Archives de catégorie : Research

Sudan Archive Visiting Library Fellowship, Durham University, 2018

This residential fellowship (Apr-June 2018) carries a small grant, accommodation and meals, and is a valuable research opportunity for doctoral students studying in Sudan, South Sudan, or the wider East Africa region, and whose research would be significantly supported by two months Sudan University at Durham University. More details are provided in the notice.

 

Sudan Archive Visiting Library Fellowship

Applications are welcomed from doctoral students studying Sudan, South Sudan, or the wider East Africa region, whose research would be significantly supported by two months’ study of materials held in the Sudan Archive at Durham University. The Fellowship will commence in April 2018.

The Sudan Archive was founded in 1957, the year after Sudanese independence, to collect and preserve the papers of administrators from the Sudan Political Service, missionaries, sol diers, business men, doctors, agriculturalists, teachers and others who had served or lived in the Sudan (now Sudan and South Sudan) during the Anglo Egyptian Condominium (1898 – 1955). There is also a significant amount of Mahdist material , papers relating to the military campaigns of the 1880s and 1890s, and also the post – independence period up to the present day. The Archive holds substantial numbers of papers relating to Egypt and African states bordering on Sudan and South Sudan. Most of the material is in English, with a small amount in Arabic. A summary of the collection is available online at https://www.dur.ac.uk/library/asc/sudan .

The Fellowship entitles the holder to full access to departmental and other University facilities such as Computing and Information Services, the University Library, and of course the Sudan Archive. The Fellowship carries a modest grant of £300, but also includes accommodation and all meals for the duration of the Fellowship. The Fellow will reside at Grey College during the Easter term 23 April-22 June 2018. The Fellow will also be encouraged to participate with the activities of the university’s Centre for Contemporary African History https://centreforcontemporaryafricanhistory.com.

Applicants should send a CV (of no more than 2 pages) and a two to three-page outline of their proposed research. Applicants should also arrange at the same time for their academic supervisor to send (directly) an academic reference supporting their application. These submissions should preferably be made by e-mail, and must arrive by 17:00 GMT Friday 1 December 2017.

The Gordon Memorial College Trust Fund will cover the international travel costs of successful applicants who are citizens of Sudan/South Sudan and who are resident in Sudan, South Sudan or a neighbouring country.

pg.library@durham.ac.uk

Sudan Archive Visiting Library Fellowship, Palace Green Library, Palace Green, Durham, DH1 3RN, United Kingdom

« Le Soudan, pays de destination? Le cas des Syriens arrivés après 2011 à Khartoum »

CEDEJ Khartoum and Observatoire de l’Afrique de l’Est are our pleasure to share with you the latest report of the Observatoire de l’Afrique de l’Est, written by Alice Koumurian: « Le Soudan, pays de destination? Le cas des Syriens arrivés après 2011 à Khartoum », Note d’actualité n°3.

Arrivée d’un stagiaire

Le CEDEJ Khartoum est heureux  de vous annoncer l’arrivée de Vladimir Cayol. Il sera présent au CEDEJ jusqu’au 31 mars 2018. Il travaillera sur la mise en oeuvre du processus de Khartoum. Il tachera dans le cadre d’une publication à venir de comprendre comment ce programme se met en place à l’échelle locale et comment se coordonnent les différents acteurs chargés de le mettre en oeuvre.

Field notebook: fieldwork in Sudan about ritual animal death

As part of their joint research program “Ritual animal death: circulations of standards and of representations. Comparative approach between France, Bulgaria (Balkans) and Sudan”, Alice Franck, Geographer and Coordinator of CEDEJ Khartoum, and two other researchers – Jean Gardin, Geographer and Assistant professor in Paris I Pantheon-Sorbonne University, and Olivier Givre, Anthropologist and Assistant professor in Lyon 2 University – have conducted a fieldwork in Khartoum, from August 20th to September 3rd, on the topic of ritual animal death.

For this purpose, they have met with a wide range of Sudanese actors: livestock traders, butchers, slaughterers, exporters, organizations in charge of the establishment of standards/norms (health or religious), charitable organizations, as well as veterinary services.

CEDEJ Khartoum has supported their fieldwork in Sudan.

Continuer la lecture de Field notebook: fieldwork in Sudan about ritual animal death

Fieldwork in Sudan social protection for Sudanese transnational families, a fieldnote by Ester Serra Mingot

A fieldnote by Ester Serra Mingot.

As part of the Marie Curie Initial Training Network (ITN), TRANSMIC (Transnational Migration, Citizenship and the Circulation of Rights and Responsibilities), I am conducting my PhD on “Transnational social protection: How Sudanese migrants in the Netherlands and the United Kingdom and their families in Sudan make use of social protection, locally and transnationally”.

This joint PhD project, between the University of Maastricht (Netherlands) and the University of Aix-Marseille (France), runs from 2014 until 2017.

During the course of the fieldwork in Sudan (mostly Khartoum and Omdurman), from August 3rd to October 16th 2016, I conducted ethnographic research with the families of the migrants I had previously met and interviewed in the Netherlands and the United Kingdom (UK).

Continuer la lecture de Fieldwork in Sudan social protection for Sudanese transnational families, a fieldnote by Ester Serra Mingot

« Stories from the streets of Khartoum », a fieldnote by Mai AZZAM

Stories from the streets of Khartoum

By Mai Azzam

Mai Azzam  is a junior anthropologist graduated from the University of Khartoum. Mai holds two master degrees in Anthropology. The first one is from the University of Khartoum 2010 and the latest is an  M.Phil. in anthropology of development from  the University of Bergen. Her research interests are on youth, Islam, and political anthropology. She worked with youth movements in Khartoum, Sudan, to explore more about youth role in public life in Khartoum. Mai worked in Khartoum as a junior researcher at CEDEJ (Centre d'Études et de Documentation Économiques, Juridiques et sociales) for three years. She also worked in different capacities with local NGOs in Khartoum and developed her activist personality.
Introduction
This is a series of life stories of young motivated people in Khartoum. It is a direct reflection from ethnographic material collected in 2015.  I spent six month for data collection among two charity associations in Khartoum namely Sadagaat and Shari’ Al Hawadith. Each association has started via informal methods and grows to fill a gap left by government privatization policies and investments on war and defense rather than social services.

Continuer la lecture de « Stories from the streets of Khartoum », a fieldnote by Mai AZZAM

CEDEJ Khartoum’s research activities on migration

In 2015 and 2016, CEDEJ Khartoum particularly invested in migration issues through different scientific events and the support of several researchers/PhD students’ fieldwork in Sudan.

 

IMG_9604A scientific conference, organized by CEDEJ Khartoum, CFEE in Addis Ababa and the University of Khartoum entitled “Migration and Exile in the Horn of Africa: State of Knowledge and Current Debates” was held in November 2015 in Khartoum: for two days this major event brought together about forty researchers specialized in the field of migrations in the Horn of Africa.

♦♦♦

picture-115Dr Catherine Wihtol de Wenden is a renowned specialist on migration.

During her visit in CEDEJ Khartoum, we screened the documentary « Time to look at girls: migrants in Bangladesh and Ethiopia »(directed by Marco Speroni, 31 minutes – 2015), produced and researched by Katarzyna Grabska, Nicoletta Del Franco and Marina De Regt.

Affiche-film2

♦♦♦

  • Dr Katarzyna Grabska’s field research on patterns of return and displacement movements of South-Sudanese en route to Sudan/Ethiopia as a result of the civil conflict in the South.

In January 2016, CEDEJ Khartoum organized the book launch of her book « Gender, Home & Identity: Nuer repatriation to Southern Sudan » (James Currey, 2014) at the University of Khartoum.cover photo

♦♦♦

  • Film screening/debate about migration in March 2016: “Days of hope”, by the Danish director Ditte Haarlov Johnsen

“DAYS OF HOPE” (2013, 74 min) – Every year thousands of Africans leave their families behind and risk their lives in hope of a better life. “Days of Hope” brings us close to these people, providing an inside look at the struggles these emigrants face.

Dr Kasia GRABSKA and Dr Azza AZIZ, anthropologists with interest in migration issues, lead an after-screening discussion of the film.

♦♦♦

« The border between the Central African Republic and Sudan has always been porous and the Central African’s presence in Darfur is old. However, the migration of Central African in Khartoum seems to be more recent and linked with the troubles since the putsches of François Bozize and Michel Djotodia. This small community has still a low visibility and has not been studied since now. I focus my study on why and how they left the Central African Republic and came into Sudan. I try to find which networks lead them up to Khartoum and help to their integration. I also ask the question of the status of these migrants. This last point reveals a link between the refugees and the students. Actually, the main network for the Central African to integrate them in Khartoum seems to be the International University of Africa. » – Khadidja Medani

♦♦♦

  • Miralyne Zeghnoune’s ongoing fieldwork on Sudanese migrants in France and in Sudan.

Miralyne Zeghnoune, a master student, is currently collecting data on Sudanese migrants’ conditions in France (migratory route, reasons for leaving, future projects, connections with the family in Sudan, etc.). After two-month fieldwork in France (Paris, Lyon, Calais), she will study in Khartoum these migrants’ family and entourage (initial project, administrative procedures, contacts with the migrant, etc.).

♦♦♦

  • Alice Koumurian’s fieldwork on Syrian migrants (after 2011) in Khartoum.

Undeniably, the phenomenon of the increasing flow of Syrians coming to Sudan, resulting from the closing of the Turkish border coupled with the facility of entrance to Sudan due to the fact that they do not need a visa to enter Sudan and permission of stay is not unduly complicated, also requires the collection and analysis of data.

♦♦♦

 

Field notebook – Fieldwork in Sudan about ritual animal death

As part of a joint research program “Ritual animal death: circulations of norms and of representations. Comparative approach between France, Bulgaria (Balkans) and Sudan”, we formed a team…
  • Alice Franck, Geographer and Coordinator of CEDEJ Khartoum
  • Jean Gardin, Geographer and Assistant professor in Paris I Pantheon-Sorbonne University, and
  • Olivier Givre, Anthropologist and Assistant professor in Lyon 2 University
…and conducted fieldwork in Khartoum, from 20th of August to the 3rd of September, related to the topic of ritual animal death.
During the course of this fieldwork, we were privileged to meet with a wide range of Sudanese actors: livestock traders, butchers, slaughterers, exporters, organizations in charge of the setting up of standards/norms (health or religious), Islamic NGOs, as well as veterinary services.
CEDEJ Khartoum supported our fieldwork in Sudan which was the third and final terrain complementing our comprehensive programme of comparative research characterized by a special focus on Aïd el Adha

Initially, we contrasted the concept “ritual death” to a hypothetical death devoid of metaphysical sense”. While binary, this dichotomy makes sense in view of the current debates on ritual animal death specifically in France. However comparative work in Bulgaria, France and Sudan demonstrates, through the diversity of practices and discourses, that the “ritual” and the “profane” exist on a continuum.
From this perspective, we consider other variations deserve to be studied in order to better analyze the circulation of norms that surround animal death such as the distinction between industrial and domestic slaughter. The fact that animal slaughter has become an increasingly technical process raises a lot of concerns for our interlocutors in France, Bulgaria and Sudan. We think that the dichotomy “industrial VS domestic slaughter” should not be too acute because the term “domestic” itself needs to be interrogate since its exact definition remains ambiguous.
Due to a focus on normative framework, we were interested in familiarizing ourselves with the role of the professional bodies that adopt, design and perpetuate norms and standards. We observed that this “space of norms and standards” is very hierarchical and well structured at the international level, (with the World Organization for Animal Health), at the national level (for example, in Sudan, with the Halal Council, the office in charge of halal norms), and at the municipal level (municipal veterinary).
We equally focus on exploring the differences in perception related to notions of “animal welfare”, which have been defined by veterinaries and various international organizations. Contrary to France – where the concern with “animal welfare” is not exclusive to pet but also pertains to livestock -, in Bulgaria it remains confined to the former. Significantly the issue in Sudan does not reach a level of public concern.
Furthermore, we found it particularly relevant to study the relationship between norms and trust. We cursorily noted that the loss of trust in industrial slaughter is strong in France, weak in Bulgaria and negligible in Sudan: respecting the hierarchy of GDP per capita, the duration of urbanization and of the level of industrialization within the meat market. However the multiplicity of contexts is highly relevant since it contributes to mitigating or even contradicting this evolutionary pattern. This makes for a more fluid reading of the heterogeneous manifestations of norms and standards.
Inter-subjective trust stands in opposition to impersonal norms, however multiple interviews expose a variant of trust in relation to the norms (eating organic or eating halal); which may in turn be subverted by the further interrogation of what constitutes “organic” or “halal”? The latter trust is inscribed in a specific label.
The question of trust equally posits itself in our findings related to Eid sacrifices which take place in the country of the South through the interventions of Islamic NGOs. The issue of delegation is highly charged since it bears the onus of sacrificing on behalf of another on a sacred plane. In the western context where the majority of donors is to be found, the issue of how industrial slaughter houses operate, directs the choices of a Muslim clientele in opting for a distant slaughter.
Departing from a study which was essentially dealing with the sacred and non sacred aspects of animal death, we were quikly confronted with the salience of the norms. We do not profess to be offering a novel contribution, however our contribution offers a clearing for further interrogations surrounding the status of the standardization of animal death.

Our next step: A workshop on the topic of animal death – open to the public – will be held on Friday 27th, November 2015 (9 am – 1 pm), at the Institute of Geography, in Paris 1 University.

Programme Mort Animale 27 novembre 2015

Mastaba

The following picture was taken during a night slaughter in the mastaba (about 200 bulls and camels and 600 goats and sheeps slaughtered between 11 pm and 7 am on a slab by a hundred butcher boys), in Khartoum. If taken (generally undercover) in a northern-american or european industrial slaughterhouse, this kind of pictures is often used to accuse meat-eaters and meat-producers of cruelty toward animals. But at the same time, we’d like to point that another-wiser-interpretation is possible : even in rude conditions (blood, direct vision…) the animals are partly cooperative in the process. Even if they are afraid and must be dragged by force, they show a confidence in the men’s activity. We’d like to impute that to the intensity of physical and emotional exchanges during the whole life of the animal, with humans, in a semi-industrial and semi-traditionnal process.

Thesis – « Ethnographies of water management in Tuti (Khartoum, Sudan) and Caño de Loro (Cartagena, Colombia). Comparing history, locality and politics in urban anthropology », By Luisa ARANGO

« Ethnographies of water management in Tuti (Khartoum, Sudan) and Caño de Loro (Cartagena, Colombia). Comparing history, locality and politics in urban anthropology« 

Tuti L. Arango (2)
Tuti – L. Arango

« Ethnographies de la gestion de l’eau à Tuti (Khartoum, Soudan) et Caño de Loro (Carthagène, Colombie). Histoire, localité et politique dans une perspective d’anthropologie urbaine comparée »

Under the supervision of Dr Barbara Casciarri

The thesis defense took place on Friday, November 27th, 2015 at 9 am at the University Paris 8, 2 rue de la Liberté, 93200, Saint Denis in the Hall of theses, Deleuze area (Building A, 1st floor).

The jury was composed of:
AYEB Habib, Senior Lecturer in Geography at the University Paris 8

Alain BERTHO, Professor of Anthropology at the University of Paris 8

David BLANCHON, Professor of Geography at the University Paris Ouest-Nanterre.

Barbara CASCIARRI, Lecturer in Anthropology at the University Paris 8 (supervisor)

Eric DENIS, Geographer, Director of research at CNRS (rapporteur)

Aline HEMOND, Professor of Anthropology at the University of Picardie Jules Verne (rapporteur)

Mauro VAN AKEN, Professor of Anthropology at the University of Milano Bicocca

Summary:

Tuti L. Arango
Tuti – L. Arango

At the turn of the twentieth century, numerous cities such as Cartagena (Colombia) and Khartoum (Sudan), adopted a centralized technical and administrative model for the management of drinking water. Associated since its construction to planned urban development projects, the water network constitutes a political technology and becomes a landmark of urban spatiality, for politicians as well as for technicians and urban dwellers. The compared analysis of access strategies, daily usage, and the role of water in the imagination of two populations with an ambiguous urban status – Caño de Loro (Cartagena) and Tuti (Khartoum) – allows us to approach the social complexity of contemporary cities in the South. The comparison supposes a reflexive orientation that leads us, over and beyond the socio-political dynamics of each context, to critically consider our categories of analysis. In the first part the water network is contextualized in the history of each city, where its recent apparition and setting up rests upon the reinforcement or creation of dense power relations, as well as a new conception of nature, particularly of water. Such relational and political features lead to, in the second part, an understanding of how the materiality of water and its sharing produces particular localities within the urban space. Therefore, the analysis of relations between public and private spheres through everyday water exchanges lets us discuss the relevance of the notion of “collective management” of resources in Cartagena and Khartoum. The third part considers the mechanisms draw on by different actors within the particular context of urban planning to negotiate their margin of action on land and water. It highlights the political dimension of identity categories as well as the transformative power of individual and collective actions in situations where resource management is crossed with individual, local, national, and global logics at the same time.

 

Résumé:
Au tournant du XXe siècle, un modèle technique et administratif centralisé est adopté pour l’approvisionnement en eau de consommation dans de nombreuses villes de la planète, dont Carthagène (Colombie) et Khartoum (Soudan). Dès lors, associé aux projets de développement urbain planifié, le réseau hydrique se constitue comme une technologie politique et devient un marqueur de la spatialité et des modes de vie urbains, autant pour les administrateurs que pour les techniciens et les populations citadines. L’analyse comparée des stratégies d’accès, des usages quotidiens et de l’imaginaire lié à l’eau de deux populations insulaires dont le caractère urbain s’avère problématique – Caño de Loro (Carthagène) et Tuti (Khartoum) – permet d’aborder la complexité sociale des villes du Sud contemporaines. La comparaison comporte dans ce sens une orientation critique et conduit, au-delà de l’étude des dynamiques sociopolitiques propres à chaque contexte, à interroger les diverses catégories d’analyse utilisées au cours de ce travail. Dans la première partie de la thèse, le réseau hydrique est restitué dans l’histoire de chaque agglomération où sa mise en place, relativement récente, repose à la fois sur le renforcement, voire sur l’émergence, d’importants rapports de pouvoir et sur une transformation dans la conception de la nature, et plus particulièrement de l’eau. Ce caractère relationnel et politique du réseau ouvre la voie, dans une deuxième partie, à la compréhension de la façon dont la matérialité de l’eau et ses échanges contribuent à la production de « localités » particulières au sein de l’espace urbain. Ainsi, l’analyse des relations entre espaces publics et privés par le biais du partage quotidien de l’eau amène à discuter la pertinence de la notion de « gestion collective » des ressources à Carthagène et à Khartoum. La troisième partie aborde les mécanismes mobilisés par différents acteurs, dans le contexte particulier de la planification urbaine, pour négocier leur marge d’action sur l’eau et la terre. Elle met en lumière la dimension politique des catégories d’appartenance ainsi que le pouvoir transformateur des actions collectives et individuelles dans des situations où la gestion des ressources est traversée par de logiques, à la fois individuelles, locales, nationales et globales.

Metropolisation and in between Spaces in the Greater Khartoum – New Research Program

The Cedej – Khartoum is starting a new research program in partnership with the University of Khartoum and the University Paris 8 with the support of the AUF (Agence Universitaire de la Francophonie). The project will start in march 2015.

This research project aims to analyze the stakeholder’s plays and the power relations revolving around the rural-urban linkages inside the Greater Khartoum conurbation. The diversity of those peripheral areas under permanent recharacterizations is the starting point of this project.

The program supervisors are: Dr Alice Franck (CEDEJ Khartoum, University Paris 1), Dr Munzul Assal (University of Khartoum), Dr Barbara Casciarri (University Paris 8)

You will find more details in French and  in the documents attached

METROPOLISATION ET ESPACES « D’ENTRE-DEUX »

Metropolisation and in between spaces

Seminar – Observatory of the Horn Of Africa

A workshop organized by the Observatory of the Horn of Africa (LAM, DAS, IRSEM) was held on 24 November in Paris and supported by the CEDEJ Khartoum. The focus was on politic, religion and conflicts in the Horn of Africa. Three researchers of the CEDEJ have participated to the workshop: Alice Franck the coordinator of the  CEDEJ Khartoum was the president of one of the panels, Raphaelle Chevrillon Guibert an associate researcher at CEDEJ presented a paper:  « The Sudanese Islamist in front of the economical crises post separation »,  and Azza Mustafa Ahmed an PhD student associate at CEDEJ presented a paper « Islam and political parties in Sudan : The National Islamic Front ».

You will find further information in the document attached.

Programme Séminaire Observatoire Corne Afrique 24 Novembre 2014

 

Second Workshop of Andromaque Project – Sudan

The Sudanese team of the Andromaque project held a second Workshop in Khartoum in the reading room of the CEDEJ, on Sunday 2 March, from 9:00 am to 13:00 pm.

The Andromaque Sudan Team gathered  European and Sudanese researchers, whose main background is social anthropology, and has recently integrated 2 researchers with a law background. The members present at the workshop of the research team were: Barbara Casciarri (anthropologist, University Paris 8 Saint Denis, France, team’s scientific coordinator);  Munzoul Assal and Musa Adam Abdul-Jalil (Department of Anthropology, UoK);  Mohamed Abdessalam Babiker (Department of Law, UoK); Philippe Gout (PhD in Law, University Paris II Panthéon Assas, France) and Mai Azzam ( PhD student in anthropology, Khartoum, Sudan). Alice Franck, the coordinator of the CEDEJ in Khartoum was also present during the workshop.

For further information about the Andromaque project you can refer to the post about the first workshop of Andromaque.

First Workshop of Andromaque Project – Sudan at CEDEJ, Khartoum

The Sudanese team of the Andromaque project held a first Workshop in Khartoum in the reading room of the CEDEJ, on Sunday 24th November, from 10:00 am to 17:00 pm.

Andromaque is the acronyme for Anthropologie du Droit dans les Mondes Musulmans Africains et Asiatiques (Law Anthropologie in the African and Asian Muslim Worlds), a scientific research project supported by the French ANR (National Agency for Research) and led by Baudoin Dupret, director of the Centre Jacques Berque (Rabat, Morocco). It was launched in 2011 and will be achieved at the end of 2014. Its aim is to inquiry the relation between different sources of law (mainly customary and Islamic law) starting from the observation of actual legal practices and related social dynamics among Muslim groups in various regional contexts (Morocco and Sudan in Africa, India and Indonesia in Asia). It is coordinated with Prometee, a project whose aims and issues focus on the same approach and which analyzes similar situations of “legal pluralism” in Mauritania, Algeria and Lebanon.

Andromaque wokshop on 24/11/2013 in the CEDEJ center of Khartoum.(Musa Adam Abdul-Jalil 2013)
Andromaque workshop on 24/11/2013 in the CEDEJ center of Khartoum. (Musa Adam Abdul-Jalil 2013) 

The Andromaque Sudan Team gathered 6 European and Sudanese researchers, whose main background is social anthropology, and has recently integrated 2 researchers with a law background. The members of the research team are: Barbara Casciarri (anthropologist, University Paris 8 Saint Denis, France, team’s scientific coordinator); François Ireton (socio-economist, CNRS, France); Yazid Ben-Hounet (anthropologist, Laboratoire d’Anthropologie Sociale, France); Munzoul Assal and Musa Adam Abdul-Jalil (Department of Anthropology, UoK); Zahir M. Abdelkarim (anthropologist, PhD candidate at the Max Planck Institute, Germany); Mohamed Abdessalam Babiker (Department of Law, UoK) and Philippe Gout (PhD in Law, University Paris II Panthéon Assas, France).

The main topics tackled by the research team are: issues of land property and transmission in contemporary Sudan (pastoral collective “tribal” lands; agricultural land along the Nile Valley; residential land in the peripheral areas of Greater Khartoum); processes of conflicts’ legal resolution in various contexts (“informal courts” in IDPs areas around the capital town; mechanisms for settlement of disputes between farmers and pastoralists in the Eastern region; trials in “state courts” of Khartoum); overviews of the evolution of legal system(s) in Sudan concerning mainly land ownership, customary and statutory courts, and the relation between international law and shari’a law concerning the definition of minorities.

The aim of the workshop was to present the evolution of the various fieldwork cases, to establish a stronger relation between the social anthropology and the law approaches to legal practices and systems in contemporary Sudan and to link them to the wider common questions raised by the Andromaque project as a whole. The participants to the workshop also discussed the project of an edited book, that should be published soon after the end of the research program (2014) and would hopefully represent an interesting contribution for an interdisciplinary insight to this domain (legal practices and normative law systems) that is so crucial for understanding social dynamics in contemporary Sudan. Another meeting of the Andromaque Sudan Team would be held between February and March 2014, whose aim will be both the follow up of the editorial project and the organization of a final open workshop for the end of 2014.

Barbara Casciarri