Archives de catégorie : Scientific events

Latest Report Observatoire Afrique de l’Est

Dear all, For those who read French, Please find the latest report of the Observatoire de l’Afrique de l’Est (CEDEJ Khartoum-Sciences Po CERI), on this link: https://www.sciencespo.fr/ceri/sites/sciencespo.fr.ceri/files/OAE_oct18.pdf

Lutter et contester au Soudan (2009-2018)Note 6 Observatoire Afrique de l’Est, octobre 2018par Clément DESHAYES – Université Paris 8 Laboratoire LAVUE

Résumé: Le Soudan connaît depuis une dizaine d’année un cycle de protestations et de contestations sur fond de crise économique, d’essoufflement du régime militaro-islamiste d’Omar el-Béchir, de guerre civile au Darfour, dans le Nil Bleu et les Monts Noubas et de séparation du Soudan du Sud. Ces protestations protéiformes et parfois innovantes font évoluer le répertoire de l’action collective traditionnel et sont bien souvent une remise en cause de l’ordre politique. Cette note explore l’évolution des formes de mobilisations sociales au Soudan depuis une dizaine d’année ainsi que les rapports qu’entretiennent les mouvements sociaux avec la répression en s’intéressant aux acteurs mais surtout aux pratiques militantes déployées au sein de l’espace social de la contestation.
Reports of the Observatoire are available here: http://www.sciencespo.fr/ceri/fr/content/observatoire-de-l-afrique-de-l-est

Documentary Screening « Barbara Harrell-Bond: a life not ordinary », with Katarzyna Grabska

Dear all,

You are kindly invited to the screening of the Documentary film:

Barbara Harrell-Bond: a life not ordinary
Thursday 6 September
7pm – CEDEJ Khartoum
In the presence of Katarzyna Grabska 
(co-writter/producer)
Director: Enrico Falzetti

Written by Katarzyna Grabska and Enrico Falzetti

Produced by Katarzyna Grabska in collaboration with AMERA Int.

Documentary, 58 min.

https://vimeo.com/260901002

Through the prism of an extraordinary life, this documentary explores the achievements of Barbara Harrell-Bond – academic, refugee activist and a life-long advocate of refugee rights.

The film takes us on a personal journey of a not-so-ordinary woman born in a remote town in South Dakota during the Great Depression, and traces her career from her initial engagement with the civil rights in the late Fifties, to her move to the UK in the mid-Sixties where she studied social anthropology at the University of Oxford in the 1960s, and then to her travels in West Africa where she carried out much of her academic research.

Her first-hand experience of the Saharawi refugee camps in Algeria in 1980, and the humanitarian crisis in Sudan in 1982, led her to establish the first refugee studies centre in Oxford, of which she is a founding director, and numerous others around the world. A very strong advocate of legal aid programs for refugees in the Global South, Barbara established a number of these programs including in Uganda, Egypt, South Africa and the UK.

Far from being only an academic, the focus of Barbara’s life-long work has been on refugee rights, and on keeping refugees at the centre of humanitarian interventions. Issues which resonate even more deeply now, in an age in which safe havens for refugees are increasingly being eroded and violations of human rights are on the rise.

Seminar by Paul Hayes – PhD Student – « Sudanese Wrestling in East Nile, Khartoum »

Dear all,

We are very pleased to announce Paul Hayes’ presentation of his research next Thursday in CEDEJ Khartoum:

Sudanese Wrestling in East Nile, Khartoum

Paul Hayes 

PhD Candidate in Anthropology, Australian National University

Visiting Scholar, CEDEJ Khartoum

Thursday 6 September 2018

5pm – CEDEJ Khartoum

Abstract

In this seminar, Paul Hayes, from the Australian National University, will give an update on his ethnographic fieldwork among professional Sudanese wrestlers in Khartoum’s East Nile district. Despite emerging as a popular tourist attraction, Khartoum’s ‘Nuba wrestling’ has received only brief scholarly attention so far. For his research, Paul sets out to understand what it means to be a contemporary Sudanese wrestler in East Nile, noting that the athletes are increasingly non-Nuba. He seeks to make sense of how the sport emerged in Khartoum as a ‘professional’ and ethnically-inclusive variant of the ‘tribal’ sport that continues to be practiced in the Nuba Mountains today, and explores the ongoing tensions and (dis)continuities between the two varieties of wrestling practice. In the seminar, Paul will discuss the project’s objectives and methods, before delving deeper into the rules of the game and the broader social universe(s) that constitute the life of a Sudanese wrestler.

 

Special Roundtable Monday 3 September – Contemporary History of Sudan & South Sudan – with Willow Berridge, Harry Cross, Cherry Leonardi, Alden Young

Dear all,

We are very pleased to invite you to a discussion on the contemporary history of Sudan and South Sudan with a special Roundtable

 
Sudan – South Sudan History Since 1956
Recent Trends
with
Willow BERRIDGE (PhD)Newcastle University
Harry CROSS (PhD candidate)Durham University
Cherry LEONARDI (PhD),Durham University
Alden YOUNG (PhD),Drexel University
Monday 3 September
5 pm – CEDEJ Khartoum
Willow BERRIDGE is a historian of the 20th Century Islamic World, with a particular interest in Sudanese history and the dynamics of Islamist ideology. Her early research focused on policing and prisons in 20th century Sudan. It compared colonial, nationalist and Islamist penal ideologies and policing strategies, exploring important continuities and disconnects between each of three.

Her first book, Civil Uprisings in Modern Sudan, was inspired by her experience of living in the country during the Arab Spring. She was curious as to why the debates about civil protest and authoritarianism in the Middle East and North Africa region overlooked Sudan’s proud record of having been the only country in the region before 2011 to have witnessed civil protests that facilitated a transition from military rule to parliamentary democracy. In particular, the book responded to post-2011 debates about the respective roles of Islamism and secular ideologies in the Arab Spring by highlighting the extent to which ‘Islamist’ or other religiously-orientated groups were willing to collobarate with secularists within the student unions and professional associations that led the protests.

She has recently published (Cambridge University Press) a book on the controversial Sudanese Islamist Hasan al-Turabi. The text explores a number of important themes related to broader analyses of Islamist ideology: charismatic leadership (and its limitations); Islamism as a fusion of Western and Islamic ideologies; Islamism as ‘post-colonial’; the important of local political contexts in shaping religious ideology; and Islamist concepts of the Islamic state, democracy and jihad.

Harry CROSS is a PhD candidate at Durham University. His research focuses on the role of banks in Sudan after independence and until the nationalisation of Sudan’s private banking sector in 1970.

Harry is especially interested in the relationship between financial power and political power in Sudan, and interactions between local economic pressures and wider transformations in global political economy.

Cherry LEONARDI is Associate Professor of African History at Durham University and works primarily on South Sudan and northern Uganda. Her research has focused on local-level state formation since the nineteenth century: she is the author of Dealing with Government in South Sudan: Histories of chiefship, community and state (2013). Her current research projects include work on boundaries and land governance, witchcraft and security and access to energy/fuel, and she is also co-director of the South Sudan Museum Collections network.

She is currently planning new research on the history of forests, hunting and conservation.

Alden YOUNG is a political and economic historian of Africa. He is particularly interested in the ways in which Africans participated in the creation of the current international order. Since 2014, he has been an assistant professor in African History and the Director of the Africana Studies Program at Drexel University. He received his Ph.D. in 2013 from Princeton University. He then served for two years as a Dean’s Mellon Postdoctoral Teaching Fellow in the Department of Africana Studies at the University of Pennsylvania.His first book published by Cambridge University Press (Africa Series) Transforming Sudan: Decolonisation, Economic Development and State Formation, 2018 offers a historically grounded account of policymaking in postcolonial Africa. It challenges social scientists’ common perception of the post-colonial African state as rapacious and predatory with institutions that serve little other purpose besides patronage and legitimation. In the place of this narrative, he argues that Sudanese policymakers and officials like their peers across the decolonizing world believed in the potential of the postcolonial state to solve social questions in the public interest.

Alex De Waal gave his book Transforming Sudan advanced praise: « Today, a technocratic, economistic vision of a modern Sudan is a half-remembered dream. Alden Young’s superb book – a combination of political economy and cultural history – brings into focus the important but neglected story of how the country was once a model of planned development, led by an elite of Sudanese and British economists. »

In 2017 he published an article in Humanityentitled: “African Bureaucrats and the Exhaustion of the Developmental State: Lessons from the Pages of the Sudanese Economist,” which uses Sudanese journals to demonstrate how developmentalism gave way in Sudan to austerity.

SEMINAR – GAAFAR ELSOURI « OMDURMAN 1956-1969 : A SOCIAL HISTORY OF THE ‘NATIONAL CAPITAL' »

We are very pleased to announce CEDEJ Khartoum next Seminar on « Omdurman (1956-1969) : a social history of the ‘national capital' » by Gaafar Elsouri, on Tuesday 14 August- 5pm

 

Through Omdurman’s Town Planning Board’s sources and oral testimonies of the town’s inhabitants, Gaafar Elsouri will share his Master thesis research on the social history of Omdurman and of the birth and creation of the imaginary of a ‘national capital’ in the early years of Sudan as an independent State.

Gaafar Elsouri is a graduate student in History and Civilization with a specialization on the history of the Global South, at Paris 7 Diderot University.

Call for Papers: Fourth ACSS Conference « Power, Borders and Ecologies in Arab Societies: Practices and Imaginaries »

The Arab Council for the Social Sciences (ACSS) is pleased to announce its fourth conference, titled “Power, Borders and Ecologies in Arab Societies: Practices and Imaginaries” to be held in Beirut, Lebanon on April 12-14, 2019.

The Fourth ACSS Conference will be organized around the following three major axes:

  1. Power, Actors and the Political
  2. Borders, Migrations and Displacement
  3. Ecologies, Societies and Violence

Application Instructions

The ACSS invites proposals for individual paper presentations and organized panels.

1) Individual Papers
To submit a paper proposal, please complete the online application form including an abstract of 1 page (or approximately 500 words).

2) Organized Panels
To submit a panel proposal (3-4 papers), please fill out the online application form including an abstract of 1 page (or approximately 500 words).

Application Deadline: September 10, 2018

Find more information here.

Seminar – Zachary Mondesire « South Sudan and the Politics of Region-craft »

We are very pleased to announce CEDEJ Khartoum next Seminar on « South Sudan and the Politics of Region-craft » by Zachary Mondesire, on Thursday 19 July- 11 am

 

The seminar will focus on the new nation of South Sudan and what it now means to be South Sudanese in Africa. First, Zachary Mondesire will draw from his MA thesis that outlines the ideologies of racial difference that circulate in Juba defining relationships between South Sudanese themselves as well as with others from the region, whether northward to Khartoum or southward to Nairobi. These ideas emerged from three months of ethnographic research in 2017 in a modest hotel in Juba that operated as a site of refuge during the still-ongoing civil war and hosted Africans of multiple nationalities (Eritreans, Somalis, Ugandans, and South Sudanese of multiple backgrounds). Thinking through the linkages that his interlocutors made between race and national identity led him to ask (1) how Arab positionality, Khartoum, and Sudan continue to be relevant in South Sudanese political community and (2) given the multi-polar racial thinking of his interlocutors that envisions a racial and political geography much broader than the nation-state, what other forms of political community exist beyond the nation-state and towards the idea of multi-state region and how can his research account for them? The second piece of this paper is the conceptualization of Zachary Mondesire’s dissertation research project that will attempt to answer these questions.

Zachary Mondesire is a Ph.D. student in the Anthropology Department at the University of California – Los Angeles. His research focuses on South Sudanese journalists, politicians, and intellectuals in Khartoum and Nairobi, exploring how they think through regional belonging, race, and political community between East and North Africa.

Call for papers « Inequality and social cohesion » – 13th International conference of the AFD, Paris

The Agence Française de Développement’s Research Department is organizing a high-level conference every two years. The aim of the conference is to bring together leading academics and policy-makers to discuss key issues in development economics. Over the last years, the AFD’s International Conference has brought up to debate crucial topics such as “Evaluation and its discontents” in 2012, “Energy for Development” in 2014 and “Commons and Development” in 2016.

The next edition of the conference will be held on December 6th and 7th 2018 in Paris and will be focused on inequality, social cohesion and development.

For AFD, fighting inequalities is a mean to improve the society in which we want to live in. In our view, research and actions to fight inequalities are in a constant development that needs a further understanding and must be taken into consideration by all the actors in the society. The AFD has been engaged for some years now to understand the stakes of inequality in order to better address this challenge. The conference’s objective is therefore to contribute to the growing knowledge on inequality, by bringing together practices and research carried out at a global scale.

The 6th of December will be dedicated to a scientific day for which we welcome papers investigating the issue of inequality and social cohesion in developing and emerging countries. Key topics include:

  • Fiscal redistribution
  • Sustainability
  • The link between social inclusion, social cohesion and economic inequality

A selection of the papers will be published in a special issue of the Journal of Income Distribution.

The 7th of December will the dedicated to plenary sessions for which some of the confirmed invited speakers include:

▪ Gaël Giraud (AFD)

▪ Janet Gornick (CUNY-LIS Stone Center)

▪ François Bourguignon (PSE)

▪ James Galbraith (University of Texas)

▪ Murray Leibbrand (University of Cape Town)

▪ Branko Milanovic (CUNY-LIS Stone Center)

▪ Frances Stewart (University of Oxford)

▪ Alice Evans (King’s College)

Submission guidelines and timetable:

For the academic day, we are launching a call for papers (detailed information in the attached document). The deadline for application is August 20th, 23:59, Central European Time (UTC+01:00). Papers must be sent to conference_inequality2018@afd.fr , with the subject “Application – Call for Papers”, imperatively.

Please note that we will only be accepting COMPLETED papers in English or French, with a short abstract of 150 words. The presentation of the selected papers will be exclusively in English.

Decisions will be communicated by October 5th, 2018.

Travel and accommodation will be covered for a very limited number of participants originating from South countries and affiliated to South institutions. These participants will be selected based on the quality of their papers (best scores from the scientific committee) and will be contacted by email by October 5th. For those concerned, please attach the three following documents: a small letter explaining why you fit in the criteria, a passport copy and a proof of affiliation to the South institution.

Appel à contribution « Monde arabe et diplomaties parallèles » – Colloque annuel du CCMO – Paris, Automne 2018

Ébranlé par les soulèvements populaires de 2011, le monde arabe a vécu une séquence appelée à le marquer, en tant que tel et dans son rapport au monde. Pourtant, après une (re)découverte des sociétés, de leurs dynamiques et des registres de mobilisations d’acteurs non- étatiques, nombre d’analyses sont rapidement retombées dans des logiques plus traditionnelles.

Tout d’abord, le monde arabe est présenté successivement comme un ensemble de territoires colonisés ; un enjeu de la Guerre froide ; ou encore le terrain d’expression d’intérêts exogènes – énergétiques, économiques, stratégiques voire religieux. Objet d’un « Grand jeu » aux effets multiples, le monde arabe peine à s’imposer comme acteur à part entière. À l’inverse, perçu comme producteur de conflits, de réfugiés, voire d’extrémisme, il doit être « stabilisé » afin de devenir plus prévisible.

En second lieu, la majorité des études concernent les relations interétatiques, sans entrer dans l’analyse de la fabrique décisionnelle à l’intérieur des administrations. L’attention est dès lors portée sur les intérêts nationaux, la construction de politiques étrangères rationnelles, et sur les interactions qui peuvent être observées dans des cadres bi- ou multilatéraux. Les appareils diplomatiques sont au centre de ces travaux.

Enfin, le monde arabe connaît un traitement par crises. Ces approches tendent à privilégier une vision statique des intérêts des acteurs en présence, éludant souvent les évolutions sur le long terme et les dynamiques.

Si toutes ces approches contiennent leur part de vérité, nous souhaitons les compléter. Aussi le colloque annuel du Cercle des Chercheurs sur le Moyen Orient a-t-il choisi de traiter des « diplomaties parallèles » mises en œuvre dans et avec le monde arabe. Fonction traditionnellement régalienne, la diplomatie est aujourd’hui exercée par de nouvelles catégories d’acteurs, via des canaux multiples et selon les formes variées. Si ces personnalités ou ces groupes ne sont pas forcément des professionnels du champ ni associés à un État, cela ne signifie pas qu’ils ne sachent développer une expertise à cet égard, ou qu’ils ne puissent être à l’origine d’initiatives stimulantes, voire de succès notoires.

Contributions

À titre indicatif, les contributions pourraient ainsi traiter des thèmes suivants :

  • Les biais induits par les approches traditionnelles dans l’analyse du monde arabe (prise en compte des seuls intérêts des régimes, impacts analytiques par exemple à travers des grilles de lecture globalisantes comme l’opposition sunnites-chiites…).
  • La prise en compte d’aires géographiques dont les interactions avec le monde arabe sont moins connues (par exemple les interactions entre pays dits non-alignés) ou plus récentes, en étudiant en particulier la manière dont des acteurs des pays émergents (Afrique, Asie…) construisent une diplomatie à l’égard des pays arabes. Les contributions sur les relations intra-régionales ou Sud-Sud permettront de sortir du cadre souvent dominant en relations internationales des rapports entre Orient et Occident.
  • Les catégories d’acteurs qui interfèrent avec les politiques des États : organisations internationales (ONU, Banque mondiale, HCR…), régionales (UE, Ligue arabe), les acteurs économiques (cf. affaire Lafarge en Syrie), les groupes de pression, les groupes d’amitié parlementaire, les municipalités, les initiatives populaires, mais aussi les dynamiques transnationales à travers les ONG, la société civile, les diasporas…
  • La « fabrique » d’un agenda politique par ces acteurs, et la manière dont celui-ci interagit avec d’autres, et en particulier avec les États (renforcement ou concurrence ?) : selon les cas, ils peuvent être en mesure d’influer, de conforter ou de renverser une situation.

L’ensemble de ces contributions, et la publication collective qui fera suite à ce colloque, permettront de consolider des thématiques de recherches pour l’heure embryonnaires.

Les propositions de contributions (3 000 signes maximum) doivent être assorties d’une courte bibliographie et d’un résumé de CV du ou des intervenants.

Elles peuvent être rédigées en français, anglais ou arabe.

Elles doivent être envoyées avant le 15 juillet 2018 à l’adresse : buroccmo@gmail.com

Plus d’information sur l’appel à communications via le lien ci-dessus.

Bassem Chit Fellowship for the Study of Activism – Lebanon

The Bassem Chit fellowship for the study of activism is a one-year post doctoral fellowship based in Beirut, Lebanon. The fellowship is a joint initiative of Lebanon Support, the Arab Council for the Social Sciences, the Orient-Institut Beirut, and Rosa-Luxemburg-Stiftung Beirut Office. The fellowship aims to give early career scholars (0-3 years out of the Phd) in  the social sciences the opportunity to conduct research on activism in the Arab world. The Bassem Chit fellowship accepts proposals in Arabic, English, or French.

Disciplinary and Thematic Focus:​

The Bassem Chit Fellowship program aims at targeting scholars in the social sciences, particularly in the fields of political science, economics, sociology, anthropology, education, demography, media and cultural studies, among others. We also encourage applications from the humanities, including applications covering literature, cultural studies, history, philosophy and arts.

During the fellowship, the scholar will be requested to:​
  • Assist in Lebanon Support’s mapping of collective actions and produce quarterly digests
  • Produce an in-depth research paper on their research topic to be published on Lebanon Support’s Civil Society Knowledge Centre
  • Organise a round table at the OIB around their research
  • Participate and present a paper at the ACSS Fourth Conference that will be held  on April 12-14 2019
  • Organise a round table event on issues pertaining to collective action at Lebanon Support.

The fellowship duration is 12 months, and the earliest starting date is September 2018.

Eligibility criteria:
  • Citizens or nationals of an Arab country: An Arab country is defined by its membership in the League of Arab States. The term “national” refers to full-time and long-term residents of an Arab State, including those who do not have citizenship, as in the case of stateless refugees. Arab scholars residing outside the region at the time of application would be eligible only if they hold an Arab citizenship and are not in a tenure-track position and/or do not have access to research resources from their institution and/or country of residence. Accepted fellows are required to spend their 12 months fellowship period in Beirut at Lebanon Support’s offices.
  • Junior scholars (0-3 years out of the Phd) who have a doctoral degree in a social science or humanities discipline (obtained from within or outside the Arab region). Applicants who did not obtain their PhDs at the time of application will be ineligible.
  • Have high quality academic credentials including proficiency in qualitative and/or quantitative research methods. Applicants are required to submit a proposal (10-15 pages) building on their doctoral dissertation. Proposals that are not based on or not relevant to the applicant’s PhD dissertation will be disqualified. Proposals should highlight the applicant’s academic credentials and outline a research problem. Applicants should also provide a publications plan in addition to a 3-year career plan.
  • Have versatility to take on organisational roles when required, and the ability to work independently as well as with teams as outlined.
Timeline:
  • June 20, 2018: Application forms are available online.

July 15, 2018: Deadline for submissions.

  • Last week of July 2018: Decisions are communicated to applicants.
  • August 2018: Accepted applicants sign their contracts.
  • September 2018: Fellowship starts.
  • April 2019: Present at the ACSS Fourth Biennial Conference in Beirut-Lebanon.

For more information, please visit the offer’s page (link above).

Seminar Paris 8

Book launch

Anthropology of Law in Muslim Sudan. Land, Courts and the Plurality of Practices (Brill 2018)

Mardi 19 juin 2018, à 17h
EHESS, 105 Boulevard Raspail, salle 13

La dernière séance du séminaire annuel « Anthropologie comparative des sociétés et cultures musulmanes » sera consacrée à la présentation de l’ouvrage Anthropology of Law in Muslim Sudan. Land, Courts and the Plurality of Practices (Brill 2018). Résultat d’enquêtes menées dans le cadre du projet ANR ANDROMAQUE – Anthropologie du Droit dans les Mondes Musulmans Africains et Asiatiques (2011-2014), le volume analyse le caractère hybride des systèmes juridiques et la pluralité des pratiques légales dans des contextes urbains et ruraux du Soudan contemporain, en interrogeant la relation complexe entre islam et société. La séance sera animée par les coéditeurs, Barbara Casciarri et Mohamed Babiker (Department of Law, University of Khartoum) avec la participation de Munzoul Assal et Mohamed Bakhit (Department of Social Anthropology, University of Khartoum).

Séminaire de l’équipe « Anthropologie comparative des sociétés et cultures musulmanes » (LAS)

Organisateurs : Yazid Ben Hounet (Chercheur CNRS – LAS), Anne-Marie Brisebarre (Directrice de recherche CNRS émérite, LAS), Barbara Casciarri (MCF HDR, Paris 8), Tarik Dahou (Chercheur HDR, IRD) et Marie-Luce Gélard (MCF HDR, Paris 5).

Dr Anne-Laure Mahé, lauréate du prix Bélanger-Andrew

(English below)

Anne-Laure Mahé a soutenu avec succès sa thèse de doctorat le 13 décembre dernier. Intitulée «Négocier la domination autoritaire au Soudan : Développement participatif et dynamiques de pouvoir dans la province du Nord Kordofan», la thèse a été réalisée sous la direction de Mamoudou Gazibo à l’Université de Montréal. Le jury lui a unanimement décerné la mention « exceptionnelle ».

La nouvelle docteure a reçu il y a quelques jours le prix Bélanger-Andrew  qui récompense une thèse de doctorat rédigée en français par un-e étudiant-e inscrit-e dans un département canadien de science politique et soutenue dans la dernière année, et s’accompagne d’une bourse de 1000$.

Nous félicitons chaleureusement Anne-Laure qui avait effectué deux séjours de recherche au Soudan avec le soutien du CEDEJ Khartoum en 2016 !

——————————————————————————————

Anne-Laure Mahé successfully defended her thesis in December 2017 on «Négocier la domination autoritaire au Soudan : Développement participatif et dynamiques de pouvoir dans la province du Nord Kordofan» at the University of Montréal. Her thesis was of exceptional quality according to the examiners.

She was awarded a few days ago the Belanger-Andrew prize which rewards a science political thesis written in French by a Phd student of a Canadian university. The award comes with a 1000$ scholarship.

We extend our warmest congratulations to Anne-Laure who was an associate researcher in CEDEJ Khartoum in 2016 !

 

Seminar: Faculty of Economic and Social Studies -Department of Anthropology and CEDEJ Khartoum

Dear all:

We are very pleasured to announce our next Seminar , in collaboration with CEDEJ Khartoum, which will be presented by Dr.Enrico Ille; a social and cultural Anthropologist, under the title :

« The fate of date palms in the northern Sudan’s landscapes of vulnerabilities »

The seminar will be on Wednesday 2/5/2018, 12:00 at Postgraduate Room in the Department of Sociology and Social Anthropology.

Kindly find below an Abstract of the presentation.

Looking forward to see you all there!

The fate of date palms in the northern Sudan’s landscapes of vulnerabilities
Dr. Enrico Ille, in collaboration with Mohamed Salah

(Vulnerability, as being accessible to harmful acts without having adequate defence, is neither spatially nor temporally monolithic. Humans and other living beings are, for instance, variably exposed to potential or actual harm, i.e. the loss of something that is relevant for well-being. In addition, experienced harm can influence the expectation of harm and vice-versa, which informs a very specific, intersubjective or even individual situation and perception of vulnerability.

In this presentation, the subsequent complex dynamics are described as landscape where different vulnerabilities coincide. This conceptual language is used to discuss socio-ecological developments in northern Sudan, specifically the residential areas around the Third Nile Cataract. The observational focus is on the changing fate of date palms since the beginning of the 20th century. Their socio-ecological status vis-à-vis the human resident population is taken as trace element to qualify what kind of loss occurs when date palms experience harm, i.e. what other vulnerabilities are intertwined with their own vulnerability. This enables to discuss recent threats that became politically charged, such as flodding, fires, pests and pollution, in a way that is both critical and differentiated. By treating neither date palm nor human populations in monolithic terms, retracing vulnerabilities may open alternative perspectives on politico-ecological processes and contribute to adequate responses.)