Archives par mot-clé : Conference

CONFERENCE – “Borders and Territorial Reconfigurations in the Middle East and the Sahel”, January 30-31st 2017, in Aswan (Egypt)

CEDEJ Khartoum is pleased to announce that several of its associate researchers and PhD students will participate in the international scientific conference “Borders and Territorial Reconfigurations in the Middle East and the Sahel”, organized by CEDEJ, to be held from January 30th to 31st, 2017, in Aswan, at the Arab Academy for Science, Technology and Maritime Transport.

affiche-frontiecc80res-vf-web5Our associate researchers and PhD students will participate in the Panel 2 « Borders, mobilities and state making« , on January 30th.

Dr Hassan Elhagali, Professor of Political science at the University of Khartoum and Associate Researcher at CEDEJ Khartoum, will chair this panel.

Géraldine Pinauldt (IFG, univ. Paris 8) and Nathalie Coste (CERI- Sciences Po Paris/CEDEJ Khartoum) will present together a joint paper entitled « Somaliland et Soudan du Sud : Des précurseurs à la marge des bouleversements frontaliers au Moyen-Orient et au Sahel. Création d’Etat et identité(s) nationale(s), entre reconfiguration et statu quo ».

Netsereab Ghebremichael Andom (univ. of Khartoum/CEDEJ Khartoum) will present  » Migrant Influxes and their Implications to Border and Territorial Reconfigurations in SSA: The Case of Eritrea and Sudan ».

Bashir Shariff (univ. of Khartoum/CEDEJ Khartoum) will present « Thinking Islamic Borders in the Horn of Africa ».

The programme of the conference is available online : https://assouan2017.wordpress.com/

CEDEJ Khartoum is thankful to Institut Français for providing its support  to fund the travel and stay to Aswan of these researchers and PhD students.

Katarzyna Grabska’s conference in AUC on May 16th – « Gender, Home & Identity: Nuer Repatriation to Southern Sudan »


Center for Migration and Refugee Studies
Seminar Series
« Gender, Home & Identity: Nuer Repatriation to Southern Sudan »
 
How and where did returning Nuer refugees make their ‘homes’ in South Sudan? How were gender relations and identity redefined as a result of war, displacement and return to post-war communities? And how were those displaced able to recreate sense of home, community and nation?
During the civil wars in Southern Sudan (1983-2005) many of the displaced Sudanese, including many Nuer, were in refugee camps in Kenya and Ethiopia. In the aftermath of the Comprehensive Peace Agreement, they repatriated to Southern Sudan. Faced with finding long-lost relatives and local expectations of ‘proper behaviour’, they often felt displaced again.
In this presentation, Grabska will present the findings of her recent book in which she  followed the lives of a group of Nuer in the Greater Upper Nile region. The narratives of those displaced and those who stayed behind reveal the complexity of social change and show how this has impacted on state formation in what is now South Sudan and, in particular, the crucial yet relatively unconsidered transformation of gender and generational relations.
 
Speaker
Katarzyna Grabska
 Research fellow, Graduate Institute of International and 
Development Studies, Geneva
May 16, 2016
6th floor LoungeHill House AUCTahrir Campus
6:30-8:00pm

CALL FOR PAPERS – International conference “Borders and territorial reconfigurations in the Middle East and the Sahel”, Aswan – January 30th-31st, 2017

CALL FOR PAPERS

International conference: “Borders and territorial reconfigurations in the Middle East and the Sahel”

Aswan, January 30th-31st, 2017

ca2278d9-d137-4a97-a06c-ab8bb2c691bf
Poster for the South Sudan referendum in 2011

« This Middle East forged in the clash of arms and disdain of its peoples is now crumbling before our eyes. This historic disruption is not the result of the contestation of borders, though they are unfair, but the consequence oftheir fate being reclaimed by the peoples concerned”.

Jean Pierre Filiu, « Les Arabes, leur destin et le nôtre » (The Arabs: theirDestiny and Ours), p.23, La Découverte, Paris, 2015.

Continuer la lecture de CALL FOR PAPERS – International conference “Borders and territorial reconfigurations in the Middle East and the Sahel”, Aswan – January 30th-31st, 2017

Conference – Several presentations on Sudan in « Writing Women’s Lives Conference » in School of Foreign Service in Qatar (Georgetown University), March 20th-22nd, 2016

Writing Women’s Lives Conference


Day 1 – March 20th, 2016

9:00 AM
Registration

9:30 AM
Panel 1: New Paradigms & Approaches

Andrea O’reily, York University, Canada
Aint I a Feminist? Matricentric Feminism, Feminist Mamas and Why Mothers Need a Feminist Movement/Theory of Their Own

Mervat Hatem, Howard University, USA
Contesting Canonical Representations of Women’s Lives: the Case of `A’isha Taymur (1840-1902)

Continuer la lecture de Conference – Several presentations on Sudan in « Writing Women’s Lives Conference » in School of Foreign Service in Qatar (Georgetown University), March 20th-22nd, 2016

CONFERENCE IN KHARTOUM – Migration and Exile in the Horn of Africa, State of knowledge and current debates

AfficheThe conference « Migration and Exile in the Horn of Africa. State of Knowledge and Current Debates » was held on November 17-18th in Khartoum.

During this two-day conference, about forty researchers have presented their empirical approaches on the issue of migration in the Horn of Africa. This event was jointly organized by CEDEJ Khartoum, CFEE Addis Ababa and the University of Khartoum.

The recent period is characterized by increasing internal migrations and by a growing number of displaced persons in the sub-region, especially in Somalia, Ethiopia and Sudan. At the same time, the number of shipwrecks in the Mediterranean Sea involving migrants coming from the Horn of Africa has tragically climbed. The issue of migration, which today largely captures the attention of media and politicians, has been widely studied by African and European researchers specialized on the Horn of Africa.

In addition to providing scientific approaches on the migratory processes, the conference « Migration and Exile in the Horn of Africa » gave us the possibility to shift and re-center the analysis on the Horn of Africa.

Programme – Migration and Exile in the Horn of Africa

IMG_9587IMG_9585David Ambrosetti, Director of CFEE in Addis AbabaIMG_9600Pr Ahmed Mohamed Suliman, Vice-Chancellor of the University of KhartoumIMG_9595 IMG_9596 IMG_9602 IMG_9604 IMG_9605Dr. Samia Abu Kashawa, Ministry of Higher Education and Scientific Research IMG_9610Bruno Aubert, Ambassador of France in SudanIMG_9616 IMG_9620Alice Franck, Coordinator of CEDEJ-KhartoumIMG_9647Ahmed M. Gamal Eldin, Associate Professor of Development and Migration in Ahfad UniversityIMG_9642 IMG_9664Thomas Osmond, CFEEIMG_9690Ali Khosroshahi, UNHCRIMG_9693 IMG_9706 IMG_9717Catherine Dom, WIDE EthiopiaIMG_9722Katarzyna Grabska, the Graduate Institute in GenevaIMG_9727Clara Lecadet, EHESS

IMG_9745Katherine Rehberg, UNHCRIMG_9754 IMG_9755 IMG_9765Azza Yacoub, SOAS LondonIMG_9767 IMG_9769 IMG_9774 IMG_9783Mohamed ABDEL SALAM Babiker, University of Khartoum IMG_9791Azza Yacoub and Omar Ismael Mahamoud (CERD Djibouti)IMG_9795Benoit Gaudin, University of Addis Ababa and IRDIMG_9685Maysa Ayoub, AUC
IMG_9634Netsereab ANDOM, University of KhartoumIMG_9798
IMG_9800Peter Miller (Paris 8) and Amina Said Chire (University of Djibouti)IMG_9806Marion Guillaume, Samuel HallIMG_9811Griet Steel, Utrecht University (The Netherlands) and Catholic University Leuven (Belgium)IMG_9814 IMG_9840Géraldine Pinauldt, CFEEIMG_9849 IMG_9857 IMG_9873IMG_9880

Our partners for this event:

IFMAEDIurmisPrintLogo WIDE Canwordmark_colourmekelle universityDjiboutiuni of pretoriaiomNGpGunQFZERLf-3Cqx2iIFhIhUmHTjMGQ0XPen6VkZAunhcrAUFSH Logoird

Call for papers: Annual conference of the Italian Society for Middle Eastern Studies (SeSaMO)

Annual conference of the Italian Society for Middle Eastern Studies (SeSaMO)Venice, Ca’ Foscari University, January 16-17, 2015

CALL FOR PAPERS

Panel n. 3, title:

The Arab World and Sahelian Africa: the political economy of an evolving relationship

Panel organisers:

Giorgio Musso (Ph.D), University of Genova, giomusso@gmail.com

Raphaelle Chevrillon-Guibert (Ph.D), University of Auvergne, raphaelleguibert@gmail.com

Paper proposal must be submitted directly to the panel organizers (without addressing them to SeSaMO secretariat) and must include a short CV of the applicant and an abstract of max 400 words.

Deadline for abstract submission: August 24, 2014

Acceptance/rejection of paper proposals: September 7, 2014

Working languages: English and French

Panel description

In this panel, we propose to analyse the multiple links existing between the Arab World and Sahelian Africa, with special attention to economic resource issues. Taking a political economy approach and focusing on the contemporary period, the panel aims to better understand which resources (in a broad sense) constitute the core of these relationships, in addition to how they are shared, controlled and managed. We also invite scholars who wish to examine actors who are at the heart of the resource accumulation processes and detail their development and evolution over time.

The term “resources”, for what concerns this panel, should be meant in the broadest meaning. It relates to the control, management and sale of natural resources (water, oil, mineral rents, etc.) as well as to a wider range of topics such as trade, remittances and  foreign investment just to name but a few. As an example, analyses focusing on trade activities that historically constitute the core of the relations between the Sahelian Africa and Arab world as the cattle trade or the trade of manufactured goods will be greatly appreciated.

It is also possible to examine the development of economic relations between the Arab world and Sahelian Africa by crossing questions related to different types of resources and to new economic competitors. Contributions that will analyse the impact of the rise of new global actors – particularly China and the other Asian emerging powers – on the reorganization of economic relations between the Sahelian countries and the Arab-Muslim world, but also inside local societies, could be very relevant.

 

The existence of trans-Saharan long-distance trade links, pilgrimage routes connecting Sub-Saharan Africa with the Arabian Peninsula, the expeditions of explorers, conquerors and missionaries, give testimony to the strong and long-standing relationship that has been forged between the Sahel and the Arab-Muslim world.

Far from being anecdotal, these links historically unfolded in various political spaces and were central to the state-formation processes in the region. The famous ¨Forty Day Road¨ linking Darfur with southern Egypt is a prime example in this regard. It played a key role in the formation and development of the Darfur Sultanate, whose prosperity was built on the control of the trans-Saharan caravan trade.

Today, these links remain at the heart of multiple sociocultural, economic and political dynamics, which significantly affect political formations in the region.

The recent political upheaval in the Arab world, commonly referred to as the “Arab Spring”, shows that several processes were at play below an apparently “frozen” political surface. Many of the issues driving change (labour migration, the spread of satellite media and the internet, civil and religious activism, the rise of new economic actors, etc.) had a clear regional and, sometimes, transnational character which needs to be investigated. In this perspective, the Sahel has been one of the most affected regions The events in North Africa and the Middle East . Most of the interest and attention of researchers and policy makers in this regard has been focused on the security aspect of transnational relations, only marginally addressing the other aspects.

Strategic and security issues are important and should be adequately addressed. However, it is our intention to avoid the obsession with security that has characterized the literature, albeit non-academic, in this domain, since other relevant dynamics that link the Arab world to the Sahel tend to be overshadowed by security issues.

By studying these relationships through a broader lens, our panel aims to provide an alternative perspective on the relations between Sahelian Africa and the Arab world, placing them in a wider historical and geopolitical context in order to convey their complexity.

The panel wishes to understand both the continuities and breaks in the relations between the Arab world and Sahelian Africa at different levels of observation and analysis (local, national, international, regional, transnational, etc.). Our panel therefore invites contributions assuming a dynamic perspective on the connections between the micro, meso and macro levels in which actors operate and interact with each other. Papers analysing how states and societies shape each other through the control and management of resources will be particularly welcome. We suggest contributors to frame their study in a historical perspective, although we expect papers to be centred on the contemporary period.

The changing nature of borders, the emergence and decline of transnational actors, the transformation of power relations will be central to our analysis, especially as we consider an area widely regarded as peripheral to both the Arab and “black” Africa.

We believe that is precisely the liminal nature of the Sahel that makes it central to multiple dynamics of connection, exchange and conflict. However, because of their geographic location at the periphery of the Arab-Muslim world, the Sahelian countries – which nevertheless share many characteristics of the core countries of the Arab world – are usually excluded from analyses on the transformations of the area. In light of how porous both the physical and conceptual borders of North African and Sahelian countries are, this panel will be also an opportunity for a reflection on the established research patterns covering the Arab-Muslim world. This may open new avenues of research, based on a broader understanding of the processes at work in the Arab-Muslim world.

 

This panel therefore aims to bring together studies dealing with economic resources which are at the heart of relations between Sahelian Africa and the Arab world. Applicants are invited to use a political economy approach focused on multiple scale levels. However, contributions tackling the research object from other disciplinary fields will be appreciated and evaluated. The use of sources resulting from fieldwork and empirical analysis will be a key criterion for the evaluation of proposals.

 

Selected authors will be invited to participate to a special issue that will be proposed to an academic journal covering the Arab-Muslim world, such as the International Journal of Middle East Studies or the Revue des mondes musulmans et de la Méditerranée, or to an African studies journals such as The Journal of Modern African Studies or Politique africaine.