Archives par mot-clé : sudan

DOCTORAL SEMINAR – Democracy and political parties in the Arab World – Case study: Sudan and Lebanon, by Azza Mustafa

Monthly Seminar at CEDEJ Khartoum

Next Monday 23rd January 2017

16:30 – 18:00

 CEDEJ Khartoum is very pleased to welcome

 Azza Mustafa Mohammed Ahmed, University of Khartoum

Who will present her PhD research on

 Democracy and Political Parties in the Arab World. Case Study: Sudan and Lebanon

 

On this occasion, we will have the pleasure of receiving Pascal Boniface – the Director of the French Institute for International and Strategic Affairs (IRIS, Paris).

 Abstract

The present research examines democracy in the Arab World with an emphasis on comparing democracies in both of Sudan and Lebanon. It analyses the variance and similarity between the two cases; and identifies the political, social and cultural reasons and factors that led to the hindering of establishing democracy in Sudan in contrast to its relative success in Lebanon. The research examines the role of political parties and their discourses are compatible with their social and political objectives.

 

PUBLICATION – Revue Egypte/Monde Arabe (EMA) n°14//2016 – Le Soudan après l’indépendance du Soudan du Sud, sous la direction d’Alice Franck & Elena Vezzadini

CEDEJ Khartoum is pleased to announce the publication of the latest issue of Egypte/Monde Arabe (EMA) Journal on Sudan (n°14//2016):

« Sudan after the independence of South Sudan », directed by Alice Franck and Elena Vezzadini.

Most researchers and students who contributed to this issue are affiliated to CEDEJ Khartoum.

South Sudan officially gained independence on the 9th July 2011. This was the outcome of the peace agreement signed in January 2005 and in accordance with the national referendum of January 2011. This historic event, which should have put an end on the historical conflict between the Northern and Southern regions and communities, constituted a real challenge in term of adaptation, resilience and innovation for the whole of the society. In this unprecedented context of the birth of a new national territory, and the remodelling of existing spatial and political configurations, South Sudan has logically been at the centre of attention – whether this be from political actors, researchers or humanitarian donors. However, the North has been profoundly affected by this rupture as well. The intention of this issue is to shed light on some of these transformations.

 

 


 

Research Reports – Time to look at girls: Adolescent girls’ migration in the South

The project ‘Time to look at girls », coordinated by Katarzyna Grabska and Professor Alessandro Monsutti, now comes to an end. This project studied adolescent girls migrating internally and internationally from Bangladesh, Ethiopia and Sudan.

The final reports are now available: http://graduateinstitute.ch/home/research/centresandprogrammes/global-migration/ResearchProjects/CurrentProjects/adolescent-girls-development-and.html

Here you can download  the comparative research report (Bangladesh, Ethiopia and Sudan) by Dr Katarzyna Grabska, Dr Nicoletta Del Franco and Dr Marina de Regt: Research Report Sudan girls migration Comparative Research Report FIN

And Dr Katarzyna Grabska’s report on Sudan : Research Report Sudan girls migration

 

Conference – « Tradition in Sudanese modern architecture – EXPO 2015:The Pavillion of the Sudan »

« Tradition in Sudanese modern architecture – EXPO 2015:The Pavillion of the Sudan » by Prof. Davide Longhi and Prof. Sandro Grispan of the IUAV University of Venice.

Conference in Khartoum on Sunday 6th of March 2016,  at 7:00 pm.

Venue: Sudan Hall, First Floor of the Main Library of the University of Khartoum, Nile Avenue entrance. ◼

 

PUBLICATION – Exiled Between Two Authoritarianisms: the Sudanese Exiled in Cairo, from Hosni Mubarak to Abdel Fattah El-Sisi, By Maaï Youssef

This article has been published on Noria Research website (Network of Researchers in International Affairs) http://www.noria-research.com/

The travesty election of the Marshal Abdel Fattah el-Sisi to the presidency of the Republic in July 2013 (Final report)1 demonstrates the permanence and the solidity of the authoritarian basis of the Egyptian State apparatus. Despite the political changes that have taken place since 2011, the prolonged presence, including during Mohamed Morsi’s presidency, of the same political actors within the security apparatus, has led, if not to an authoritarian “restoration”, at least to its re-composition within a counter-revolution movement. In order to grasp the modalities of the transformations and reproduction of authoritarian practices at the national level, studying the migratory issue, and more precisely the forced migration of Sudanese exiled in Egypt 2, provides a particularly pertinent analytical entry. Indeed, the issue of migration is administered by the State Security (amn al-dawla), and not by a ministry or any other governmental organ. It thus represents a key to understand both the regional political context and the spaces of migration, as well as the Egyptian “authoritarian syndrome”3

Continuer la lecture de PUBLICATION – Exiled Between Two Authoritarianisms: the Sudanese Exiled in Cairo, from Hosni Mubarak to Abdel Fattah El-Sisi, By Maaï Youssef

Research on Sudan: The British Museum and the Anthropologists’ Fund for Urgent Anthropological Research offer a second Research Fellowship in Urgent Anthropology

The British Museum and the Anthropologists’ Fund for Urgent Anthropological Research offer a second Research Fellowship in Urgent Anthropology. The Fellowship provides (non-salaried) financial support for an eighteen month period of field research and writing, with a specific focus on Sudan.

The Research Fellowship in Urgent Anthropology is designed to facilitate ethnographic research on peoples whose culture and language are currently threatened. The programme’s primary aim is to contribute to anthropological knowledge through detailed ethnography, and also if possible help the peoples being described in their particular circumstances. The British Museum is hosting the fellowship programme for three years from 2014: this is the second fellowship.

The British Museum Urgent Anthropology Fellowship Programme has a specific focus, on threatened Nile Valley communities in northern Sudan. The 20th century riverine communities of northern Sudan and Nubia have been the subject of relatively little anthropological field research, and are facing radical transformations, brought about by a variety of infrastructural developments, including dam construction, large-scale agricultural development, the arrival of mobile technologies and changing foodways. These are village communities based on subsistence agriculture and date palm cash-cropping; Arabic is widely spoken, as is Nubian.

The British Museum currently runs three ongoing archaeological research projects, at Amara West near Abri; Kawa near modern Dongola ; Dangeil near the cities of Berber and Abidiya . The first fellowship is currently held by Dr. Karin Willemse, who is focusing on the Abri area, with the following research questions:

· How do Nubians living in the Abri area, and those in the diaspora (mainly Khartoum), construct a notion of “the” Nubian community in the sense of an imagined community in the way they talk, reminiscence about the Nubian past, present and future?

· How do ‘Nubians’ thereby refer to spatial, cultural (material, visual, virtual and moral), and historical aspects of ‘Nubian-ness’ based on one Nubian core-culture?

The second fellowship will be offered to an anthropologist proposing a fieldwork project in these areas of northern Sudan, thus availing of the necessary logistical support, assistance with research permits and access to communities. Preference will be given to projects with a different focus from that of Dr. Willemse.

The Fellowship makes it possible for a budgeted project to be carried out over about 18 months: this period to include both field research and writing-up. Fellows are required to spend part of their fellowship period in the field and part in the Museum, and where they are expected to contribute to its academic life. In the Museum, the fellows will be affiliated to both the Department of Africa, Oceania and the Americas, and the Department of Ancient Egypt and Sudan.

The Fellowship will provide £30,000 to be spent over 18 months, inclusive of all costs except overheads to be borne by the Museum for time spent in London, but exclusive of salary. The Fellowships, are awarded to post-doctoral applicants by open competition without restriction of nationality or residence. Applicants should send an application comprising project proposal (maximum 4 pages) including research plan and timeline, intended outputs and budget; a CV and two letters of reference. The budget should include all personal and research expenses (within Sudan and the UK), insurance, and costs of equipment necessary for the project.

The Urgent Anthropology Fund is managed through the Royal Anthropological Institute.

Please submit applications to AOA@britishmuseum.org

Closing date is 31 July 2015.

Olivier Mongin: Urban Seminars Series Second Edition

Olivier Mongin presented a paper entitled « The city of flows, the two sides of globalization » during a seminar held at the Sharjah Hall the 24 of February in Khartoum and organized by the CEDEJ in collaboration with the Faculty of Economic and Social Studies, the Faculty of Architecture, the Faculty of Geography of the University of Khartoum. The seminar, translated from french to arabic, by Dr Azza Ahmed A. Aziz (SOAS – University of London),  was followed by a rich exchange between Mr Mongin and the audience of students and professors in presence of presence of Dr Hassan El Hajj, dean of the Faculty of Economic and Social Studies, Dr Gamal M. Hamid, dean of the Faculty of Architecture, Dr Ahmed El Faig, Dean of the Faculty of Geography, Dr Alice Franck, coordinator of the CEDEJ-Khartoum, Dr Ibtissam Sati, Deputy dean Faculty of Economic and Social Studies.

Olivier Mongin aims to demonstrate that globalization is not only an acceleration and intensification of exchanges of people, goods and information but it is first an anthropological change toward a mainly urban way of life. Such a change demands first one measure the current global turmoil. The developing countries now represent 95% of the world’s urban growth. Nine hundred million people live in what we refer to the historic city, when more than one billion live in favelas, slums and other illegal cities. Two more billion are living in contemporary urbanizations, a collection of diffuse cities, infinite cities, dispersed towns, etc. The city has thus been diluted but also more widespread. Olivier Mongin stresses the need to be aware of the stakes of this transformation of the urban experience by highlighting three major trends worldwide: flows tend to prevail over the places, especially with the Internet and the development of fast transport; urban diversity is declining everywhere, the privatization of life and public space is increasing.

For a better understanding of the urban element within globalization, Olivier Mongin relies on personal trips, readings and diverse artistic experiences hence developing an original analysis of the modalities of this supremacy of flows over places. From this perspective, he outlines a number of reflections linked to a paramount consideration of context and environment, including  the ecological, but also addressing issues of democracy and urban governance.

Olivier Mongin is a famous French essayist and philosopher. He was the director of the journal “Esprit” for over 20 years. Alongside the direction of this journal Olivier Mongin equally conducts publishing activities in various collections focusing on societal issues, philosophy and town planning. He has published books on different topics especially about democracy, the concept of “laughter” and about the city during the time of globalization.

British Museum: Research Fellowship in urgent anthropology: Sudan

Here you will find the call for application of the British Museum

Research Fellowship in Urgent Anthropology: Sudan

The British Museum and the Anthropologists’ Fund for Urgent Anthropological Research offer a Research Fellowship in Urgent Anthropology.  The Fellowship provides (non-salaried) financial support for an eighteen month period of field research and writing, with a specific focus on Sudan.

The Research Fellowship in Urgent Anthropology is designed to facilitate ethnographic research on peoples whose culture and language are currently threatened. The programme’s primary aim is to contribute to anthropological knowledge through detailed ethnography, and also if possible help the peoples being described in their particular circumstances. The British Museum will host the fellowship programme for three years from 2013, during which two Fellowships will be awarded.  This advertisement refers to the first of the two British Museum Fellowships; the second fellowship will be advertised in late 2014.

The British Museum Urgent Anthropology Fellowship Programme has a specific focus, on threatened Nile Valley communities in northern Sudan.  The 20th century riverine communities of northern Sudan and Nubia have been the subject of relatively little anthropological field research, and are facing radical transformations, brought about by a variety of infrastructural developments, including dam construction, the arrival of mobile technologies and changing foodways. These are village communities based on subsistence agriculture and date palm cash-cropping; Arabic is widely spoken, as is Nubian.

The British Museum currently runs three ongoing archaeological research projects, at Amara West near Abri; Kawa near modern Dongola; Dangeil near the cities of Berber and Abidiya. The first fellowship will be offered to an anthropologist proposing a fieldwork project in these areas of northern Sudan, thus availing of the necessary logistical support, assistance with research permits and access to communities.

The Fellowship makes it possible for a budgeted project to be carried out over about 18 months: this period to include both field research and writing-up. Fellows are required to spend part of their fellowship period in the field and part in the Museum, and where they are expected to contribute to its academic life. In the Museum, the fellows will be affiliated to both the Department of Africa, Oceania and the Americas, and the Department of Ancient Egypt and Sudan.

The Fellowship will provide £30,000 to be spent over 18 months, inclusive of all costs except overheads to be borne by the Museum for time spent in London, but exclusive of salary. The Fellowships, are awarded to post-doctoral applicants by open competition without restriction of nationality or residence. Applicants should send an application comprising project proposal (maximum 4 pages) including research plan and timeline, intended outputs and budget; a CV and two letters of reference. The budget should include all personal and research expenses (within Sudan and the UK), insurance, and costs of equipment necessary for the project.

The Urgent Anthropology Fund is managed through the Royal Anthropological Institute.

Please submit applications to AOA@britishmuseum.org

Closing date is 10 January 2014.

Call for application Les Afriques dans le monde: PhD research position

(English version below and attached)
Les Afriques dans le Monde (Sciences Po Bordeaux) lance un appel à candidatures pour l’attribution d’un contrat doctoral d’une durée de trois ans (prise de fonction prévue pour fin 2014-début 2015; 1500euros/mois). Le/la doctorant.e sélectionné.e réalisera une thèse de doctorat en science politique au sein du laboratoire Les Afriques dans le Monde et sera inscrit.e à l’école doctorale Société, Politique, Santé Publique (EDSP2). Il/elle sera intégré.e au programme de recherche portant sur les « Reconfigurations politiques, économiques et sociales dans la Corne de l’Afrique » (financé par le Conseil Régional d’Aquitaine).
Date limite des candidatures: 3 novembre 2014.
Voir le document joint pour davantage de détails.
The research institute Les Afriques dans le Monde (Africas in the World, Institute of Political Science, University of Bordeaux) is offering a three year Ph.D. research position as of December 2014/January 2015 (18000 euros/year). The Ph.D. candidate will be integrated in an interdisciplinary team with a focus on politics in Africa, and will work with the research program, « Reshaping Political and Socioeconomic Landscapes in the Horn of Arica ». He or she will be attached to the doctoral School of Society, Politics, an Public Health, University of Bordeaux. The doctoral research subject will focus on the analysis, including the stakes, of contemporary political, economic and social reconfigurations in the Horn of Africa.
Closing date: 3 November 2014.
See attached document for further details.

Call for application : CEDEJ short term scholarships for fieldwork research in Sudan (English/French)

CEDEJ short term scholarships for fieldwork research in Sudan

The CEDEJ branch of Khartoum offers short term grants for students and young researchers working in social sciences. The center can also accommodate the beneficiary for a maximal duration of 15 days. The CEDEJ will facilitate the administrative procedure for the visa, research permit, travel permit but the CEDEJ can be hold responsible for any administrative difficulties or a denied visa. The center will also help the students for his fieldwork in Sudan.

Eligibility
- The student has to hold a master 1 degree at minimum in social sciences
- The student has to do his research about contemporary Sudan in one of these discipline: sociology, anthropology, geography, political science, economic science, history, law, development studies.

Application

Application (in English or French) must be constituted by the following pieces:
- A detailed curriculum vitae (including if applicable a list of works and publications)
- A presentation of the applicant’s research project (5 pages maximum) including the issues at stake in the research, a methodology, a bibliography, the applicant’s motivations, the fieldwork places, a provisional timetable of the fieldwork, an estimate budget including other grants if the student receive any other funds.

The beneficiary is committed to write a report at the end of his fieldwork, a resume of the results of his fieldwork and a computer version of his master thesis or thesis when this one is over.

The application must be send by email to the CEDEJ coordinator: cedejkhartoum@gmail.com. An acknowledge of receipt will be send back to you. The selection will on case by case basis all along the year within the limits of available funds.

A prior experience of research in Sudan, a knowledge in Arabic would be strong assets in the applicant selection process.

For further information you can contact us at cedejkhartoum@gmail.com

 

Allocations de courte durée pour un travail de recherche de terrain au Soudan

L’antenne du CEDEJ à Khartoum propose des allocations de courte durée pour étudiants et jeunes chercheurs travaillant en sciences sociales. Le montant de la bourse sera déterminé au cas par cas, sur étude du dossier de candidature et du budget prévisionnel présenté. L’antenne peut également héberger allocataires et chercheurs de passage, dans la limite des places disponibles, et pour une durée consécutive maximale de 15 jours. Le CEDEJ s’efforcera de faciliter les procédures administratives pour l’obtention du visa et les recherches sur place, mais ne peut en aucun cas être tenu responsable des difficultés administratives et refus de visa. L’allocation ne sera définitivement attribuée et versée qu’une fois l’allocataire au Soudan.

Les conditions requises :
- Posséder au moins un diplôme de niveau maîtrise ou master 1 à la date de la demande, obtenu dans une discipline des sciences sociales.
- Proposer un thème de recherche portant sur le Soudan contemporain et s’inscrivant dans les disciplines suivantes : anthropologie, sociologie, géographie, science politique, économie, économie politique, histoire, droit, étude du développement

Le dossier de candidature (en anglais ou en français) doit être composé comme suit :
- Un Curriculum Vitae (formation, diplômes passés et en cours, recherches précédentes et en cours, publications éventuelles) et un bref descriptif précisant son statut (étudiant de master, doctorant, post-doctorant, institution de rattachement, nom du directeur de recherche, discipline de recherche, titre du travail, année d’inscription)
- Un projet de recherche de 3 à 4 pages précisant le projet individuel : l’objet, la problématique, la méthode, les lieux d’étude et le calendrier provisoire du séjour de recherche, ainsi qu’un budget prévisionnel en euros faisant apparaitre les autres financements dont il bénéficie.

L’allocataire s’engage à fournir un rapport écrit à l’issue de son séjour et une élaboration écrite des résultats de son enquête (les détails de cette participation seront précisés lors de l’élaboration de la convention d’allocation), ainsi qu’à transmettre une version informatique (pdf) de son mémoire ou de sa thèse une fois celui-ci achevé.

Les dossiers sont à envoyer, par email, à la coordinatrice du CEDEJ : cedejkhartoum@gmail.com. Un accusé de réception sera envoyé pour chaque dossier. Si vous ne le recevez pas, il vous appartiendra de vérifier que votre dossier nous est bien parvenu et qu’il sera donc examiné. Les demandes seront traitées au cas par cas tout au long de l’année dans les limites des financements disponibles et les réponses adressées au fur et à mesure par courrier électronique.

Note : Une expérience précédente de recherche au Soudan ainsi que la connaissance de la langue arabe (dialecte soudanais) seront considérées comme des atouts majeurs pour la sélection du dossier.

Pour toute information supplémentaire concernant les activités du CEDEJ et ses programmes de recherche, consulter les détails sur le site ou adressez-vous à cedejkhartoum@gmail.com.

 

 

Call for papers: Annual conference of the Italian Society for Middle Eastern Studies (SeSaMO)

Annual conference of the Italian Society for Middle Eastern Studies (SeSaMO)Venice, Ca’ Foscari University, January 16-17, 2015

CALL FOR PAPERS

Panel n. 3, title:

The Arab World and Sahelian Africa: the political economy of an evolving relationship

Panel organisers:

Giorgio Musso (Ph.D), University of Genova, giomusso@gmail.com

Raphaelle Chevrillon-Guibert (Ph.D), University of Auvergne, raphaelleguibert@gmail.com

Paper proposal must be submitted directly to the panel organizers (without addressing them to SeSaMO secretariat) and must include a short CV of the applicant and an abstract of max 400 words.

Deadline for abstract submission: August 24, 2014

Acceptance/rejection of paper proposals: September 7, 2014

Working languages: English and French

Panel description

In this panel, we propose to analyse the multiple links existing between the Arab World and Sahelian Africa, with special attention to economic resource issues. Taking a political economy approach and focusing on the contemporary period, the panel aims to better understand which resources (in a broad sense) constitute the core of these relationships, in addition to how they are shared, controlled and managed. We also invite scholars who wish to examine actors who are at the heart of the resource accumulation processes and detail their development and evolution over time.

The term “resources”, for what concerns this panel, should be meant in the broadest meaning. It relates to the control, management and sale of natural resources (water, oil, mineral rents, etc.) as well as to a wider range of topics such as trade, remittances and  foreign investment just to name but a few. As an example, analyses focusing on trade activities that historically constitute the core of the relations between the Sahelian Africa and Arab world as the cattle trade or the trade of manufactured goods will be greatly appreciated.

It is also possible to examine the development of economic relations between the Arab world and Sahelian Africa by crossing questions related to different types of resources and to new economic competitors. Contributions that will analyse the impact of the rise of new global actors – particularly China and the other Asian emerging powers – on the reorganization of economic relations between the Sahelian countries and the Arab-Muslim world, but also inside local societies, could be very relevant.

 

The existence of trans-Saharan long-distance trade links, pilgrimage routes connecting Sub-Saharan Africa with the Arabian Peninsula, the expeditions of explorers, conquerors and missionaries, give testimony to the strong and long-standing relationship that has been forged between the Sahel and the Arab-Muslim world.

Far from being anecdotal, these links historically unfolded in various political spaces and were central to the state-formation processes in the region. The famous ¨Forty Day Road¨ linking Darfur with southern Egypt is a prime example in this regard. It played a key role in the formation and development of the Darfur Sultanate, whose prosperity was built on the control of the trans-Saharan caravan trade.

Today, these links remain at the heart of multiple sociocultural, economic and political dynamics, which significantly affect political formations in the region.

The recent political upheaval in the Arab world, commonly referred to as the “Arab Spring”, shows that several processes were at play below an apparently “frozen” political surface. Many of the issues driving change (labour migration, the spread of satellite media and the internet, civil and religious activism, the rise of new economic actors, etc.) had a clear regional and, sometimes, transnational character which needs to be investigated. In this perspective, the Sahel has been one of the most affected regions The events in North Africa and the Middle East . Most of the interest and attention of researchers and policy makers in this regard has been focused on the security aspect of transnational relations, only marginally addressing the other aspects.

Strategic and security issues are important and should be adequately addressed. However, it is our intention to avoid the obsession with security that has characterized the literature, albeit non-academic, in this domain, since other relevant dynamics that link the Arab world to the Sahel tend to be overshadowed by security issues.

By studying these relationships through a broader lens, our panel aims to provide an alternative perspective on the relations between Sahelian Africa and the Arab world, placing them in a wider historical and geopolitical context in order to convey their complexity.

The panel wishes to understand both the continuities and breaks in the relations between the Arab world and Sahelian Africa at different levels of observation and analysis (local, national, international, regional, transnational, etc.). Our panel therefore invites contributions assuming a dynamic perspective on the connections between the micro, meso and macro levels in which actors operate and interact with each other. Papers analysing how states and societies shape each other through the control and management of resources will be particularly welcome. We suggest contributors to frame their study in a historical perspective, although we expect papers to be centred on the contemporary period.

The changing nature of borders, the emergence and decline of transnational actors, the transformation of power relations will be central to our analysis, especially as we consider an area widely regarded as peripheral to both the Arab and “black” Africa.

We believe that is precisely the liminal nature of the Sahel that makes it central to multiple dynamics of connection, exchange and conflict. However, because of their geographic location at the periphery of the Arab-Muslim world, the Sahelian countries – which nevertheless share many characteristics of the core countries of the Arab world – are usually excluded from analyses on the transformations of the area. In light of how porous both the physical and conceptual borders of North African and Sahelian countries are, this panel will be also an opportunity for a reflection on the established research patterns covering the Arab-Muslim world. This may open new avenues of research, based on a broader understanding of the processes at work in the Arab-Muslim world.

 

This panel therefore aims to bring together studies dealing with economic resources which are at the heart of relations between Sahelian Africa and the Arab world. Applicants are invited to use a political economy approach focused on multiple scale levels. However, contributions tackling the research object from other disciplinary fields will be appreciated and evaluated. The use of sources resulting from fieldwork and empirical analysis will be a key criterion for the evaluation of proposals.

 

Selected authors will be invited to participate to a special issue that will be proposed to an academic journal covering the Arab-Muslim world, such as the International Journal of Middle East Studies or the Revue des mondes musulmans et de la Méditerranée, or to an African studies journals such as The Journal of Modern African Studies or Politique africaine.

Participation of former CEDEJ PhD students in Summer school at the IFPO Beyrouth

The two formers PhD students from CEDEJ, Laure Crombé (geography at University of Paris Ouest Nanterre La Défense and University of Fribourg)
and Philippe Gout (international law at the Institute of Higher International Studies (Paris 2 Panthéon-Assas University) are taking part of the Summer school “Les sciences sociales au Proche-Orient à l’épreuve de leurs sources » at Ifpo (http://www.ifporient.org/node/1529)
in Beirut, (7-11 July 2014). This week offers the opportunity to exchange and share their research on Sudan with other
PhD students working in social sciences from Morocco to Iraq about of the relation to the field and data collection.
This initiative brings back Sudanese research experiences among a wide field of social sciences in the Middle East and the Arab world.

Phd Seminars At CEDEJ

These last months different Phd seminars were held at the Cedej center for Phd students supported by the Cedej. Each seminar gathered sudanese, french, foreigners researchers and Phd students interested or specialized on the topic of the seminar.

  1. Mai Azzam has presented her research the 6th of March on the youth religious identities in the Sufi orders. For more information about Mai Azzam and her research: http://cedejsudan.hypotheses.org/236 . Mai Azzam has a Cedej scholarships for her Phd.
  2. Philippe Gout has introduced his research the 4th of May related to « the Protection of minorities in the Peace-building Process in Sudan ». Mr Gout is at the end of his fieldwork scholarship granted by the Cedej. For more information about Philippe Gout research see our website : http://cedejsudan.hypotheses.org/162 .
  3. Azza Mustafa Ahmed has introduced her research the 15th of May about the analysis of political parties discourse with the case of the Umma Party. Azza Mustafa Ahmed is a Phd student in political science at the University of Khartoum.
  4. Claire Gillette  a french student in geography at Paris 1 Pantheon Sorbonne, has introduced the 25th of June her research about sanitation in Khartoum. In the following of the WAMAKHAIR research program on the water sector, her work explores the various sanitation and sewage systems that coexist in the city and focuses on a study case in Deim and Amarat.

 

 

Ongoing Research – Mai Azzam

Development of Burhanyyia community: shaping youth religious identities 

This research is part of a PhD project in anthropology at the University of Khartoum; it falls under the umbrella of a cooperation program between Paris 8 University and University of Khartoum. Broadly, it is concerned with the general theme of Islamization, Sufi orders and youth in Sudan.

Some scholars expected that Islam is becoming detached gradually from the African continent following the same pattern of detached Christianity in Europe. In fact, Sudan as an African Muslim country is presenting a different case than what was expected by scholars in the past. It can be clearly seen that Islam is becoming more attached to the community, and in particular to the young generation one. Dating back in the history Islam was introduced to Sudan through Sufi orders, in a formula that best suited the community, it was a successful marriage between Sufi ideology and local cultures. Since then, Sudan is subjected to continuous pressures of Islamization, although, this happened in different periods, but the most effective one started with the current regime. It is hard to separate the Islamization process from political ideology, the process which is well studied by different scholars locally as well as internationally. Nevertheless, it is relevant to study the effect of forced Islamization on a Muslim community. The changes that happened in the Muslim community in Sudan can be seen through different indicators, thus, for the sake of this study, religiosity manifestations and modes of religiosity are to be used as entrances to understand new formulas of religious identities. Identities are shaped in a long process that includes religious background as an important element, especially within the youth community. It is worth mentioning that religious identities can be selected or forced, this depends on a complex of factors, which will be studied along through this research. The varieties of religious identities in Sudan are wide and handy, it can be Sufi, Salafi, centrist, etc. This research is concerned with the Sufi “followers”, the case of Sufi orders in Sudan is best suits examining the changes forced by Islamization, taking into account the new forms of Sufi orders that are targeting youth. One of these orders is Burhanyyia in Khartoum, Burhanyyia are interested in young generations. Their discourse, ideology and strategy are directed to attract youth to join the Sufi orders. The case of Burhanyyia is well aligned with the overall trend of what is known as neo-Sufism, but also it is aligned with the massive numbers of Sufi branches, Sufi orders, which are born constantly in Khartoum. The sheikh Mohamed Osman Abdo Al Burhany, had a clear vision regarding his tariqqa, the targeted community, the future plan, and the modernizing mechanisms. There are different layers in the above description; Burhanyyia as a tariqqa that is always coping with the social modernity forces, but also keeping the authenticity of an old Sufi tradition, as well as, reacting towards the Islamization trend, that is fluctuating between forcing a monocular Islamic ideology sometimes, and tolerant to others sometimes. On the other side of this coin, youth who are seeking a religious identity choose to follow Sufi tradition; they find a platform in Burhanyyia which already well prepared to grasp them. This study is trying to understand through studying development of the Burhanyyia community, youth modes of religiosity, sociological motives behind joining a Sufi Order and the process of shaping a religious identity. This will be analyzed under the wide umbrella of the question regarding Islamization effects from an anthropological stand point.