Tous les articles par cedejsudan

SavNat Afrique – Cluster for sustainability research, Strasbourg

Bibliography

– Fassin, É., Fassin, D. (1988) « De la quête de légitimation à la question de la légitimité : les thérapeutiques “traditionnelles”auSénégal»,Cahiersd’ÉtudesAfricaines,vol.28,Cahier110, pp.207-231.
– Ingold, T., (2000), The Perception of the Environment. Essays in Livelihood, Dwelling and Skill, Londres, New York, Routledge.

– Hale, S., Kadoda, G. (2015), “Introduction. Identities evolving, mobilities expanding, and technologies intervening – Things come together” in S. Hale and G. Kadoda (eds.). Networks of knowledge production in Sudan: identities, mobilities, and technologies. Lanham; Boulder; New York; London: Lexington Books, pp. 1–22.

– Calkins, S. (2016), « How “clean gold” came to matter. Metal detectors, infrastructure, and valuation», Hau: Journal of Ethnographic Theory, n° 6, vol. 2, pp. 173–195.

Latest Report Observatoire Afrique de l’Est

Dear all, For those who read French, Please find the latest report of the Observatoire de l’Afrique de l’Est (CEDEJ Khartoum-Sciences Po CERI), on this link: https://www.sciencespo.fr/ceri/sites/sciencespo.fr.ceri/files/OAE_oct18.pdf

Lutter et contester au Soudan (2009-2018)Note 6 Observatoire Afrique de l’Est, octobre 2018par Clément DESHAYES – Université Paris 8 Laboratoire LAVUE

Résumé: Le Soudan connaît depuis une dizaine d’année un cycle de protestations et de contestations sur fond de crise économique, d’essoufflement du régime militaro-islamiste d’Omar el-Béchir, de guerre civile au Darfour, dans le Nil Bleu et les Monts Noubas et de séparation du Soudan du Sud. Ces protestations protéiformes et parfois innovantes font évoluer le répertoire de l’action collective traditionnel et sont bien souvent une remise en cause de l’ordre politique. Cette note explore l’évolution des formes de mobilisations sociales au Soudan depuis une dizaine d’année ainsi que les rapports qu’entretiennent les mouvements sociaux avec la répression en s’intéressant aux acteurs mais surtout aux pratiques militantes déployées au sein de l’espace social de la contestation.
Reports of the Observatoire are available here: http://www.sciencespo.fr/ceri/fr/content/observatoire-de-l-afrique-de-l-est

Doctoral position NCCR On the move

Doctoral student Open Position
Open Position
The nccr – on the move is looking for a

Doctoral Student

To complete a PhD thesis within the research project ‘Migration Governance through Trade Mobilitie’ at the World Trade Institute, University of Bern, under the supervision of Prof. Dr. Peter van den Bossche, PD Dr. Marion Panizzon (University of Bern) and Prof. Sandra Lavenex (University of Geneva).
 
The start date will be 1 February 2019

Full job description including the qualifications required and application details (PDF).
 

Documentary Screening « Barbara Harrell-Bond: a life not ordinary », with Katarzyna Grabska

Dear all,

You are kindly invited to the screening of the Documentary film:

Barbara Harrell-Bond: a life not ordinary
Thursday 6 September
7pm – CEDEJ Khartoum
In the presence of Katarzyna Grabska 
(co-writter/producer)
Director: Enrico Falzetti

Written by Katarzyna Grabska and Enrico Falzetti

Produced by Katarzyna Grabska in collaboration with AMERA Int.

Documentary, 58 min.

https://vimeo.com/260901002

Through the prism of an extraordinary life, this documentary explores the achievements of Barbara Harrell-Bond – academic, refugee activist and a life-long advocate of refugee rights.

The film takes us on a personal journey of a not-so-ordinary woman born in a remote town in South Dakota during the Great Depression, and traces her career from her initial engagement with the civil rights in the late Fifties, to her move to the UK in the mid-Sixties where she studied social anthropology at the University of Oxford in the 1960s, and then to her travels in West Africa where she carried out much of her academic research.

Her first-hand experience of the Saharawi refugee camps in Algeria in 1980, and the humanitarian crisis in Sudan in 1982, led her to establish the first refugee studies centre in Oxford, of which she is a founding director, and numerous others around the world. A very strong advocate of legal aid programs for refugees in the Global South, Barbara established a number of these programs including in Uganda, Egypt, South Africa and the UK.

Far from being only an academic, the focus of Barbara’s life-long work has been on refugee rights, and on keeping refugees at the centre of humanitarian interventions. Issues which resonate even more deeply now, in an age in which safe havens for refugees are increasingly being eroded and violations of human rights are on the rise.

Seminar by Paul Hayes – PhD Student – « Sudanese Wrestling in East Nile, Khartoum »

Dear all,

We are very pleased to announce Paul Hayes’ presentation of his research next Thursday in CEDEJ Khartoum:

Sudanese Wrestling in East Nile, Khartoum

Paul Hayes 

PhD Candidate in Anthropology, Australian National University

Visiting Scholar, CEDEJ Khartoum

Thursday 6 September 2018

5pm – CEDEJ Khartoum

Abstract

In this seminar, Paul Hayes, from the Australian National University, will give an update on his ethnographic fieldwork among professional Sudanese wrestlers in Khartoum’s East Nile district. Despite emerging as a popular tourist attraction, Khartoum’s ‘Nuba wrestling’ has received only brief scholarly attention so far. For his research, Paul sets out to understand what it means to be a contemporary Sudanese wrestler in East Nile, noting that the athletes are increasingly non-Nuba. He seeks to make sense of how the sport emerged in Khartoum as a ‘professional’ and ethnically-inclusive variant of the ‘tribal’ sport that continues to be practiced in the Nuba Mountains today, and explores the ongoing tensions and (dis)continuities between the two varieties of wrestling practice. In the seminar, Paul will discuss the project’s objectives and methods, before delving deeper into the rules of the game and the broader social universe(s) that constitute the life of a Sudanese wrestler.

 

Special Roundtable Monday 3 September – Contemporary History of Sudan & South Sudan – with Willow Berridge, Harry Cross, Cherry Leonardi, Alden Young

Dear all,

We are very pleased to invite you to a discussion on the contemporary history of Sudan and South Sudan with a special Roundtable

 
Sudan – South Sudan History Since 1956
Recent Trends
with
Willow BERRIDGE (PhD)Newcastle University
Harry CROSS (PhD candidate)Durham University
Cherry LEONARDI (PhD),Durham University
Alden YOUNG (PhD),Drexel University
Monday 3 September
5 pm – CEDEJ Khartoum
Willow BERRIDGE is a historian of the 20th Century Islamic World, with a particular interest in Sudanese history and the dynamics of Islamist ideology. Her early research focused on policing and prisons in 20th century Sudan. It compared colonial, nationalist and Islamist penal ideologies and policing strategies, exploring important continuities and disconnects between each of three.

Her first book, Civil Uprisings in Modern Sudan, was inspired by her experience of living in the country during the Arab Spring. She was curious as to why the debates about civil protest and authoritarianism in the Middle East and North Africa region overlooked Sudan’s proud record of having been the only country in the region before 2011 to have witnessed civil protests that facilitated a transition from military rule to parliamentary democracy. In particular, the book responded to post-2011 debates about the respective roles of Islamism and secular ideologies in the Arab Spring by highlighting the extent to which ‘Islamist’ or other religiously-orientated groups were willing to collobarate with secularists within the student unions and professional associations that led the protests.

She has recently published (Cambridge University Press) a book on the controversial Sudanese Islamist Hasan al-Turabi. The text explores a number of important themes related to broader analyses of Islamist ideology: charismatic leadership (and its limitations); Islamism as a fusion of Western and Islamic ideologies; Islamism as ‘post-colonial’; the important of local political contexts in shaping religious ideology; and Islamist concepts of the Islamic state, democracy and jihad.

Harry CROSS is a PhD candidate at Durham University. His research focuses on the role of banks in Sudan after independence and until the nationalisation of Sudan’s private banking sector in 1970.

Harry is especially interested in the relationship between financial power and political power in Sudan, and interactions between local economic pressures and wider transformations in global political economy.

Cherry LEONARDI is Associate Professor of African History at Durham University and works primarily on South Sudan and northern Uganda. Her research has focused on local-level state formation since the nineteenth century: she is the author of Dealing with Government in South Sudan: Histories of chiefship, community and state (2013). Her current research projects include work on boundaries and land governance, witchcraft and security and access to energy/fuel, and she is also co-director of the South Sudan Museum Collections network.

She is currently planning new research on the history of forests, hunting and conservation.

Alden YOUNG is a political and economic historian of Africa. He is particularly interested in the ways in which Africans participated in the creation of the current international order. Since 2014, he has been an assistant professor in African History and the Director of the Africana Studies Program at Drexel University. He received his Ph.D. in 2013 from Princeton University. He then served for two years as a Dean’s Mellon Postdoctoral Teaching Fellow in the Department of Africana Studies at the University of Pennsylvania.His first book published by Cambridge University Press (Africa Series) Transforming Sudan: Decolonisation, Economic Development and State Formation, 2018 offers a historically grounded account of policymaking in postcolonial Africa. It challenges social scientists’ common perception of the post-colonial African state as rapacious and predatory with institutions that serve little other purpose besides patronage and legitimation. In the place of this narrative, he argues that Sudanese policymakers and officials like their peers across the decolonizing world believed in the potential of the postcolonial state to solve social questions in the public interest.

Alex De Waal gave his book Transforming Sudan advanced praise: « Today, a technocratic, economistic vision of a modern Sudan is a half-remembered dream. Alden Young’s superb book – a combination of political economy and cultural history – brings into focus the important but neglected story of how the country was once a model of planned development, led by an elite of Sudanese and British economists. »

In 2017 he published an article in Humanityentitled: “African Bureaucrats and the Exhaustion of the Developmental State: Lessons from the Pages of the Sudanese Economist,” which uses Sudanese journals to demonstrate how developmentalism gave way in Sudan to austerity.

CALL FOR APPLICATION – SIR WILLIAM LUCE FELLOWSHIP 2019

The Sir William Luce Fellowship is awarded annually to a scholar at post-doctoral level, diplomat, politician, or business executive, working on those parts of the Middle East to which Sir William Luce devoted his working life (Iran, the Gulf states, South Arabia and Sudan), and is hosted by Durham University during the Easter term of each academic year.

The Fund is looking for research proposals that examine historic aspects of Iran, the Gulf States, South Arabia and Sudan that throw light on contemporary events. The Fund notes that the University holds a Sudan Archive containing records relating to both Sudan and South Sudan. The Committee administering the Sir William Luce Memorial Fund reserves the right not to make an appointment to a Fellowship.

The Fellowship, tenable jointly in the Institute for Middle Eastern & Islamic Studies and Trevelyan College, entitles the holder to full access to departmental and other University facilities such as Computing and Information Services and the University Library. The Fellowship also carries a grant, accommodation and all meals for the duration of the Fellowship. Fellows reside at Trevelyan College and are warmly encouraged to take a full part in the life of the Senior Common Room during their residence.

The Fellow is expected to deliver a lecture on the subject of his or her research which will be designated ‘The Sir William Luce Lecture’, and should be cast in such a way as to form the basis of a paper to be published in a special edition of the Durham Middle East Papers series.

Applicants for the 2019 Fellowship (29 April-28 June 2019) should send a CV (of no more than 2 pages), a two to three-page outline of their proposed research and contact details for two referees, preferably by e-mail, by Friday 7 September 2018 to:

The Honorary Secretary
Sir William Luce Memorial Fund
Durham University Library
Palace Green
Durham
DH1 3RN
United Kingdom

Email: luce.fund@durham.ac.uk

Find more information here.

SEMINAR – GAAFAR ELSOURI « OMDURMAN 1956-1969 : A SOCIAL HISTORY OF THE ‘NATIONAL CAPITAL' »

We are very pleased to announce CEDEJ Khartoum next Seminar on « Omdurman (1956-1969) : a social history of the ‘national capital' » by Gaafar Elsouri, on Tuesday 14 August- 5pm

 

Through Omdurman’s Town Planning Board’s sources and oral testimonies of the town’s inhabitants, Gaafar Elsouri will share his Master thesis research on the social history of Omdurman and of the birth and creation of the imaginary of a ‘national capital’ in the early years of Sudan as an independent State.

Gaafar Elsouri is a graduate student in History and Civilization with a specialization on the history of the Global South, at Paris 7 Diderot University.

The « Connect Talent » International Call for Applications

 

 

The purpose of the “Connect Talent” call for applications is to provide support for hosting world-class researchers at a laboratory in the Pays de la Loire region, on the west coast of France. “Connect Talent” seeks to attract technological or scientific breakthrough projects with unquestionable social and economic impact.

Beneficiaries

“Connect Talent” is intended for leading international scientists, alone or with a team. A leading scientist means a researcher with unquestioned international recognition: quality and dynamics in terms of scientific production, number of citations, distinctions (from the European Research Council, for example), international openness, scope of existing industrial relations, etc.

Topics

The call for applications is open to all scientific disciplines. Special attention will be paid to projects that will accelerate the development of an existing dynamic in the region, notably in the fields of production technologies, healthcare, the sea, plants, food, as well as cross-cutting topics in digital technologies, electronics and the human and social sciences.

Eligibility requirements

The award criteria are the following:
– the applicant must have a high academic level and international recognition;
– risk-taking and ambition of the scientific project;
– social and economic impact;
– acceleration of the scientific and technological dynamic in the Pays de la Loire region;
– feasibility (cost, schedule, support methods, governance, collaborations, etc.)

Applications

When you go to the Connect Talent website, you can:
1) read the text of the call for applications, which presents the objectives of “Connect Talent”, the selection process and the assessment criteria;
2) learn about research in the region and contact a host institution;
3) download and fill in the application file.

The deadline for filing applications is Monday, October 1 st, 2018. All applications must be posted on the website by the researcher’s host institution.

For further information, you can contact the Region’s services by email: aap.recherche@paysdelaloire.fr.

Call for Papers: Fourth ACSS Conference « Power, Borders and Ecologies in Arab Societies: Practices and Imaginaries »

The Arab Council for the Social Sciences (ACSS) is pleased to announce its fourth conference, titled “Power, Borders and Ecologies in Arab Societies: Practices and Imaginaries” to be held in Beirut, Lebanon on April 12-14, 2019.

The Fourth ACSS Conference will be organized around the following three major axes:

  1. Power, Actors and the Political
  2. Borders, Migrations and Displacement
  3. Ecologies, Societies and Violence

Application Instructions

The ACSS invites proposals for individual paper presentations and organized panels.

1) Individual Papers
To submit a paper proposal, please complete the online application form including an abstract of 1 page (or approximately 500 words).

2) Organized Panels
To submit a panel proposal (3-4 papers), please fill out the online application form including an abstract of 1 page (or approximately 500 words).

Application Deadline: September 10, 2018

Find more information here.

Postdoctoral position – IFRA IBADAN, Nigeria

L’IFRA-Nigeria recrute pour septembre 2019 un(e) nouveau/elle chercheur(e) contractuel(le) en sciences humaines et sociales.

Le/la chercheur(e), titulaire d’un doctorat en sciences humaines et sociales et fort(e) d’une expérience de recherche en Afrique sub-saharienne, travaillera à l’élaboration de programmes de recherche, notamment dans les domaines suivants : Dynamiques religieuses, Villes et environnement, Mobilisations et identités. Il/elle participera également à l’animation scientifique et pédagogique de l’Institut et à sa gestion administrative aux cotés de la directrice.

Il s’agit d’un contrat de deux ans renouvelable jusqu’à 4 ans en poste.  Ce poste est ouvert aux candidats de nationalité française ou ressortissant d’un autre pays de l’Union européenne, de l’espace économique européen, de la Suisse ou de Monaco.

La procédure de candidature est ouverte jusqu’au 15 octobre 2018 au soir.

Toutes les informations utiles sont disponibles dans la fiche de poste ci-jointe.

OBSERVATOIRE AFRIQUE DE L’EST – Dernières notes

Découvrez les dernières notes de l’Observatoire par ici : http://www.sciencespo.fr/ceri/fr/content/observatoire-de-l-afrique-de-l-est

  • Markus Hoehne, « Elections in Somaliland 2017 and their Aftermath », Avril 2018

Summary: In November 2017, a presidential election was held in Somaliland. This report focuses on the technical and political aspects of the most recent voters-registration and the election. For the first time in Somaliland’s history (and even world-wide), biometric technology in the form of iris scanners was used to diminish multiple voting. This report also looks at the immediate aftermaths of the election. The result of the election was contested, which led to tensions and some violent confrontations between the supporters of the main opposition party that had lost and the government forces. The report concludes by outlining report concludes by outlining the main political and economic challenges currently existing in Somaliland.

  • Roland Marchal, « Mutations géopolitiques et rivalités d’Etats: la Corne de l’Afrique prise dans la crise du Golfe », Mars 2018

Résumé: Le déclenchement de la crise du Golfe en juin 2017 a profondément affecté les pays de l’autre rive de la mer Rouge, en dépit souvent d’une neutralité affichée mais privée de tout contenu. Cette militarisation des politiques de voisinage ne produit pas pour autant un nouvel ordre régional plus cohérent ou apaisé. Au contraire. Mais, au-delà des péripéties de cette crise, on voit poindre de nouvelles politiques internationales portées par d’autres puissances émergentes comme la Turquie et surtout la Chine, voire à terme la Russie.

Seminar – Zachary Mondesire « South Sudan and the Politics of Region-craft »

We are very pleased to announce CEDEJ Khartoum next Seminar on « South Sudan and the Politics of Region-craft » by Zachary Mondesire, on Thursday 19 July- 11 am

 

The seminar will focus on the new nation of South Sudan and what it now means to be South Sudanese in Africa. First, Zachary Mondesire will draw from his MA thesis that outlines the ideologies of racial difference that circulate in Juba defining relationships between South Sudanese themselves as well as with others from the region, whether northward to Khartoum or southward to Nairobi. These ideas emerged from three months of ethnographic research in 2017 in a modest hotel in Juba that operated as a site of refuge during the still-ongoing civil war and hosted Africans of multiple nationalities (Eritreans, Somalis, Ugandans, and South Sudanese of multiple backgrounds). Thinking through the linkages that his interlocutors made between race and national identity led him to ask (1) how Arab positionality, Khartoum, and Sudan continue to be relevant in South Sudanese political community and (2) given the multi-polar racial thinking of his interlocutors that envisions a racial and political geography much broader than the nation-state, what other forms of political community exist beyond the nation-state and towards the idea of multi-state region and how can his research account for them? The second piece of this paper is the conceptualization of Zachary Mondesire’s dissertation research project that will attempt to answer these questions.

Zachary Mondesire is a Ph.D. student in the Anthropology Department at the University of California – Los Angeles. His research focuses on South Sudanese journalists, politicians, and intellectuals in Khartoum and Nairobi, exploring how they think through regional belonging, race, and political community between East and North Africa.