Archives de catégorie : Cedej Events

Latest Report Observatoire Afrique de l’Est

Dear all, For those who read French, Please find the latest report of the Observatoire de l’Afrique de l’Est (CEDEJ Khartoum-Sciences Po CERI), on this link: https://www.sciencespo.fr/ceri/sites/sciencespo.fr.ceri/files/OAE_oct18.pdf

Lutter et contester au Soudan (2009-2018)Note 6 Observatoire Afrique de l’Est, octobre 2018par Clément DESHAYES – Université Paris 8 Laboratoire LAVUE

Résumé: Le Soudan connaît depuis une dizaine d’année un cycle de protestations et de contestations sur fond de crise économique, d’essoufflement du régime militaro-islamiste d’Omar el-Béchir, de guerre civile au Darfour, dans le Nil Bleu et les Monts Noubas et de séparation du Soudan du Sud. Ces protestations protéiformes et parfois innovantes font évoluer le répertoire de l’action collective traditionnel et sont bien souvent une remise en cause de l’ordre politique. Cette note explore l’évolution des formes de mobilisations sociales au Soudan depuis une dizaine d’année ainsi que les rapports qu’entretiennent les mouvements sociaux avec la répression en s’intéressant aux acteurs mais surtout aux pratiques militantes déployées au sein de l’espace social de la contestation.
Reports of the Observatoire are available here: http://www.sciencespo.fr/ceri/fr/content/observatoire-de-l-afrique-de-l-est

Documentary Screening « Barbara Harrell-Bond: a life not ordinary », with Katarzyna Grabska

Dear all,

You are kindly invited to the screening of the Documentary film:

Barbara Harrell-Bond: a life not ordinary
Thursday 6 September
7pm – CEDEJ Khartoum
In the presence of Katarzyna Grabska 
(co-writter/producer)
Director: Enrico Falzetti

Written by Katarzyna Grabska and Enrico Falzetti

Produced by Katarzyna Grabska in collaboration with AMERA Int.

Documentary, 58 min.

https://vimeo.com/260901002

Through the prism of an extraordinary life, this documentary explores the achievements of Barbara Harrell-Bond – academic, refugee activist and a life-long advocate of refugee rights.

The film takes us on a personal journey of a not-so-ordinary woman born in a remote town in South Dakota during the Great Depression, and traces her career from her initial engagement with the civil rights in the late Fifties, to her move to the UK in the mid-Sixties where she studied social anthropology at the University of Oxford in the 1960s, and then to her travels in West Africa where she carried out much of her academic research.

Her first-hand experience of the Saharawi refugee camps in Algeria in 1980, and the humanitarian crisis in Sudan in 1982, led her to establish the first refugee studies centre in Oxford, of which she is a founding director, and numerous others around the world. A very strong advocate of legal aid programs for refugees in the Global South, Barbara established a number of these programs including in Uganda, Egypt, South Africa and the UK.

Far from being only an academic, the focus of Barbara’s life-long work has been on refugee rights, and on keeping refugees at the centre of humanitarian interventions. Issues which resonate even more deeply now, in an age in which safe havens for refugees are increasingly being eroded and violations of human rights are on the rise.

Seminar by Paul Hayes – PhD Student – « Sudanese Wrestling in East Nile, Khartoum »

Dear all,

We are very pleased to announce Paul Hayes’ presentation of his research next Thursday in CEDEJ Khartoum:

Sudanese Wrestling in East Nile, Khartoum

Paul Hayes 

PhD Candidate in Anthropology, Australian National University

Visiting Scholar, CEDEJ Khartoum

Thursday 6 September 2018

5pm – CEDEJ Khartoum

Abstract

In this seminar, Paul Hayes, from the Australian National University, will give an update on his ethnographic fieldwork among professional Sudanese wrestlers in Khartoum’s East Nile district. Despite emerging as a popular tourist attraction, Khartoum’s ‘Nuba wrestling’ has received only brief scholarly attention so far. For his research, Paul sets out to understand what it means to be a contemporary Sudanese wrestler in East Nile, noting that the athletes are increasingly non-Nuba. He seeks to make sense of how the sport emerged in Khartoum as a ‘professional’ and ethnically-inclusive variant of the ‘tribal’ sport that continues to be practiced in the Nuba Mountains today, and explores the ongoing tensions and (dis)continuities between the two varieties of wrestling practice. In the seminar, Paul will discuss the project’s objectives and methods, before delving deeper into the rules of the game and the broader social universe(s) that constitute the life of a Sudanese wrestler.

 

Special Roundtable Monday 3 September – Contemporary History of Sudan & South Sudan – with Willow Berridge, Harry Cross, Cherry Leonardi, Alden Young

Dear all,

We are very pleased to invite you to a discussion on the contemporary history of Sudan and South Sudan with a special Roundtable

 
Sudan – South Sudan History Since 1956
Recent Trends
with
Willow BERRIDGE (PhD)Newcastle University
Harry CROSS (PhD candidate)Durham University
Cherry LEONARDI (PhD),Durham University
Alden YOUNG (PhD),Drexel University
Monday 3 September
5 pm – CEDEJ Khartoum
Willow BERRIDGE is a historian of the 20th Century Islamic World, with a particular interest in Sudanese history and the dynamics of Islamist ideology. Her early research focused on policing and prisons in 20th century Sudan. It compared colonial, nationalist and Islamist penal ideologies and policing strategies, exploring important continuities and disconnects between each of three.

Her first book, Civil Uprisings in Modern Sudan, was inspired by her experience of living in the country during the Arab Spring. She was curious as to why the debates about civil protest and authoritarianism in the Middle East and North Africa region overlooked Sudan’s proud record of having been the only country in the region before 2011 to have witnessed civil protests that facilitated a transition from military rule to parliamentary democracy. In particular, the book responded to post-2011 debates about the respective roles of Islamism and secular ideologies in the Arab Spring by highlighting the extent to which ‘Islamist’ or other religiously-orientated groups were willing to collobarate with secularists within the student unions and professional associations that led the protests.

She has recently published (Cambridge University Press) a book on the controversial Sudanese Islamist Hasan al-Turabi. The text explores a number of important themes related to broader analyses of Islamist ideology: charismatic leadership (and its limitations); Islamism as a fusion of Western and Islamic ideologies; Islamism as ‘post-colonial’; the important of local political contexts in shaping religious ideology; and Islamist concepts of the Islamic state, democracy and jihad.

Harry CROSS is a PhD candidate at Durham University. His research focuses on the role of banks in Sudan after independence and until the nationalisation of Sudan’s private banking sector in 1970.

Harry is especially interested in the relationship between financial power and political power in Sudan, and interactions between local economic pressures and wider transformations in global political economy.

Cherry LEONARDI is Associate Professor of African History at Durham University and works primarily on South Sudan and northern Uganda. Her research has focused on local-level state formation since the nineteenth century: she is the author of Dealing with Government in South Sudan: Histories of chiefship, community and state (2013). Her current research projects include work on boundaries and land governance, witchcraft and security and access to energy/fuel, and she is also co-director of the South Sudan Museum Collections network.

She is currently planning new research on the history of forests, hunting and conservation.

Alden YOUNG is a political and economic historian of Africa. He is particularly interested in the ways in which Africans participated in the creation of the current international order. Since 2014, he has been an assistant professor in African History and the Director of the Africana Studies Program at Drexel University. He received his Ph.D. in 2013 from Princeton University. He then served for two years as a Dean’s Mellon Postdoctoral Teaching Fellow in the Department of Africana Studies at the University of Pennsylvania.His first book published by Cambridge University Press (Africa Series) Transforming Sudan: Decolonisation, Economic Development and State Formation, 2018 offers a historically grounded account of policymaking in postcolonial Africa. It challenges social scientists’ common perception of the post-colonial African state as rapacious and predatory with institutions that serve little other purpose besides patronage and legitimation. In the place of this narrative, he argues that Sudanese policymakers and officials like their peers across the decolonizing world believed in the potential of the postcolonial state to solve social questions in the public interest.

Alex De Waal gave his book Transforming Sudan advanced praise: « Today, a technocratic, economistic vision of a modern Sudan is a half-remembered dream. Alden Young’s superb book – a combination of political economy and cultural history – brings into focus the important but neglected story of how the country was once a model of planned development, led by an elite of Sudanese and British economists. »

In 2017 he published an article in Humanityentitled: “African Bureaucrats and the Exhaustion of the Developmental State: Lessons from the Pages of the Sudanese Economist,” which uses Sudanese journals to demonstrate how developmentalism gave way in Sudan to austerity.

SEMINAR – GAAFAR ELSOURI « OMDURMAN 1956-1969 : A SOCIAL HISTORY OF THE ‘NATIONAL CAPITAL' »

We are very pleased to announce CEDEJ Khartoum next Seminar on « Omdurman (1956-1969) : a social history of the ‘national capital' » by Gaafar Elsouri, on Tuesday 14 August- 5pm

 

Through Omdurman’s Town Planning Board’s sources and oral testimonies of the town’s inhabitants, Gaafar Elsouri will share his Master thesis research on the social history of Omdurman and of the birth and creation of the imaginary of a ‘national capital’ in the early years of Sudan as an independent State.

Gaafar Elsouri is a graduate student in History and Civilization with a specialization on the history of the Global South, at Paris 7 Diderot University.

Seminar – Zachary Mondesire « South Sudan and the Politics of Region-craft »

We are very pleased to announce CEDEJ Khartoum next Seminar on « South Sudan and the Politics of Region-craft » by Zachary Mondesire, on Thursday 19 July- 11 am

 

The seminar will focus on the new nation of South Sudan and what it now means to be South Sudanese in Africa. First, Zachary Mondesire will draw from his MA thesis that outlines the ideologies of racial difference that circulate in Juba defining relationships between South Sudanese themselves as well as with others from the region, whether northward to Khartoum or southward to Nairobi. These ideas emerged from three months of ethnographic research in 2017 in a modest hotel in Juba that operated as a site of refuge during the still-ongoing civil war and hosted Africans of multiple nationalities (Eritreans, Somalis, Ugandans, and South Sudanese of multiple backgrounds). Thinking through the linkages that his interlocutors made between race and national identity led him to ask (1) how Arab positionality, Khartoum, and Sudan continue to be relevant in South Sudanese political community and (2) given the multi-polar racial thinking of his interlocutors that envisions a racial and political geography much broader than the nation-state, what other forms of political community exist beyond the nation-state and towards the idea of multi-state region and how can his research account for them? The second piece of this paper is the conceptualization of Zachary Mondesire’s dissertation research project that will attempt to answer these questions.

Zachary Mondesire is a Ph.D. student in the Anthropology Department at the University of California – Los Angeles. His research focuses on South Sudanese journalists, politicians, and intellectuals in Khartoum and Nairobi, exploring how they think through regional belonging, race, and political community between East and North Africa.

European migration policies: the case of the EUTF in Sudan

Dear All,

We are very pleased to announce CEDEJ Khartoum next Seminar :

Vladimir Cayol

“European migration policies: the case of the EUTF in Sudan”

Wednesday 25 April, 3pm

CEDEJ Khartoum

Summary: In 2015, during the La Valetta Summit, which gathered leaders of the 28 States of the European Union and about fifty African leaders, the President of the European Commission Jean-Claude Junker announced the launch of the Emergency Trust Fund for Africa. The European Trust Fund, financed by 3.4 Billion euros, aims at “addressing root causes of irregular migration and forced displacement”, protecting migrants along the migratory roads, and fighting against criminal networks which organize illegal migration. More than two years later, what does the Sudanese case reveals in terms of EU migration policies implementation? Sudan stands in a very special place in the Horn of Africa when it comes to migration trends. Situated between Eastern Africa and the Arab world, Sudan is crossed by many migrants whose desire is to reach the European shores. In a broader perspective, as a country of transit, departure, and even destination for migrants from the Horn of Africa or beyond, Sudan has become an key partner for the European countries. From a fieldwork conducted between September 2017 and April 2018 in Khartoum, I will examine the implementation of this financial tool in order to offer a better understanding of the policies implemented by the European Union in Sudan.

 

Vladimir Cayol is a master student in the field of Africa and the Middle East International and International Cooperation at the University Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne. He has been in intern in CEDEJ Khartoum where he has been working on migration issues these last months.

CEDEJ Khartoum is located in Khartoum 2 (street 59), not too far from Ozone. The closest « famous » building is an hospital : mustachfa « Jaber Abu el 3eez », mustachfa sukari (for diabetes). Our centre is at the second floor (there is a « CEDEJ » sign on the balcony).

Migration and appropriation of space: the case of Syrians in Khartoum

Dear all,

We are very pleased to announce CEDEJ Khartoum next Seminar, April 9, 3pm, at CEDEJ Khartoum:

Mathieu ROBAIN

« Migration and appropriation of space: the case of Syrians in Khartoum »

 CEDEJ Khartoum

Monday 9th of April

3:00 pm

Summary

Since the rise of the rebellion against Bashar el Assad in 2011, Syrian people have become one of  the most important refugees population in the world. These displaced people within Syria are fleeing to borders countries or Europe at a growing pace, hoping for a better life and at the same time hopeful for the end of the conflict. Sudans policy towards the Syrian refugees is very unique as it is one of the few countries to welcome them without restrictions. The friendly policies of the Sudanese government include not needing a visa, and being capable of opening shops and restaurants, which is extremely difficult for other refugees populations living within Khartoum. Because of this open policy the number of Syrians seeking refuge in Sudan is evermore increasing since 2013-2014 (the current estimate of the Syrian population is between 100 000 and 200 000 people according respectively to the government and the UNHCR). The fact they are not considered as refugees but as « brothers and sisters » involves many issues about the way they anchor to the space and organize social life, very different from others countries both arabic and western where they’re very often cooped up in camps or judged undesirable.

This research project hinges around the stories of Syrian people mostly located in Khartoum, the capital city, and especially in Riyad and Kafuri. It considers the migration not only as a movement from one country to another, but also as a way of dealing with the host society. It focuses on the spatial and social dynamism the Syrians add to these neighborhoods. As well as the representation they have within Sudan, the places where they live and work, and how they interact with each other and the host society. It leads to ask the question the denominations we give to the « Syrian people » in Khartoum  (are we talking about a community ? a diaspora ? a simple group ?).

 

Mathieu Robain is a Master 1 student in Geography at the Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne. He is affiliated to CEDEJ Khartoum and his research is included in the program « Arabité, Islamité, Soudanité » (« Being Arab, Muslim and Sudanese ») financed by the Francophone University Agency (and coordinated by prof. Barbara Casciarri)

When religion opens doors to migration The case of Islamic Universities Students in Khartoum

Dear All,
We are very pleased to announce CEDEJ Khartoum next Seminar, April 4, 3pm, at CEDEJ Khartoum:

 

Khadidja MEDANI

« When religion opens doors to migration

The case of Islamic Universities Students in Khartoum »

 CEDEJ Khartoum

Wednesday 4th of April

3:00 pm

Summary

The migration of Muslim African elites in the Arab-Muslim world to get formation in Islamic sciences or on the way to the Hajj is an old tradition. The religious education has also been an instrument for the Da’wa (Islamic call). Young Muslims from African countries educated in the Arab world go back home as Cheikhs and Imams. Sudan is a key place in this migration process not only because of his geographical situation but also his double status as an Arab and African country. 

In 1977 al-Merkaz al-Islami al-Ifriki (Islamic African center) was created in Khartoum. The Merkaz was a secondary school that offered only Islamic courses. In 1991 the Merkaz was upgraded as university and became the International University of Africa. This update was the first step in a new trend for the Islamic education in Khartoum. The term ‘islamic’ disappeared from the name and new faculties in modern sciences were created. Nowadays the university is still  in expansion. This shows the will to build a Muslim youth able to be integrated in the modern society while keeping an Islamic morality. This also correspond to the will of an African Muslim youth to be graduated in modern and technical sciences to contribute to the developpement of their country. Through a network of Muslim schools and organizations, Khartoum proposes these opportunity around the continent.

Khadidja Medani is a Master 2 student in Geography at the University Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne. HShe is affiliated to CEDEJ Khartoum and her research was conducted within the programm « Be Sudanese, muslim and Arab » financed by the Francophone University Agency (coord. by prof. Barbara Casciarri).

 
CEDEJ Khartoum is located in Khartoum 2 (street 59), not too far from Ozone. The closest « famous » building is an hospital : mustachfa « Jaber Abu el 3eez », mustachfa sukari (for diabetes). Our centre is at the second floor (there is a « CEDEJ » sign on the balcony).

15.587513, 32.535053

Images intégrées 1

Seminar : Cotton, Sugar, and Alfalfa: Changing Patterns of Agricultural Development in Sudan

We are very pleased to announce CEDEJ Khartoum next Seminar, on 26 February, at 3:00pm at CEDEJ Khartoum
Stefano Turrino

‘Cotton, Sugar and Alfalfa : Changing Patterns of Agricultural Development in Sudan »

CEDEJ Khartoum 
March 26
3:00 pm
Stefano TURRINI (1989) is a Phd candidate in Geography at the University of Padova, Italy. Before the Phd, he graduated in ‘Local Development’. His research is part of a longstanding interest of the Department of Geography in Padova about agriculture in arid and semi-arid areas, especially in the Sub-Saharan Africa.
Summary:
The importance of agriculture in Sudan is manifest. In this country, large-scale agricultural development dates back to the British colonial rule: the Gezira scheme started to produce cotton for the British textile industry in 1925, after the completion of the Sennar Dam on the Blue Nile. The Sudanese state, which became independent in 1956, built the Roseires Dam in 1966 with the aim of expanding the scheme: the Managil Extension made the Gezira cover nearly one million hectares of land. Nowadays, it is one of the largest agricultural schemes under a single administration in the world. In the 1970s, Sudan improved its domestic food production and expanded and diversified the exports. The goal was to become the ‘breadbasket of the Arab world’, benefiting from the funding of the Arab oil-producing countries. The importance of food crops became more prominent than before in Sudan. Especially sugar played a key role in that period: the state approved the construction of many agricultural schemes for the cultivation of sugarcane and sugar factories. Nowadays alfalfa is taking a leading role in the development of a new frontier of agricultural development in Sudan benefiting of a vibrant business environment in the Country.
What are the similarities and the differences among the production systems which are required by these crops (cotton, sugar and alfalfa). What is their impact on the local territory? Stefano will try to answer these questions by taking advantage of his fieldwork and the existing literature.

Ethnicity, Religion, Nationalism Crossed Insights from Anthropological Fieldworks at the Periphery of Arab-Muslim World Sudan-Morocco

Dear All,

CEDEJ Khartoum are very pleased to announce CEDEJ Khartoum next Seminar, Thursday 1st March, at 2:00pm at CEDEJ Khartoum.
Dr. Barbara CASCIARRI 
 
Ethnicity, Religion, Nationalism
 
Crossed Insights from Anthropological Fieldworks at the Periphery of Arab-Muslim World
Sudan-Morocco
 
 
(CEDEJ Khartoum Seminar Series on « Islams and Sudan »)
Barbara Casciarri holds a PhD in Ethnology and Social Anthropology from the Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales in Paris (France). She did fieldwork on economic and political anthropology in Sudan (1989-2016) among Arabic-speaking pastoralists and in a working-class neighbourhood of Khartoum (Deim), and in Morocco (2000-2006) on the relationship between Berber-speaking nomads and Arabic-speaking farmers. She was the coordinator of CEDEJ Khartoum between 2006 and 2009. Since 2004, she has been Associate Professor at the Department of Sociology, University Paris 8 (France) and researcher at the LAVUE-UMR 7218. She has been scientific coordinator of two ANR Projects in Sudan: WAMAKHAIR (2008-2012) and ANDROMAQUE (2011-2014). Since 2009, she has been responsible for the scientific agreement between the Faculty of Economic and Social Studies, University of Khartoum, and Paris 8 University.
CEDEJ Khartoum is located in Khartoum 2 (street 59), not too far from Ozone. The closest « famous » building is an hospital : mustachfa « Jaber Abu el 3eez », mustachfa sukari (for diabetes). Our centre is at the second floor (there is a « CEDEJ » sign on the balcony).

CEDEJ Khartoum is located in Khartoum 2 (street 59), not too far from Ozone. The closest « famous » building is an hospital : mustachfa « Jaber Abu el 3eez », mustachfa sukari (for diabetes). Our centre is at the second floor (there is a « CEDEJ » sign on the balcony).

15.587513, 32.535053

Exploratory readings of Mahdist archives : spatializing discursive practices in Sudan during the early Mahdiyya

Thursday 22nd February, at 3:00pm – CEDEJ Khartoum: 
Exploratory readings of Mahdist archives : spatializing discursive practices in Sudan during the early Mahdiyya
Anael Poussier is a doctoral candidate from the University Sorbonne – Paris 1, working under the under the supervision of Pierre Vermeren (University Sorbonne Paris 1 – IMAF) on the the history of the Mahdiyya (1880-1898). His PhD thesis attempts to analyse the socio-economic factors that defined the mobilization of the Sudanese population in favor of the Mahdist regime, with a particular emphasis on the Eastern Sudan. More broadly, his interests span the pre-colonial economic history of the Sub-Saharan belt and the various forms of social mobilization in this region during the XIXth century.

PhD Seminar – Practices of social control and construction of public authority : comparative perspectives from Lagos to Khartoum, by Lucie REVILLA

On Thursday 20th April 2017, at 1 pm, Lucie REVILLA, a French PhD student at Sciences Po Bordeaux University, will present her PhD research in CEDEJ Khartoum on:

« Practices of social control and construction of public authority : comparative perspectives from Lagos to Khartoum »

Continuer la lecture de PhD Seminar – Practices of social control and construction of public authority : comparative perspectives from Lagos to Khartoum, by Lucie REVILLA