrations of the International Society of Sociology since 2002; she is a member of the Commission nationale de déontologie de la sécurité from 2003 to 2011; she is a member of the editorial boards of Hommes et migrations, Migrations  société, and Esprit. She is a lawyer and a political scientist. Her research focuses on the relationship between migrations and politics in France, migration flows, migration policies and citizenship in Europe and in the rest of the world.

For her visit in CEDEJ-K, we screened the documentary « Time to look at girls: migrants in Bangladesh and Ethiopia »(directed by Marco SPERONI, 31 minutes – 2015), produced and researched by Katarzyna GRABSKA, Nicoletta DEL FRANCO and Marina DE REGT.

« Time to look at girls: migrants in Bangladesh and Ethiopia »

Based on research funded by the Swiss Network of International Studies, Girl Effect Ethiopia, Terre des Hommes, University of Sussex, UK and the Feminist Review Trust

The increasing number of girls who move to cities is a momentous global change
Why are adolescent girls migrating and what happens to them?
How are their families and close ones affected?
What are the constraints and opportunities linked to migration for adolescent girls?
Bangladesh and Ethiopia are two examples of countries where girls’ independent migration is on the rise. This film explores the circumstances, decision-making, experiences and consequences of migration for adolescent girls in Bangladesh and Ethiopia. It is based on a research project “Time to look at girls: adolescent girls’ migration and development” (January 2014-December 2015), that explores the links between migration of adolescent girls and economic, social and political factors that trigger their movements. It shows the agency and choices being made by adolescent girls in their diverse migration experiences.

More migrants move within their own country or region than migrate to Northern countries. Bangladesh and Ethiopia have been experiencing increasing high rates of the migration of adolescent girls to work. In Bangladesh they are found for example in garment and other manufacturing industries; working as maids; or in beauty parlours. In Ethiopia, migrant girls are mainly escaping early marriages, seeking better living conditions, or aspiring to continue their education. Most of them take up paid work as maids or sex workers.

The film is based on four parallel stories about the trajectories of migration of adolescent girls in Bangladesh and in Ethiopia. In Bangladesh, the film portrays Lota and Sharmeen who are employed in garment factories. In Ethiopia, the documentary follows the lives of Tigist and Helen, two internal migrant girls, who end up in sex work. This beautifully shot film provides space for the powerful voices of the migrant girls who speak about their own circumstances, experiences, dreams for the future.

Breaking away from the dominant focus on girls as victims of trafficking, this film gives evidence of the resilience, creativity and agency of young migrants girls who faced with difficult choices.

The documentary screening was followed by a discussion, in the presence of Katarzyna GRABSKA*, with  Dr Catherine WIHTOL DE WENDEN.

We also had the great pleasure to have with us Dr. Hassan EL HAJ ALI, Dean of the Faculty of Economic and Social Sciences in the University of Khartoum.

 

*Dr Katarzyna GRABSKA is a Project Coordinator at the Global Migration Centre. She holds a BSc in International Relations from the London School of Economics and an MA in International Affairs and Conflict management from the Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies. Her research interests focus on inter-linkages between conflict, forced displacement, gender, generations and rights. She has received her PhD in Development Studies/Anthropology from the Institute of Development Studies (IDS) at the University of Sussex, UK. Her research focuses on social transformations in the context of forced displacement and return among southern Sudanese refugees. She is particularly interested in intersections of power, gender identities and gender and generational relations in forced displacement situations and the impact of (forced) migration on youth.