Archives par mot-clé : Anthropology

Transient student in CEDEJ Khartoum – Max MUNCH

CEDEJ Khartoum is currently hosting Max Münch, a student in Anthropology at the University of Bayreuth. For his Master’s thesis, he conducted three months of fieldwork in a Quranic school in Northern Kordofan. In an immersive process, the research was based upon the multi-sensorial focal points of didactics, socialization and embodied knowledge. He participated in the daily learning routine to get access to the social and experiential ways of teaching, learning and knowing.

© Max Munch

Research Assistant « Tribal Diplomacy in Kordofan » – University Bayreuth

Research Assistant « Tribal Diplomacy in Kordofan » (Univ. Bayreuth)

Date: 01.01.2017 – 31.12.2017
Deadline: 10.12.2016

The Chair of Anthropology, University of Bayreuth, offers a one year contract on the German scale TVL13/50% for preparatory research leading to a PhD on « Tribal Diplomacy in Kordofan » to start at the end of 2016. The eligible candidate holds an above average MA in Anthropology or a related discipline and has a working competence in Arabic.

Please send your application to <ethnologie@uni-bayreuth.de> till December 10, 2016.

Contact: Prof. Beck

PUBLICATION – Blood and the City, Animal Representations and Urban (Dis)orders during the ‘Feast of the Sacrifice’ in Istanbul and Khartoum, by Alice Franck, Jean Gardin and Olivier Givre

CEDEJ Khartoum is pleased to announce the following recent publication:

Blood and the City

Animal Representations and Urban (Dis)orders during the ‘Feast of the Sacrifice’ in Istanbul and Khartoum

By Alice Franck, Jean Gardin and Olivier Givre

Volume 11 / 2016, Anthropology of the Middle East

Abstract

Based on comparative fieldwork studies of the Muslim ‘Feast of the Sacrifice’, this article questions the places, shapes and stakes of ritual animal death in the urban space. The examples of Istanbul (Turkey) and Khartoum (Sudan) illustrate different but comparable perceptions, practices and management of a ritual event simultaneously associated with religious traditions and confronted with deep transformations in urbanised and globalised societies. Between ritual normalcy and controversial practice, sacrifice in the city is not reducible to a religious matter but addresses at once spatial, social and cultural issues, informed by economic and political stakes. Through a ritual performance and its manifold aspects, the article explores the multiple and evolving representations of the place and role of animals (and their death) in an urban context.

CONFERENCE- Metropolization and Liminal Spaces in Greater Khartoum, October 30th, 2016 at the University of Khartoum

copy-of-dsc_0274CEDEJ Khartoum was pleased to organize the conference « Metropolization and Liminal Spaces in Greater Khartoum » on Sunday 30th October, 2016 at the University of Khartoum.

This conference heralded the end of a two-year research programme entitled « Metro 2 Sudan » and conducted by a Sudanese/international team of researchers and students from the CEDEJ Khartoum and from the University of Khartoum.

This research programme has received support from the AUF (Agence Universitaire de la Francophonie) as well as several other partners (Paris 8 University/LAVUE, the French ministry of Foreign Affairs/Campus France and the Sudanese ministry of Higher Education).

Mohamed Abdelsalam Babiker
Abdelghaffar Mohamed Ahmed & Mohamed Abdelsalam Babiker

« Metro 2 Sudan » aimed at analyzing the interplay of actors and power relationships built around these areas that have a rural/urban interface in the Greater Khartoum. These spaces exist at various scales and in various inter-crossed parameters: functionally and economically, it refers to residential, industrial, agricultural, livestock or of « wasteland » areas; socio-spatially and in terms of housing, it refers to luxury compounds, former IDP camps, rural villages which were recently encompassed in the capital; administratively and legally, it refers to urban neighborhoods, rural or urban administrative units; socio-culturally and anthropologically, reconfigurations are varied, in regards to ethnic, tribal, religious and statutory affiliations.

[9:30-10 am] – INTRODUCTION

Alice FRANCK – Programme Coordinator (CEDEJ Khartoum/University Paris 1): METRO2 objectives, participants, partnerships, fieldworks

Barbara CASCIARRI – Co-coordinator (University Paris 8 – LAVUE): ethnographical and anthropological approaches of in-betweenness

Barbara Casciarri & Alice Franck
Barbara Casciarri & Alice Franck

[10-12 pm] – PANEL 1: IN-BETWEENNESS: THE WATERSHED OF 2011 AND THE CREATION OF TWO SUDANS. SOUTHERN-SUDANESES BEFORE AND AFTER SEPARATION

The first panel focuses on the situation of Southerners (living in Northern Sudan, notably in Greater Khartoum) after the separation of South Sudan. Though, more generally, we can question whether this major political event constitutes a globally meaningful and all-explanatory watershed, nonetheless it is a matter of fact that this category of people has more visibly been targeted by the post-2011 dynamics of change and marginalization. The panel papers share a twofold focus: first, the one on 2011 as a temporal dividing-line bringing to new configuration of Southerners who willingly or not passed from a status to another; second, the variety of in-between spaces in which they are caught as far as citizenship, territorial and land access, social relations and cultural perceptions are concerned.

 President: Mohamed BABIKER / Chairperson: Idris SALIM EL-HASSAN

  • Azza AHMED ABDEL AZIZThe In-betweenness of Southerners in Khartoum: Recasting Different Registers of Status through Narrative and Experience
  • Mohamed AG BAKHIT – The ‘community’ citizenship status for Southern Sudanese in Khartoum. The case of Al-Baraka
  • Katarzyna GRABSKA – Negotiating citizenship and belonging in displacement: Nuer in Khartoum
  • Alice FRANCK – The second urban marginalization: Southerners in popular neighbourhoods of Greater Khartoum from a land property analysis
Hind Mahmoud
Hind Mahmoud
Idris Salim el-Hassan
Idris Salim el-Hassan
Alice Franck
Alice Franck

[12-1:30 pm] – **LUNCH BREAK**

[1:30-4 pm] – PANEL 2 – IN-BETWEENNESS: PLURAL EXPRESSIONS OF MATERIAL AND SYMBOLIC LIMINALITY. GEOGRAPHICAL, SOCIO-POLITICAL AND LEGAL IN-BETWEEN SPACES

 The second panel focuses on the multiplicity of contemporary contexts in which Sudanese people are living situations where the fluidity of borders makes experience a status of in-betweenness at different levels and with various effects. The panel papers are not strictly focusing on the 2011 events as a breaking point, they rather underline the variety of situations where the notion of in-betweenness may be a useful analytical tool for understanding ongoing social realities:  the relation between shifting urban and rural spaces, the transitional political arena, the identity processes influenced by marriage strategies, the legal pluralism and ambiguous land issues entangled with communities’ reconfigurations and rights.

 President: Munzul ASSAL / Chairperson: Abdelghaffar MOHAMED AHMED

  • Barbara CASCIARRI & Alice FRANCKReconfigurations of the pastoral and agricultural in-betweenness in Khartoum State. Insights on the ‘urbanization of neoliberalism’
  • Clément DESHAYES – New socio-political actors: the stakes of categorisation and political reproduction
  • Peter MILLER – Whom to marry? An ethnographic study of marriage practices and strategies amongst upper-middle class city-dwellers
  • Hind M YUSUF – The Impact of urbanization on education processes: Youth’s life strategies in Al-Fatah
  • Mohamed A BABIKER – Between Law and Practices. Rendering vulnerable displaced and stateless on issues of land and identity

 [4–4:30 pm] – **COFFEE BREAK**

[4:30–5:30 pm] – CONCLUSIONS

Stella GAYTANO – Identity

ROUNDTABLE AND DEBATE: SYNTHESIS AND PERSPECTIVES (moderator: Jean-Nicolas BACH, Coordinator of CEDEJ Khartoum)

Netsereab Andom
Netsereab Andom
Azza Ahmed Abdel Aziz
Azza Ahmed Abdel Aziz
Jean-Nicolas Bach
Jean-Nicolas Bach
Peter Miller
Stella Gaytano
Stella Gaytano
Hassan Haj Ali
Hassan Haj Ali

 

« Stories from the streets of Khartoum », a fieldnote by Mai AZZAM

Stories from the streets of Khartoum

By Mai Azzam

Mai Azzam  is a junior anthropologist graduated from the University of Khartoum. Mai holds two master degrees in Anthropology. The first one is from the University of Khartoum 2010 and the latest is an  M.Phil. in anthropology of development from  the University of Bergen. Her research interests are on youth, Islam, and political anthropology. She worked with youth movements in Khartoum, Sudan, to explore more about youth role in public life in Khartoum. Mai worked in Khartoum as a junior researcher at CEDEJ (Centre d'Études et de Documentation Économiques, Juridiques et sociales) for three years. She also worked in different capacities with local NGOs in Khartoum and developed her activist personality.
Introduction
This is a series of life stories of young motivated people in Khartoum. It is a direct reflection from ethnographic material collected in 2015.  I spent six month for data collection among two charity associations in Khartoum namely Sadagaat and Shari’ Al Hawadith. Each association has started via informal methods and grows to fill a gap left by government privatization policies and investments on war and defense rather than social services.

Continuer la lecture de « Stories from the streets of Khartoum », a fieldnote by Mai AZZAM

Research on Sudan: The British Museum and the Anthropologists’ Fund for Urgent Anthropological Research offer a second Research Fellowship in Urgent Anthropology

The British Museum and the Anthropologists’ Fund for Urgent Anthropological Research offer a second Research Fellowship in Urgent Anthropology. The Fellowship provides (non-salaried) financial support for an eighteen month period of field research and writing, with a specific focus on Sudan.

The Research Fellowship in Urgent Anthropology is designed to facilitate ethnographic research on peoples whose culture and language are currently threatened. The programme’s primary aim is to contribute to anthropological knowledge through detailed ethnography, and also if possible help the peoples being described in their particular circumstances. The British Museum is hosting the fellowship programme for three years from 2014: this is the second fellowship.

The British Museum Urgent Anthropology Fellowship Programme has a specific focus, on threatened Nile Valley communities in northern Sudan. The 20th century riverine communities of northern Sudan and Nubia have been the subject of relatively little anthropological field research, and are facing radical transformations, brought about by a variety of infrastructural developments, including dam construction, large-scale agricultural development, the arrival of mobile technologies and changing foodways. These are village communities based on subsistence agriculture and date palm cash-cropping; Arabic is widely spoken, as is Nubian.

The British Museum currently runs three ongoing archaeological research projects, at Amara West near Abri; Kawa near modern Dongola ; Dangeil near the cities of Berber and Abidiya . The first fellowship is currently held by Dr. Karin Willemse, who is focusing on the Abri area, with the following research questions:

· How do Nubians living in the Abri area, and those in the diaspora (mainly Khartoum), construct a notion of “the” Nubian community in the sense of an imagined community in the way they talk, reminiscence about the Nubian past, present and future?

· How do ‘Nubians’ thereby refer to spatial, cultural (material, visual, virtual and moral), and historical aspects of ‘Nubian-ness’ based on one Nubian core-culture?

The second fellowship will be offered to an anthropologist proposing a fieldwork project in these areas of northern Sudan, thus availing of the necessary logistical support, assistance with research permits and access to communities. Preference will be given to projects with a different focus from that of Dr. Willemse.

The Fellowship makes it possible for a budgeted project to be carried out over about 18 months: this period to include both field research and writing-up. Fellows are required to spend part of their fellowship period in the field and part in the Museum, and where they are expected to contribute to its academic life. In the Museum, the fellows will be affiliated to both the Department of Africa, Oceania and the Americas, and the Department of Ancient Egypt and Sudan.

The Fellowship will provide £30,000 to be spent over 18 months, inclusive of all costs except overheads to be borne by the Museum for time spent in London, but exclusive of salary. The Fellowships, are awarded to post-doctoral applicants by open competition without restriction of nationality or residence. Applicants should send an application comprising project proposal (maximum 4 pages) including research plan and timeline, intended outputs and budget; a CV and two letters of reference. The budget should include all personal and research expenses (within Sudan and the UK), insurance, and costs of equipment necessary for the project.

The Urgent Anthropology Fund is managed through the Royal Anthropological Institute.

Please submit applications to AOA@britishmuseum.org

Closing date is 31 July 2015.

Publication – Gender, Home and Identity: Nuer repatration to South Sudan, by Katarzyna Grabska

How and where did returning Nuer refugees make their ‘homes’ in southern Sudan? How were gender relations and identity redefined as a result of war, displacement and return to post-war communities? And how were those displaced able to recreate a sense of home, community and nation?

During the civil wars in southern Sudan (1983-2005) many of the displaced Sudanese, including many Nuer, were in refugee camps in Kenya and Ethiopia. In the aftermath of the Comprehensive Peace Agreement, they repatriated to southern Sudan. Faced with finding long-lost relatives and local expectations of ‘proper behaviour’, they often felt displaced again.
Gender, home and identityThis book follows the lives of a group of Nuer in the Greater Upper Nile region. The narratives of those displaced and those who stayed behind reveal the complexity of social change, in particular, the crucial yet relatively unconsidered transformation of gender and generational relations, and how this has impacted on state formation in what is now South Sudan.
Katarzyna Grabska is a research fellow with the Department of Anthropology and Sociology of Development at the Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies (IHEID) in Geneva. She is also an associate researcher at the CEDEJ-Khartoum.

Accreditation to supervise research – Barbara Casciarri

Barbara Casciarri, from the University Paris 8, has submitted in  last December for her accreditation to supervise research a synthesis of her research entitle « Ethnographies pastorales en « situation globale » at the University Lumières Lyon 2. This presentation is the results of 24 years of anthropology fieldwork in Morocco and Sudan.  You will find following the summary, writing in French by Barbara Casciarri, of the synthesis.

Ethnographies pastorales en « situation globale »

Ce mémoire constitue le bilan de mes recherches de terrain en anthropologie qui se sont déroulées sur une période de 24 ans (1989-2013) dans deux contextes africains (le Soudan et le Maroc), avec une focalisation constante sur la catégorie des sociétés pastorales, par un travail conjoint au sein d’équipes interdisciplinaires aux composants variés (préhistoire, sciences naturelles, géographie). Les groupes qui ont fait l’objet de mes enquêtes (Aḥāmda, Baṭāḥīn et Awlād Nūba au Soudan, Aït Unzār au Maroc) partagent un même contexte écologique  (milieux  arides  africains),  une  forte  liaison  avec  les modes  de  production  et  de  reproduction sociale  typiques du pastoralisme nomade, et certains  traits culturels qui  sont communs à  l’aire dite arabo-musulmane.  Plusieurs  thématiques  ont  caractérisé  mes  recherches  chez  ces  groupes :  les  institutions politiques  locales et  leur  rapport avec  l’Etat central ;  les  formes d’accès aux  ressources naturelles  (terre et eau) ; les formes identitaires et les idéologies ancrées dans les systèmes de parenté, les rapports de sexe ou le « paradigme tribal » ; les transformations liées aux crises écologiques, à la sédentarisation, à l’urbanisation, à l’incorporation dans un système dominé par la logique capitaliste ; les interventions d’acteurs divers pour le  développement  et  la  « modernisation ».  Dans  ce  mémoire  je  reprends  les  résultats  principaux  de  ces données ethnographiques, qui ont fait déjà l’objet de publications ponctuelles, en essayant de dépasser leur particularité. Mon  objectif  est  d’établir  une  synthèse  capable  de  souligner  les  interactions multiples  des dynamiques sociales analysées et de déceler leur redéfinition constante au sein du contexte global qui dans la conjoncture actuelle incorpore ces sociétés de petite échelle. Néanmoins,  ce mémoire  ne  veut  pas  se  limiter  à  une  revue,  par  ordre  chronologique  ou  thématique,  des données  issues de mes enquêtes et de  leur  systématisation ou  interprétation. Ce  travail est aussi guidé par l’ambition  de  développer  une  réflexion  capable  de  contribuer  au  débat  plus  large  de  l’anthropologie  du monde contemporain.

Second Workshop of Andromaque Project – Sudan

The Sudanese team of the Andromaque project held a second Workshop in Khartoum in the reading room of the CEDEJ, on Sunday 2 March, from 9:00 am to 13:00 pm.

The Andromaque Sudan Team gathered  European and Sudanese researchers, whose main background is social anthropology, and has recently integrated 2 researchers with a law background. The members present at the workshop of the research team were: Barbara Casciarri (anthropologist, University Paris 8 Saint Denis, France, team’s scientific coordinator);  Munzoul Assal and Musa Adam Abdul-Jalil (Department of Anthropology, UoK);  Mohamed Abdessalam Babiker (Department of Law, UoK); Philippe Gout (PhD in Law, University Paris II Panthéon Assas, France) and Mai Azzam ( PhD student in anthropology, Khartoum, Sudan). Alice Franck, the coordinator of the CEDEJ in Khartoum was also present during the workshop.

For further information about the Andromaque project you can refer to the post about the first workshop of Andromaque.

Fellowship – The British Museum Research Fellowship in urgent Anthropology: Sudan

The department of Africa, Oceania and the Americas offer a fellowship of eighteen month in urgent Anthropology with a specific focus on Sudan:

 

« The British Museum and the Anthropologists’ Fund for Urgent Anthropological Research offer a Research Fellowship in Urgent Anthropology.  The Fellowship provides (non-salaried) financial support for an eighteen month period of field research and writing, with a specific focus on Sudan.

The Research Fellowship in Urgent Anthropology is designed to facilitate ethnographic research on peoples whose culture and language are currently threatened. The programme’s primary aim is to contribute to anthropological knowledge through detailed ethnography, and also if possible help the peoples being described in their particular circumstances. The British Museum will host the fellowship programme for three years from 2013, during which two Fellowships will be awarded.  This advertisement refers to the first of the two British Museum Fellowships; the second fellowship will be advertised in late 2014.
The British Museum Urgent Anthropology Fellowship Programme has a specific focus, on threatened Nile Valley communities in northern Sudan.  The 20th century riverine communities of northern Sudan and Nubia have been the subject of relatively little anthropological field research, and are facing radical transformations, brought about by a variety of infrastructural developments, including dam construction, the arrival of mobile technologies and changing foodways. These are village communities based on subsistence agriculture and date palm cash-cropping; Arabic is widely spoken, as is Nubian.
The British Museum currently runs three ongoing archaeological research projects,at Amara West near Abri, Kawa near modern Dongola, Dangeil near yhe cities of Berber and Abidiya. The first fellowship will be offered to an anthropologist proposing a fieldwork project in these areas of northern Sudan, thus availing of the necessary logistical support, assistance with research permits and access to communities.
The Fellowship makes it possible for a budgeted project to be carried out over about 18 months: this period to include both field research and writing-up. Fellows are required to spend part of their fellowship period in the field and part in the Museum, and where they are expected to contribute to its academic life. In the Museum, the fellows will be affiliated to both the Department of Africa, Oceania and the Americas, and the Department of Ancient Egypt and Sudan.
The Fellowship will provide £30,000 to be spent over 18 months, inclusive of all costs except overheads to be borne by the Museum for time spent in London, but exclusive of salary. The Fellowships, are awarded to post-doctoral applicants by open competition without restriction of nationality or residence. Fellowship applicants are required to submit a budget including all personal and research expenses (within Sudan and the UK), insurance, and costs of equipment necessary for the project.
The Urgent Anthropology Fund is managed through the Royal Anthropological Institute.
Please submit applications to AOA@britishmuseum.org
Closing date is 10 January 2014. »