Archives par mot-clé : South Sudan

PUBLICATION – Revue Egypte/Monde Arabe (EMA) n°14//2016 – Le Soudan après l’indépendance du Soudan du Sud, sous la direction d’Alice Franck & Elena Vezzadini

CEDEJ Khartoum is pleased to announce the publication of the latest issue of Egypte/Monde Arabe (EMA) Journal on Sudan (n°14//2016):

« Sudan after the independence of South Sudan », directed by Alice Franck and Elena Vezzadini.

Most researchers and students who contributed to this issue are affiliated to CEDEJ Khartoum.

South Sudan officially gained independence on the 9th July 2011. This was the outcome of the peace agreement signed in January 2005 and in accordance with the national referendum of January 2011. This historic event, which should have put an end on the historical conflict between the Northern and Southern regions and communities, constituted a real challenge in term of adaptation, resilience and innovation for the whole of the society. In this unprecedented context of the birth of a new national territory, and the remodelling of existing spatial and political configurations, South Sudan has logically been at the centre of attention – whether this be from political actors, researchers or humanitarian donors. However, the North has been profoundly affected by this rupture as well. The intention of this issue is to shed light on some of these transformations.

 

 


 

Katarzyna Grabska wins Amaury Talbot Prize for African Anthropology

We are extremely pleased to announce that Katarzyna Grabska, associate researcher at CEDEJ Khartoum, recently won the 2014 Amaury Talbot Prize for African Anthropology for her book Gender, Home and Identity: Nuer Repatriation to Southern Sudan (Boydell & Brewer Ltd 2014).

Katarzyna Grabska’s conference in AUC on May 16th – « Gender, Home & Identity: Nuer Repatriation to Southern Sudan »


Center for Migration and Refugee Studies
Seminar Series
« Gender, Home & Identity: Nuer Repatriation to Southern Sudan »
 
How and where did returning Nuer refugees make their ‘homes’ in South Sudan? How were gender relations and identity redefined as a result of war, displacement and return to post-war communities? And how were those displaced able to recreate sense of home, community and nation?
During the civil wars in Southern Sudan (1983-2005) many of the displaced Sudanese, including many Nuer, were in refugee camps in Kenya and Ethiopia. In the aftermath of the Comprehensive Peace Agreement, they repatriated to Southern Sudan. Faced with finding long-lost relatives and local expectations of ‘proper behaviour’, they often felt displaced again.
In this presentation, Grabska will present the findings of her recent book in which she  followed the lives of a group of Nuer in the Greater Upper Nile region. The narratives of those displaced and those who stayed behind reveal the complexity of social change and show how this has impacted on state formation in what is now South Sudan and, in particular, the crucial yet relatively unconsidered transformation of gender and generational relations.
 
Speaker
Katarzyna Grabska
 Research fellow, Graduate Institute of International and 
Development Studies, Geneva
May 16, 2016
6th floor LoungeHill House AUCTahrir Campus
6:30-8:00pm

Book launch – “Gender, Home & Identity: Nuer repatriation to Southern Sudan”, By Dr Katarzyna Grabska, on Jan. 21st, 11am – at UofK

On January 21st, at the University of Khartoum, Dr Katarzyna Grabska  presented her book « Gender, Home & Identity: Nuer repatriation to Southern Sudan » (James Currey, 2014).

This book launch was organized with the support of CEDEJ Khartoum and the University of Khartoum.

DSC_0684

Gender, home and identityHow and where did returning Nuer refugees make their ‘homes’ in South Sudan? How were gender relations and identity redefined as a result of war, displacement and return to post-war communities? And how were those displaced able to recreate sense of home, community and nation?

During the civil wars in Southern Sudan (1983-2005) many of the displaced Sudanese, including many Nuer, were in refugee camps in Kenya and Ethiopia. In the aftermath of the Comprehensive Peace Agreement, they repatriated to Southern Sudan. Faced with finding long-lost relatives and local expectations of ‘proper behaviour’, they often felt displaced again.

This book follows the lives of a group of Nuer in the Greater Upper Nile region. The narratives of those displaced and those who stayed behind reveal the complexity of social change and show how this has impacted on state formation in what is now South Sudan and, in particular, the crucial yet relatively unconsidered transformation of gender and generational relations.

Katarzyna Grabska is a research fellow with the Department of Anthropology and Sociology of Development and a project leader with the Global Migration Centre at the Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies in Geneva. She is co-editor (with Lyla Mehta) of Forced Displacement: Why Rights Matter? (Palgrave 2008) and author of numerous articles and book chapters. She is an affiliate of French Research Centre in Khartoum (CEDEJ) and Ahfad University for Women in Omdurman.◼

 

CALL FOR CONTRIBUTION – The Sudan, five years after the independence of South Sudan: which reconfigurations, transformations, and evolutions in the “North”?

Call for contribution

vignette_ema-160x75

The Sudan, five years after the independence of South Sudan: which reconfigurations, transformations, and evolutions in the “North”?

South Sudan officially gained independence on the 9th July 2011. This was the outcome of the peace agreement signed in January 2005 and in accordance with the national referendum of January 2011. This historic event, which should have put an end on the historical conflict between the Northern and Southern regions and communities, constituted a real challenge in term of adaptation, resilience and innovation for the whole of the society.
In this unprecedented context of the birth of a new national territory, and the remodelling of existing spatial and political configurations, South Sudan has logically been at the centre of attention – whether this be from political actors, researchers or humanitarian donors. However, the North has been profoundly affected by this rupture as well.

Continuer la lecture de CALL FOR CONTRIBUTION – The Sudan, five years after the independence of South Sudan: which reconfigurations, transformations, and evolutions in the “North”?

Publication – Gender, Home and Identity: Nuer repatration to South Sudan, by Katarzyna Grabska

How and where did returning Nuer refugees make their ‘homes’ in southern Sudan? How were gender relations and identity redefined as a result of war, displacement and return to post-war communities? And how were those displaced able to recreate a sense of home, community and nation?

During the civil wars in southern Sudan (1983-2005) many of the displaced Sudanese, including many Nuer, were in refugee camps in Kenya and Ethiopia. In the aftermath of the Comprehensive Peace Agreement, they repatriated to southern Sudan. Faced with finding long-lost relatives and local expectations of ‘proper behaviour’, they often felt displaced again.
Gender, home and identityThis book follows the lives of a group of Nuer in the Greater Upper Nile region. The narratives of those displaced and those who stayed behind reveal the complexity of social change, in particular, the crucial yet relatively unconsidered transformation of gender and generational relations, and how this has impacted on state formation in what is now South Sudan.
Katarzyna Grabska is a research fellow with the Department of Anthropology and Sociology of Development at the Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies (IHEID) in Geneva. She is also an associate researcher at the CEDEJ-Khartoum.

Mission and activities

  • Research Programs

The CEDEJ-Khartoum has been focusing its scientific activities around three main themes:

Islam and Society in Sudan and South Sudan 

The Islam Research Project (IRP) has mobilized a team of Sudanese and foreign researchers around the themes of new religious trends in Sudans and that of the status of religious minorities after the partition. This project was funded by the Dutch Ministry for European Affairs and International Cooperation.

Political and social restructuring underway in Sudan and South Sudan 

The CEDEJ-Khartoum has been closely following up political events and their consequences since the partition. Several research projects were launched to underline challenges and opportunities faced by Sudans. For instance, the centre organizes conferences in Addis Ababa to offer Sudanese, South Sudanese and foreign researchers a debating space.

Access to resources and their management

The centre worked on the access to resources and resources management in Sudans. A publication is in progress. Moreover, it took part in the Wamakhair program, led jointly by French, German and Sudanese institutions and dealing with water management in reater Khartoum.

  • Seminars and conferences

The CEDEJ-Khartoum wishes to favor research and exchanges among Sudans’ specialists. In that perspective, the center regularly organizes conferences and workshops to present and share its works, in Sudan as well as abroad. Moreover, the branch welcomes PhD seminars, which consists of a series of presentations given by PhD students regarding Contemporary Sudan and South Sudan in human and social sciences.

  •  Grants

The CEDEJ welcomes and supports students willing to carry researches on Sudan and South Sudan. It offers short-lived grants to young researchers in human and social sciences, Sudanese as well as foreigners. Moreover, in collaboration with the Cultural Cooperation Department of the French Embassy in Sudan, it supports a few Sudanese PhD students who were granted a scholarship to go study in France. Finally, the branch provides European PhD students with an International Mobility Grant (Aide à la Mobilité Internationale – AMI), aiming at supporting research on contemporary Sudan and South Sudan in anthropology, sociology, geography, political science, economy, history or law. ◼

 

The IRP (Islam Research Programme)

closing conference IRP program - March 4, 2013, University of Khartoum

 

The Islam Research Programme in Sudan is part of an overall research program “Strengthening Knowledge of and Dialogue with the Islamic/Arab World” commissioned by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Netherlands. The general aim of the program is to strengthen knowledge of and dialogue with the Muslim world. The program ‎concentrates on research on contemporary developments in the Muslim world that are relevant to Dutch policy ‎development in the field of international cooperation. Subjects of research fall within the areas of Islamic law, ‎political and socio-economic developments, and culture and religion.

The project is implemented in Sudan by the CEDEJ-Khartoum, which led a multidisciplinary team of researchers composed of Sudanese, French and American scholars who study religion, and its multiple expressions, social, political and legal in the societies of Sudan and South Sudan.

Closing events took place on March 4th and 5th, 2013, at the University of Khartoum and the Embassy of the Netherlands in Khartoum. For more details, visit the CEDEJ website.

 

Islam and Society in Sudan and South Sudan

The CEDEJ-Khartoum led a two years project on Islam in Sudan, part of an overall research program, “Strengthening Knowledge of and Dialogue with the Islamic/Arab World” commissioned by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Netherlands.

The research program started in April 2011, at a critical moment of Sudan’s history, right after the referendum in South Sudan and the birth of the new State. The multifaceted relationship between religion and society in Sudan has been deeply affected both by twenty-three years of the Islamist regime, the secession of South Sudan in 2011 and the departure of almost one third of the population, the majority of whom were non-Muslims.

The new political context following the secession in Sudan has not only affected actors of Islam and  the Muslim majority but also religious minorities that included non-Muslims and Muslims who are not part of the Sunni majority.  The secession of South Sudan had affected in a significant manner the status of Muslims from Southern Sudanese Muslims in the new state of South Sudan as well as the non-Muslim minorities in Sudan.

The objective of this study is to analyze these recent developments in the religious spectrum during the past two decades in Sudan by focusing first on the emerging actors/trends and new religious practices, and second on the status of religious minorities and interreligious relations in Sudan and South Sudan. In the first part of the study, the authors seek to highlight the pluralism of expression of Islam and new forms of urban religiosity and link these with the social and political changes. The second part covers the issue of the status of religious minorities in Sudan and South Sudan. The category of minority in this research includes non-Muslims in Sudan, Muslims who are not part of the Sunni majority and Muslims in South Sudan. The authors highlight the state’s policies (legal, political and administrative) to manage their religious minorities, explaining the current fragile status of religious minorities.  The issue of how minorities perceive themselves and how they are perceived and protracted in the public opinion is an important aspect of their status in the state and society. This is dealt with in a closing chapter that focuses on the public discourse on minorities. The public discourse on minorities is an interesting area to identify the influence of new religious trends.

This study has been conducted by researchers from different disciplines in social sciences. This multidisciplinary approach contributes largely to relate the socio-political and legal dimensions of the problematic of Islam and society in Sudan. For more details, read the synthesis report available on our website. ◼

Researching Sudan

Les carnets du CEDEJ-Khartoum doivent permettre de suivre les activités du CEDEJ au Soudan ainsi que ‎l’actualité sur les Soudans en matière de recherche en sciences humaines et sociales.
L’identité et l’actualité du centre y seront présentées (histoire, équipe, programmes de recherche en cours, conférences, publications etc.). Mais il s’agit également de faire du blog Hypothèses un lieu de partage de l’actualité des Soudans vue par les chercheurs en sciences humaines et sociales spécialistes de la région. ◼