Archives de catégorie : Cedej Events

European migration policies: the case of the EUTF in Sudan

Dear All,

We are very pleased to announce CEDEJ Khartoum next Seminar :

Vladimir Cayol

“European migration policies: the case of the EUTF in Sudan”

Wednesday 25 April, 3pm

CEDEJ Khartoum

Summary: In 2015, during the La Valetta Summit, which gathered leaders of the 28 States of the European Union and about fifty African leaders, the President of the European Commission Jean-Claude Junker announced the launch of the Emergency Trust Fund for Africa. The European Trust Fund, financed by 3.4 Billion euros, aims at “addressing root causes of irregular migration and forced displacement”, protecting migrants along the migratory roads, and fighting against criminal networks which organize illegal migration. More than two years later, what does the Sudanese case reveals in terms of EU migration policies implementation? Sudan stands in a very special place in the Horn of Africa when it comes to migration trends. Situated between Eastern Africa and the Arab world, Sudan is crossed by many migrants whose desire is to reach the European shores. In a broader perspective, as a country of transit, departure, and even destination for migrants from the Horn of Africa or beyond, Sudan has become an key partner for the European countries. From a fieldwork conducted between September 2017 and April 2018 in Khartoum, I will examine the implementation of this financial tool in order to offer a better understanding of the policies implemented by the European Union in Sudan.

 

Vladimir Cayol is a master student in the field of Africa and the Middle East International and International Cooperation at the University Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne. He has been in intern in CEDEJ Khartoum where he has been working on migration issues these last months.

CEDEJ Khartoum is located in Khartoum 2 (street 59), not too far from Ozone. The closest « famous » building is an hospital : mustachfa « Jaber Abu el 3eez », mustachfa sukari (for diabetes). Our centre is at the second floor (there is a « CEDEJ » sign on the balcony).

Migration and appropriation of space: the case of Syrians in Khartoum

Dear all,

We are very pleased to announce CEDEJ Khartoum next Seminar, April 9, 3pm, at CEDEJ Khartoum:

Mathieu ROBAIN

« Migration and appropriation of space: the case of Syrians in Khartoum »

 CEDEJ Khartoum

Monday 9th of April

3:00 pm

Summary

Since the rise of the rebellion against Bashar el Assad in 2011, Syrian people have become one of  the most important refugees population in the world. These displaced people within Syria are fleeing to borders countries or Europe at a growing pace, hoping for a better life and at the same time hopeful for the end of the conflict. Sudans policy towards the Syrian refugees is very unique as it is one of the few countries to welcome them without restrictions. The friendly policies of the Sudanese government include not needing a visa, and being capable of opening shops and restaurants, which is extremely difficult for other refugees populations living within Khartoum. Because of this open policy the number of Syrians seeking refuge in Sudan is evermore increasing since 2013-2014 (the current estimate of the Syrian population is between 100 000 and 200 000 people according respectively to the government and the UNHCR). The fact they are not considered as refugees but as « brothers and sisters » involves many issues about the way they anchor to the space and organize social life, very different from others countries both arabic and western where they’re very often cooped up in camps or judged undesirable.

This research project hinges around the stories of Syrian people mostly located in Khartoum, the capital city, and especially in Riyad and Kafuri. It considers the migration not only as a movement from one country to another, but also as a way of dealing with the host society. It focuses on the spatial and social dynamism the Syrians add to these neighborhoods. As well as the representation they have within Sudan, the places where they live and work, and how they interact with each other and the host society. It leads to ask the question the denominations we give to the « Syrian people » in Khartoum  (are we talking about a community ? a diaspora ? a simple group ?).

 

Mathieu Robain is a Master 1 student in Geography at the Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne. He is affiliated to CEDEJ Khartoum and his research is included in the program « Arabité, Islamité, Soudanité » (« Being Arab, Muslim and Sudanese ») financed by the Francophone University Agency (and coordinated by prof. Barbara Casciarri)

When religion opens doors to migration The case of Islamic Universities Students in Khartoum

Dear All,
We are very pleased to announce CEDEJ Khartoum next Seminar, April 4, 3pm, at CEDEJ Khartoum:

 

Khadidja MEDANI

« When religion opens doors to migration

The case of Islamic Universities Students in Khartoum »

 CEDEJ Khartoum

Wednesday 4th of April

3:00 pm

Summary

The migration of Muslim African elites in the Arab-Muslim world to get formation in Islamic sciences or on the way to the Hajj is an old tradition. The religious education has also been an instrument for the Da’wa (Islamic call). Young Muslims from African countries educated in the Arab world go back home as Cheikhs and Imams. Sudan is a key place in this migration process not only because of his geographical situation but also his double status as an Arab and African country. 

In 1977 al-Merkaz al-Islami al-Ifriki (Islamic African center) was created in Khartoum. The Merkaz was a secondary school that offered only Islamic courses. In 1991 the Merkaz was upgraded as university and became the International University of Africa. This update was the first step in a new trend for the Islamic education in Khartoum. The term ‘islamic’ disappeared from the name and new faculties in modern sciences were created. Nowadays the university is still  in expansion. This shows the will to build a Muslim youth able to be integrated in the modern society while keeping an Islamic morality. This also correspond to the will of an African Muslim youth to be graduated in modern and technical sciences to contribute to the developpement of their country. Through a network of Muslim schools and organizations, Khartoum proposes these opportunity around the continent.

Khadidja Medani is a Master 2 student in Geography at the University Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne. HShe is affiliated to CEDEJ Khartoum and her research was conducted within the programm « Be Sudanese, muslim and Arab » financed by the Francophone University Agency (coord. by prof. Barbara Casciarri).

 
CEDEJ Khartoum is located in Khartoum 2 (street 59), not too far from Ozone. The closest « famous » building is an hospital : mustachfa « Jaber Abu el 3eez », mustachfa sukari (for diabetes). Our centre is at the second floor (there is a « CEDEJ » sign on the balcony).

15.587513, 32.535053

Images intégrées 1

Seminar : Cotton, Sugar, and Alfalfa: Changing Patterns of Agricultural Development in Sudan

We are very pleased to announce CEDEJ Khartoum next Seminar, on 26 February, at 3:00pm at CEDEJ Khartoum
Stefano Turrino

‘Cotton, Sugar and Alfalfa : Changing Patterns of Agricultural Development in Sudan »

CEDEJ Khartoum 
March 26
3:00 pm
Stefano TURRINI (1989) is a Phd candidate in Geography at the University of Padova, Italy. Before the Phd, he graduated in ‘Local Development’. His research is part of a longstanding interest of the Department of Geography in Padova about agriculture in arid and semi-arid areas, especially in the Sub-Saharan Africa.
Summary:
The importance of agriculture in Sudan is manifest. In this country, large-scale agricultural development dates back to the British colonial rule: the Gezira scheme started to produce cotton for the British textile industry in 1925, after the completion of the Sennar Dam on the Blue Nile. The Sudanese state, which became independent in 1956, built the Roseires Dam in 1966 with the aim of expanding the scheme: the Managil Extension made the Gezira cover nearly one million hectares of land. Nowadays, it is one of the largest agricultural schemes under a single administration in the world. In the 1970s, Sudan improved its domestic food production and expanded and diversified the exports. The goal was to become the ‘breadbasket of the Arab world’, benefiting from the funding of the Arab oil-producing countries. The importance of food crops became more prominent than before in Sudan. Especially sugar played a key role in that period: the state approved the construction of many agricultural schemes for the cultivation of sugarcane and sugar factories. Nowadays alfalfa is taking a leading role in the development of a new frontier of agricultural development in Sudan benefiting of a vibrant business environment in the Country.
What are the similarities and the differences among the production systems which are required by these crops (cotton, sugar and alfalfa). What is their impact on the local territory? Stefano will try to answer these questions by taking advantage of his fieldwork and the existing literature.

Ethnicity, Religion, Nationalism Crossed Insights from Anthropological Fieldworks at the Periphery of Arab-Muslim World Sudan-Morocco

Dear All,

CEDEJ Khartoum are very pleased to announce CEDEJ Khartoum next Seminar, Thursday 1st March, at 2:00pm at CEDEJ Khartoum.
Dr. Barbara CASCIARRI 
 
Ethnicity, Religion, Nationalism
 
Crossed Insights from Anthropological Fieldworks at the Periphery of Arab-Muslim World
Sudan-Morocco
 
 
(CEDEJ Khartoum Seminar Series on « Islams and Sudan »)
Barbara Casciarri holds a PhD in Ethnology and Social Anthropology from the Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales in Paris (France). She did fieldwork on economic and political anthropology in Sudan (1989-2016) among Arabic-speaking pastoralists and in a working-class neighbourhood of Khartoum (Deim), and in Morocco (2000-2006) on the relationship between Berber-speaking nomads and Arabic-speaking farmers. She was the coordinator of CEDEJ Khartoum between 2006 and 2009. Since 2004, she has been Associate Professor at the Department of Sociology, University Paris 8 (France) and researcher at the LAVUE-UMR 7218. She has been scientific coordinator of two ANR Projects in Sudan: WAMAKHAIR (2008-2012) and ANDROMAQUE (2011-2014). Since 2009, she has been responsible for the scientific agreement between the Faculty of Economic and Social Studies, University of Khartoum, and Paris 8 University.
CEDEJ Khartoum is located in Khartoum 2 (street 59), not too far from Ozone. The closest « famous » building is an hospital : mustachfa « Jaber Abu el 3eez », mustachfa sukari (for diabetes). Our centre is at the second floor (there is a « CEDEJ » sign on the balcony).

CEDEJ Khartoum is located in Khartoum 2 (street 59), not too far from Ozone. The closest « famous » building is an hospital : mustachfa « Jaber Abu el 3eez », mustachfa sukari (for diabetes). Our centre is at the second floor (there is a « CEDEJ » sign on the balcony).

15.587513, 32.535053

Exploratory readings of Mahdist archives : spatializing discursive practices in Sudan during the early Mahdiyya

Thursday 22nd February, at 3:00pm – CEDEJ Khartoum: 
Exploratory readings of Mahdist archives : spatializing discursive practices in Sudan during the early Mahdiyya
Anael Poussier is a doctoral candidate from the University Sorbonne – Paris 1, working under the under the supervision of Pierre Vermeren (University Sorbonne Paris 1 – IMAF) on the the history of the Mahdiyya (1880-1898). His PhD thesis attempts to analyse the socio-economic factors that defined the mobilization of the Sudanese population in favor of the Mahdist regime, with a particular emphasis on the Eastern Sudan. More broadly, his interests span the pre-colonial economic history of the Sub-Saharan belt and the various forms of social mobilization in this region during the XIXth century.

PhD Seminar – Practices of social control and construction of public authority : comparative perspectives from Lagos to Khartoum, by Lucie REVILLA

On Thursday 20th April 2017, at 1 pm, Lucie REVILLA, a French PhD student at Sciences Po Bordeaux University, will present her PhD research in CEDEJ Khartoum on:

« Practices of social control and construction of public authority : comparative perspectives from Lagos to Khartoum »

Continuer la lecture de PhD Seminar – Practices of social control and construction of public authority : comparative perspectives from Lagos to Khartoum, by Lucie REVILLA

Phd Seminars At CEDEJ

These last months different Phd seminars were held at the Cedej center for Phd students supported by the Cedej. Each seminar gathered sudanese, french, foreigners researchers and Phd students interested or specialized on the topic of the seminar.

  1. Mai Azzam has presented her research the 6th of March on the youth religious identities in the Sufi orders. For more information about Mai Azzam and her research: http://cedejsudan.hypotheses.org/236 . Mai Azzam has a Cedej scholarships for her Phd.
  2. Philippe Gout has introduced his research the 4th of May related to « the Protection of minorities in the Peace-building Process in Sudan ». Mr Gout is at the end of his fieldwork scholarship granted by the Cedej. For more information about Philippe Gout research see our website : http://cedejsudan.hypotheses.org/162 .
  3. Azza Mustafa Ahmed has introduced her research the 15th of May about the analysis of political parties discourse with the case of the Umma Party. Azza Mustafa Ahmed is a Phd student in political science at the University of Khartoum.
  4. Claire Gillette  a french student in geography at Paris 1 Pantheon Sorbonne, has introduced the 25th of June her research about sanitation in Khartoum. In the following of the WAMAKHAIR research program on the water sector, her work explores the various sanitation and sewage systems that coexist in the city and focuses on a study case in Deim and Amarat.

 

 

Second Workshop of Andromaque Project – Sudan

The Sudanese team of the Andromaque project held a second Workshop in Khartoum in the reading room of the CEDEJ, on Sunday 2 March, from 9:00 am to 13:00 pm.

The Andromaque Sudan Team gathered  European and Sudanese researchers, whose main background is social anthropology, and has recently integrated 2 researchers with a law background. The members present at the workshop of the research team were: Barbara Casciarri (anthropologist, University Paris 8 Saint Denis, France, team’s scientific coordinator);  Munzoul Assal and Musa Adam Abdul-Jalil (Department of Anthropology, UoK);  Mohamed Abdessalam Babiker (Department of Law, UoK); Philippe Gout (PhD in Law, University Paris II Panthéon Assas, France) and Mai Azzam ( PhD student in anthropology, Khartoum, Sudan). Alice Franck, the coordinator of the CEDEJ in Khartoum was also present during the workshop.

For further information about the Andromaque project you can refer to the post about the first workshop of Andromaque.

First Workshop of Andromaque Project – Sudan at CEDEJ, Khartoum

The Sudanese team of the Andromaque project held a first Workshop in Khartoum in the reading room of the CEDEJ, on Sunday 24th November, from 10:00 am to 17:00 pm.

Andromaque is the acronyme for Anthropologie du Droit dans les Mondes Musulmans Africains et Asiatiques (Law Anthropologie in the African and Asian Muslim Worlds), a scientific research project supported by the French ANR (National Agency for Research) and led by Baudoin Dupret, director of the Centre Jacques Berque (Rabat, Morocco). It was launched in 2011 and will be achieved at the end of 2014. Its aim is to inquiry the relation between different sources of law (mainly customary and Islamic law) starting from the observation of actual legal practices and related social dynamics among Muslim groups in various regional contexts (Morocco and Sudan in Africa, India and Indonesia in Asia). It is coordinated with Prometee, a project whose aims and issues focus on the same approach and which analyzes similar situations of “legal pluralism” in Mauritania, Algeria and Lebanon.

Andromaque wokshop on 24/11/2013 in the CEDEJ center of Khartoum.(Musa Adam Abdul-Jalil 2013)
Andromaque workshop on 24/11/2013 in the CEDEJ center of Khartoum. (Musa Adam Abdul-Jalil 2013) 

The Andromaque Sudan Team gathered 6 European and Sudanese researchers, whose main background is social anthropology, and has recently integrated 2 researchers with a law background. The members of the research team are: Barbara Casciarri (anthropologist, University Paris 8 Saint Denis, France, team’s scientific coordinator); François Ireton (socio-economist, CNRS, France); Yazid Ben-Hounet (anthropologist, Laboratoire d’Anthropologie Sociale, France); Munzoul Assal and Musa Adam Abdul-Jalil (Department of Anthropology, UoK); Zahir M. Abdelkarim (anthropologist, PhD candidate at the Max Planck Institute, Germany); Mohamed Abdessalam Babiker (Department of Law, UoK) and Philippe Gout (PhD in Law, University Paris II Panthéon Assas, France).

The main topics tackled by the research team are: issues of land property and transmission in contemporary Sudan (pastoral collective “tribal” lands; agricultural land along the Nile Valley; residential land in the peripheral areas of Greater Khartoum); processes of conflicts’ legal resolution in various contexts (“informal courts” in IDPs areas around the capital town; mechanisms for settlement of disputes between farmers and pastoralists in the Eastern region; trials in “state courts” of Khartoum); overviews of the evolution of legal system(s) in Sudan concerning mainly land ownership, customary and statutory courts, and the relation between international law and shari’a law concerning the definition of minorities.

The aim of the workshop was to present the evolution of the various fieldwork cases, to establish a stronger relation between the social anthropology and the law approaches to legal practices and systems in contemporary Sudan and to link them to the wider common questions raised by the Andromaque project as a whole. The participants to the workshop also discussed the project of an edited book, that should be published soon after the end of the research program (2014) and would hopefully represent an interesting contribution for an interdisciplinary insight to this domain (legal practices and normative law systems) that is so crucial for understanding social dynamics in contemporary Sudan. Another meeting of the Andromaque Sudan Team would be held between February and March 2014, whose aim will be both the follow up of the editorial project and the organization of a final open workshop for the end of 2014.

Barbara Casciarri