Archives par mot-clé : protection of minorities

Phd Seminars At CEDEJ

These last months different Phd seminars were held at the Cedej center for Phd students supported by the Cedej. Each seminar gathered sudanese, french, foreigners researchers and Phd students interested or specialized on the topic of the seminar.

  1. Mai Azzam has presented her research the 6th of March on the youth religious identities in the Sufi orders. For more information about Mai Azzam and her research: http://cedejsudan.hypotheses.org/236 . Mai Azzam has a Cedej scholarships for her Phd.
  2. Philippe Gout has introduced his research the 4th of May related to “the Protection of minorities in the Peace-building Process in Sudan”. Mr Gout is at the end of his fieldwork scholarship granted by the Cedej. For more information about Philippe Gout research see our website : http://cedejsudan.hypotheses.org/162 .
  3. Azza Mustafa Ahmed has introduced her research the 15th of May about the analysis of political parties discourse with the case of the Umma Party. Azza Mustafa Ahmed is a Phd student in political science at the University of Khartoum.
  4. Claire Gillette  a french student in geography at Paris 1 Pantheon Sorbonne, has introduced the 25th of June her research about sanitation in Khartoum. In the following of the WAMAKHAIR research program on the water sector, her work explores the various sanitation and sewage systems that coexist in the city and focuses on a study case in Deim and Amarat.

 

 

Ongoing Research – Philippe Gout

Philippe Gout is a Ph.D student in international law at the Institute of Higher International Studies (Paris 2 Panthéon-Assas University). His research relates to The Protection of Minorities in Peacebuilding Process and mainly addresses ethnic groups. Relying on a regional approach, Philippe essentially focuses on the African context and on the legal innovations of the African Commission on Human and Peoples’ Rights.

His research brings closer two different issues: Peacebuilding – which is often equated to the new legal and controversial concept of jus post bellum – and the law of minorities. So as to associate these two issues into one comprehensive study, the research combines two objectivist approaches to international law: the sociological approach (G. Scelle) and the more recent democratic approach to international law (built upon J. Habermas’ thought).

Starting with Sudan as his main field research, Philippe intends to widen the scope of his study to Sudan’s surrounding States in order to challenge the classic legal dichotomy between international and internal armed conflicts. In so doing, the research aims at testing the consistency of the new legal concept of jus post bellum and at determining the nature and scope of the legal responsibility and accountability of peacebuilding stakeholders: from local tribal units to international organizations’ agencies.

The research otherwise aims at determining the extent to which international and regional legal systems rely on traditional laws of ethnic – and religious – groups in an attempt to uphold the peacebuilding process.  It notably tries to determine whether ethnic units can be granted collective status and rights additional to standard individual minority rights. It finally calls into question the international legal personality of ethnic minorities in the African regional legal context (either as legal or natural person).

 

After two experiences within the Special Tribunal for Lebanon (Office of the Prosecutor) and the Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia (Trial Chamber), Philippe was granted a scholarship by CEDEJ and is now carrying Ph.D research in Sudan. He is also a contributor to the Andromaque-Sudan Project (ANR – CJB) related to The Anthropology of Law in African and Asian Muslim Worlds: The Sudan.