Archives par mot-clé : Grabska

Book launch – “Gender, Home & Identity: Nuer repatriation to Southern Sudan”, By Dr Katarzyna Grabska, on Jan. 21st, 11am – at UofK

On January 21st, at the University of Khartoum, Dr Katarzyna Grabska  presented her book « Gender, Home & Identity: Nuer repatriation to Southern Sudan » (James Currey, 2014).

This book launch was organized with the support of CEDEJ Khartoum and the University of Khartoum.

DSC_0684

Gender, home and identityHow and where did returning Nuer refugees make their ‘homes’ in South Sudan? How were gender relations and identity redefined as a result of war, displacement and return to post-war communities? And how were those displaced able to recreate sense of home, community and nation?

During the civil wars in Southern Sudan (1983-2005) many of the displaced Sudanese, including many Nuer, were in refugee camps in Kenya and Ethiopia. In the aftermath of the Comprehensive Peace Agreement, they repatriated to Southern Sudan. Faced with finding long-lost relatives and local expectations of ‘proper behaviour’, they often felt displaced again.

This book follows the lives of a group of Nuer in the Greater Upper Nile region. The narratives of those displaced and those who stayed behind reveal the complexity of social change and show how this has impacted on state formation in what is now South Sudan and, in particular, the crucial yet relatively unconsidered transformation of gender and generational relations.

Katarzyna Grabska is a research fellow with the Department of Anthropology and Sociology of Development and a project leader with the Global Migration Centre at the Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies in Geneva. She is co-editor (with Lyla Mehta) of Forced Displacement: Why Rights Matter? (Palgrave 2008) and author of numerous articles and book chapters. She is an affiliate of French Research Centre in Khartoum (CEDEJ) and Ahfad University for Women in Omdurman.◼

 

MIGRATIONS – Dr Catherine WIHTOL DE WENDEN in Khartoum

On November 14th, CEDEJ Khartoum has organized a documentary screening, followed by a discussion with the renowned Researcher specialized on migrations issues, Dr Catherine WIHTOL DE WENDEN.

picture-115 Dr Catherine WIHTOL DE WENDEN holds a Ph.D. in political science from Sciences Po. She is a regular consultant for the OECD, the European Commission, UNHCR, and the Council of Europe. She is the Chair of the Research Committee on Migrations of the International Society of Sociology since 2002; she is a member of the Commission nationale de déontologie de la sécurité from 2003 to 2011; she is a member of the editorial boards of Hommes et migrations, Migrations  société, and Esprit. She is a lawyer and a political scientist. Her research focuses on the relationship between migrations and politics in France, migration flows, migration policies and citizenship in Europe and in the rest of the world.

For her visit in CEDEJ-K, we screened the documentary « Time to look at girls: migrants in Bangladesh and Ethiopia »(directed by Marco SPERONI, 31 minutes – 2015), produced and researched by Katarzyna GRABSKA, Nicoletta DEL FRANCO and Marina DE REGT.

« Time to look at girls: migrants in Bangladesh and Ethiopia »

Based on research funded by the Swiss Network of International Studies, Girl Effect Ethiopia, Terre des Hommes, University of Sussex, UK and the Feminist Review Trust

The increasing number of girls who move to cities is a momentous global change
Why are adolescent girls migrating and what happens to them?
How are their families and close ones affected?
What are the constraints and opportunities linked to migration for adolescent girls?
Bangladesh and Ethiopia are two examples of countries where girls’ independent migration is on the rise. This film explores the circumstances, decision-making, experiences and consequences of migration for adolescent girls in Bangladesh and Ethiopia. It is based on a research project “Time to look at girls: adolescent girls’ migration and development” (January 2014-December 2015), that explores the links between migration of adolescent girls and economic, social and political factors that trigger their movements. It shows the agency and choices being made by adolescent girls in their diverse migration experiences.

More migrants move within their own country or region than migrate to Northern countries. Bangladesh and Ethiopia have been experiencing increasing high rates of the migration of adolescent girls to work. In Bangladesh they are found for example in garment and other manufacturing industries; working as maids; or in beauty parlours. In Ethiopia, migrant girls are mainly escaping early marriages, seeking better living conditions, or aspiring to continue their education. Most of them take up paid work as maids or sex workers.

The film is based on four parallel stories about the trajectories of migration of adolescent girls in Bangladesh and in Ethiopia. In Bangladesh, the film portrays Lota and Sharmeen who are employed in garment factories. In Ethiopia, the documentary follows the lives of Tigist and Helen, two internal migrant girls, who end up in sex work. This beautifully shot film provides space for the powerful voices of the migrant girls who speak about their own circumstances, experiences, dreams for the future.

Breaking away from the dominant focus on girls as victims of trafficking, this film gives evidence of the resilience, creativity and agency of young migrants girls who faced with difficult choices.

The documentary screening was followed by a discussion, in the presence of Katarzyna GRABSKA*, with  Dr Catherine WIHTOL DE WENDEN.

We also had the great pleasure to have with us Dr. Hassan EL HAJ ALI, Dean of the Faculty of Economic and Social Sciences in the University of Khartoum.

 

*Dr Katarzyna GRABSKA is a Project Coordinator at the Global Migration Centre. She holds a BSc in International Relations from the London School of Economics and an MA in International Affairs and Conflict management from the Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies. Her research interests focus on inter-linkages between conflict, forced displacement, gender, generations and rights. She has received her PhD in Development Studies/Anthropology from the Institute of Development Studies (IDS) at the University of Sussex, UK. Her research focuses on social transformations in the context of forced displacement and return among southern Sudanese refugees. She is particularly interested in intersections of power, gender identities and gender and generational relations in forced displacement situations and the impact of (forced) migration on youth.

Publication – Gender, Home and Identity: Nuer repatration to South Sudan, by Katarzyna Grabska

How and where did returning Nuer refugees make their ‘homes’ in southern Sudan? How were gender relations and identity redefined as a result of war, displacement and return to post-war communities? And how were those displaced able to recreate a sense of home, community and nation?

During the civil wars in southern Sudan (1983-2005) many of the displaced Sudanese, including many Nuer, were in refugee camps in Kenya and Ethiopia. In the aftermath of the Comprehensive Peace Agreement, they repatriated to southern Sudan. Faced with finding long-lost relatives and local expectations of ‘proper behaviour’, they often felt displaced again.
Gender, home and identityThis book follows the lives of a group of Nuer in the Greater Upper Nile region. The narratives of those displaced and those who stayed behind reveal the complexity of social change, in particular, the crucial yet relatively unconsidered transformation of gender and generational relations, and how this has impacted on state formation in what is now South Sudan.
Katarzyna Grabska is a research fellow with the Department of Anthropology and Sociology of Development at the Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies (IHEID) in Geneva. She is also an associate researcher at the CEDEJ-Khartoum.