Archives par mot-clé : droit international

CONFERENCE – « Une étude sur le Soudan : articuler recherches de terrain et approche formaliste du droit », par Philippe Gout

Le vendredi 17 mars 2017, Philippe Gout a présenté sa recherche doctorale à l’Institut des Hautes Etudes Internationales (IHEI):

« Une étude sur le Soudan :
articuler recherches de terrain
et approche formaliste du droit »

 

Philippe Gout est doctorant à l’Université Paris 2-Panthéon-Assas et chercheur invité au Max Plank Institute de Halle-Wittenberg. Il a aussi été boursier du CEDEJ Khartoum.

 

PUBLICATION – Soudan – La CPI et le crime de génocide : Manoeuvres politiques et statut des minorités au Darfour, par Philippe GOUT

Soudan – La CPI et le crime de génocide :
Manoeuvres politiques et statut des minorités au Darfour

par Philippe GOUT

Article publié sur le site de Noria, think tank et réseau d’experts en relations internationales

Cette enquête (en anglais) porte sur l’échec de la Cour Pénale Internationale (CPI) au Soudan. En se focalisant sur le Président soudanais Omar El-Béchir afin d’obtenir son arrestation, l’action de la CPI et les manœuvres politiques autour de la qualification de génocide, ont eu des effets dramatiques sur la catégorisation des minorités au Darfour.

De ce travail se dégagent trois conclusions majeures :

Continuer la lecture de PUBLICATION – Soudan – La CPI et le crime de génocide : Manoeuvres politiques et statut des minorités au Darfour, par Philippe GOUT

Ongoing Research – Philippe Gout

Philippe Gout is a Ph.D student in international law at the Institute of Higher International Studies (Paris 2 Panthéon-Assas University). His research relates to The Protection of Minorities in Peacebuilding Process and mainly addresses ethnic groups. Relying on a regional approach, Philippe essentially focuses on the African context and on the legal innovations of the African Commission on Human and Peoples’ Rights.

His research brings closer two different issues: Peacebuilding – which is often equated to the new legal and controversial concept of jus post bellum – and the law of minorities. So as to associate these two issues into one comprehensive study, the research combines two objectivist approaches to international law: the sociological approach (G. Scelle) and the more recent democratic approach to international law (built upon J. Habermas’ thought).

Starting with Sudan as his main field research, Philippe intends to widen the scope of his study to Sudan’s surrounding States in order to challenge the classic legal dichotomy between international and internal armed conflicts. In so doing, the research aims at testing the consistency of the new legal concept of jus post bellum and at determining the nature and scope of the legal responsibility and accountability of peacebuilding stakeholders: from local tribal units to international organizations’ agencies.

The research otherwise aims at determining the extent to which international and regional legal systems rely on traditional laws of ethnic – and religious – groups in an attempt to uphold the peacebuilding process.  It notably tries to determine whether ethnic units can be granted collective status and rights additional to standard individual minority rights. It finally calls into question the international legal personality of ethnic minorities in the African regional legal context (either as legal or natural person).

 

After two experiences within the Special Tribunal for Lebanon (Office of the Prosecutor) and the Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia (Trial Chamber), Philippe was granted a scholarship by CEDEJ and is now carrying Ph.D research in Sudan. He is also a contributor to the Andromaque-Sudan Project (ANR – CJB) related to The Anthropology of Law in African and Asian Muslim Worlds: The Sudan.