CALL FOR PAPERS – International conference “Borders and territorial reconfigurations in the Middle East and the Sahel”, Aswan – January 30th-31st, 2017

CALL FOR PAPERS

International conference: “Borders and territorial reconfigurations in the Middle East and the Sahel”

Aswan, January 30th-31st, 2017

ca2278d9-d137-4a97-a06c-ab8bb2c691bf
Poster for the South Sudan referendum in 2011

« This Middle East forged in the clash of arms and disdain of its peoples is now crumbling before our eyes. This historic disruption is not the result of the contestation of borders, though they are unfair, but the consequence oftheir fate being reclaimed by the peoples concerned”.

Jean Pierre Filiu, « Les Arabes, leur destin et le nôtre » (The Arabs: theirDestiny and Ours), p.23, La Découverte, Paris, 2015.

Continuer la lecture de CALL FOR PAPERS – International conference “Borders and territorial reconfigurations in the Middle East and the Sahel”, Aswan – January 30th-31st, 2017

PUBLICATION – Soudan – La CPI et le crime de génocide : Manoeuvres politiques et statut des minorités au Darfour, par Philippe GOUT

Soudan – La CPI et le crime de génocide :
Manoeuvres politiques et statut des minorités au Darfour

par Philippe GOUT

Article publié sur le site de Noria, think tank et réseau d’experts en relations internationales

Cette enquête (en anglais) porte sur l’échec de la Cour Pénale Internationale (CPI) au Soudan. En se focalisant sur le Président soudanais Omar El-Béchir afin d’obtenir son arrestation, l’action de la CPI et les manœuvres politiques autour de la qualification de génocide, ont eu des effets dramatiques sur la catégorisation des minorités au Darfour.

De ce travail se dégagent trois conclusions majeures :

Continuer la lecture de PUBLICATION – Soudan – La CPI et le crime de génocide : Manoeuvres politiques et statut des minorités au Darfour, par Philippe GOUT

Séminaire – De Bangui à Khartoum, une migration de crise?, par Khadidja MEDANI, le 28/03/2016

Le lundi 28 mars 2016, Khadidja MEDANI a présenté au CEDEJ les premiers résultats de son travail de terrain auprès des migrants centre-africains à Khartoum.

On Monday 28 March, Khadidja MEDANI has presented in CEDEJ her findings from her fieldwork with Central-African migrants in Khartoum.

Khadidja medani - 28-03-2016By Khadidja MEDANI:

Student in a Master 1 in Geography at the University
Panthéon-Sorbonne, I am on a fieldwork about the Central African
community in Khartoum. The border between the Central African Republic and Sudan has always been porous and the Central African’s presence in Darfur is old. However, the migration of Central African in Khartoum seems to be more recent and linked with the troubles since the putsches of François Bozize and Michel Djotodia. This small community has still a low visibility and has not been studied since now. I focus my study on why and how they left the Central African Republic and came into Sudan. I try to find which networks lead them up to Khartoum and help to their integration. I also ask the question of the status of these migrants. This last point reveals a link between the refugees and the students. Actually, the main network for the Central African
to integrate them in Khartoum seems to be the International University of Africa. ◼

?????????????

Vignettes tirées de la bande-dessinée « Tempête sur Bangui », de Didier Kassai, La Boîte à Bulles/Amnesty International, 2015.

OFFRE DE STAGE – Stage de Master-2 de recherche de terrain sur les migrants soudanais CEDEJ Khartoum/Triangle GH

Dans un contexte européen de forte médiatisation du phénomène migratoire, la collecte de données scientifiques permettant d’éclairer la question est un impératif pour les chercheurs, les travailleurs humanitaires et les concepteurs de politiques publiques. A partir de ce constat, le Centre d’Etudes et de Documentation Economiques, Juridiques et Sociales (CEDEJ) de Khartoum et l’ONG Triangle Génération Humanitaire se joignent pour proposer un stage niveau master 2 de recherche de terrain sur les migrants soudanais.

Continuer la lecture de OFFRE DE STAGE – Stage de Master-2 de recherche de terrain sur les migrants soudanais CEDEJ Khartoum/Triangle GH

Conference – Several presentations on Sudan in « Writing Women’s Lives Conference » in School of Foreign Service in Qatar (Georgetown University), March 20th-22nd, 2016

Writing Women’s Lives Conference


Day 1 – March 20th, 2016

9:00 AM
Registration

9:30 AM
Panel 1: New Paradigms & Approaches

Andrea O’reily, York University, Canada
Aint I a Feminist? Matricentric Feminism, Feminist Mamas and Why Mothers Need a Feminist Movement/Theory of Their Own

Mervat Hatem, Howard University, USA
Contesting Canonical Representations of Women’s Lives: the Case of `A’isha Taymur (1840-1902)

Continuer la lecture de Conference – Several presentations on Sudan in « Writing Women’s Lives Conference » in School of Foreign Service in Qatar (Georgetown University), March 20th-22nd, 2016

Our researchers / nos chercheurs

Coordination of CEDEJ Khartoum : Dr Jean-Nicolas BACH

Email : jeannicolas_bach@yahoo.fr

Since 2011, CEDEJ Khartoum has supported several visiting/Sudanese researchers and students. The nature of this support varies, and is based on the request, on the evaluation of the dossier presented and on the resources available.

Depuis 2011, le CEDEJ Khartoum a apporté son soutien à plusieurs chercheurs et étudiants de passage ainsi qu’à des chercheurs et doctorants soudanais. La nature de ce soutien est variable, et est déterminée en fonction de la demande formulée, de l’évaluation qui est faite du dossier présenté et des ressources disponibles.

Visiting researchers and students

Chercheurs et étudiants de passage

Currently/recently:

  • Katarzyna (Kasia) Grabska, PhD, social anthropologist. Senior Research Fellow at the Global Migration Centre of the Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies in Geneva. She received her PhD in Development Studies/Anthropology from the Institute of Development Studies (IDS) at the University of Sussex, UK. Her research focuses on gender, generation, youth, displacement, refuges, return, and identities. For her PhD, I analyzed social transformations in the context of forced displacement and return among southern Sudanese refugees. She is particularly interested in intersections of power, gender identities and gender and generational relations in forced displacement situations and the impact of (forced) migration on youth. Recently, she has been developing a strand of work around narratives of displacement and refugeness, and urban displacement. Prior to entering academia, Kasia worked and researched in the humanitarian field on issues of human rights, migration, and refugees in Guinea, Cambodia and Vietnam. She then moved in Egypt where she engaged in research among urban refugees. Consequently, she carried out research in Lebanon, Ghana, Kyrgyzstan, Sudan, and South Sudan, refugee livelihoods, access to rights, social transformations and displacement, and adolescent girls’ migration in the Middle East and East Africa. Kasia used visual media, feminist methodologies, and participatory methodologies in fieldwork. Since 2002, she has been carrying out a longitudinal study of gender relation transformations among Nuer from South Sudan in Egypt, Kenya, South Sudan and in Khartoum. She recently completed a three year long research analyzing adolescent girls migration and displacement in Sudan. Grabska published widely in academic journals as well as has made documentary films. Her most recent film was made in collaboration with a team of researchers and filmmakers, and is called Time to look at girls: migrants in Ethiopia and Bangladesh. She is the author of Gender, Identity and Home: Nuer repatriation to South Sudan (2014) which received the Armory Talbot Prize in 2015 and co-editor of Forced Migration: Why Rights Matter? (2008).
  • Azza Ahmed Abdel aziz – Azza Ahmed Abdel Aziz holds a Ph. D in Social and Medical anthropology gained in 2013 from the department of Sociology and Anthropology, School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London. Her research interests focus on cultural understandings of health, which largely feature an exploration of the interface between such understandings and bio-medical configurations of health. Dr. Aziz’s work focuses on how different individuals and groups access health on a continuum ranging from therapeutics based on cultural beliefs to those based on scientific epistemologies. She has in-depth experience working on these issues among southern Sudanese and South Sudanese individuals and groups of people displaced in Khartoum whose lives have been subject to experiences of movement/migration in different forms. She has also worked with victims of torture in London.
  • Hind Mahmud Youssef –  Hind Mahmud Youssef has been studying food technology at Jezirah University. However, her research interests has evolved: she obtained a master degree at Ahfad university on gender studies (she wrote her master thesis on the socio-economic impacts of fistula in Sudan). She is currently a Phd student on development studies with a gender perspective at Ahfad University for Women. She is also contributing to our research programme METRO 2 SOUDAN.
  • Nadine Rea Intisar Adam – Since 2014, she is Ph.D Candidate at the International Max Planck Research School on Retaliation, Mediation and Punishment (REMEP), based at the Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology in Halle/Saale, she is also a member of the LOST (Law, Organisation, Science and Technology) research group at University of Halle-Wittenberg. Her doctoral dissertation project is: « Gender and Art in the Quest for Peace. Women’s Involvement in Peace Building and the Role of Art in Peace Processes in Sudan ».

Continuer la lecture de Our researchers / nos chercheurs

PUBLICATION – Complications in the classification of conflict areas and conflicts actors for the identification of ‘conflict gold’ from Sudan, by DR ENRICO ILLE

CEDEJ Khartoum is pleased to announce Dr Enrico Ille’s recent publication :

Complications in the classification of conflict areas and conflicts actors for the identification of ‘conflict gold’ from Sudan

 

This article discusses a recent call to include gold from Sudan in the ‘conflict gold’ category of global supply chains. The call reacts to Sudan’s protracted violent conflicts, as well as a recent surge in gold mining that became of essential importance for governmental policies after most of the country’s oil reserves were lost with South Sudan’s independence in 2011. The extension of gold mining in areas with violent conflicts, so the call’s demand, requires due diligence concerning gold from Sudan and an extension of sanctions to conflict actors benefiting from it. On this basis, the article reviews critically the contradictions that arise from the convention to both define territorial conflict areas and collective conflict actors, and connect due diligence to case-by-case assessment, representing an attempt to concomitantly advocate human rights and preserve investment opportunities. Further complications arise from contradictions between state sovereignty and international humanitarian law, as well as the complexities of violent conflicts whose causes cannot be readily identified and targeted. The author argues that this results in numerous ambiguities of situation assessments and planned interventions, which have to be acknowledged if unintended negative consequences are sought to be reduced.

Published in:

The Extractive Industries and Society, Volume 3, Issue 1, January 2016, Pages 193–203

On the topic of gold mining, see also Jérôme Tubiana’s recent article in Foreign Affairs : https://www.foreignaffairs.com/articles/chad/2016-02-24/after-libya-rush-gold-and-guns  ◼

Conference – « Tradition in Sudanese modern architecture – EXPO 2015:The Pavillion of the Sudan »

« Tradition in Sudanese modern architecture – EXPO 2015:The Pavillion of the Sudan » by Prof. Davide Longhi and Prof. Sandro Grispan of the IUAV University of Venice.

Conference in Khartoum on Sunday 6th of March 2016,  at 7:00 pm.

Venue: Sudan Hall, First Floor of the Main Library of the University of Khartoum, Nile Avenue entrance. ◼

 

Films screenings & debates – « DAYS OF HOPE » in CEDEJ Khartoum

In order to further promote academic exchanges, CEDEJ Khartoum is launching a series of documentary films screenings and debates.

In recent years, several documentaries dealing with key themes of interest to CEDEJ Khartoum – Sudan, the 2011 separation, migration issues, the Arab world, etc. – were produced. The content of these films, the approach chosen by the director, as well as the use of video in relation to academic research, are all topics of interest for our PhD students and researchers.

We were pleased to organize our first screening (01/03/2016):

“DAYS OF HOPE”,

by the Danish director Ditte Haarlov Johnsen

 

“DAYS OF HOPE” (2013, 74 min) – Every year thousands of Africans leave their families behind and risk their lives in hope of a better life. “Days of Hope” brings us close to these people, providing an inside look at the struggles these emigrants face.

Dr Kasia GRABSKA and Dr Azza AZIZ, anthropologists with interest in migration issues, lead an after-screening discussion of the film.

PUBLICATION – Identity and Lifestyles Construction in Multi-ethnic Shantytowns: a case study of Al-Baraka community in Khartoum, Sudan, BY DR MOHAMED BAKHIT

This research investigates the processes and dynamics of identity formation in multi-ethnic communities in shantytowns in Sudan’s capital Khartoum. Recent studies suggest that in Sudan, conflicts are influenced by ethnic identity struggle at the national level between Arab ethnic groups versus African ethnic groups including also all other bilateral cultural divides (e.g. Muslims/Christians, Arabic language/local languages). The main aim of the research is to specify the different kinds of identities (e.g. ethnic, urban, class) that individuals and groups adopt as well as the reasons for this adoption. The theories and approaches used in this study include structural-functionalism, the historical approach (New-Marxism), and the situational/circumstantialist approach. I mainly use the situational/circumstantialist approach to explore and analyze the phenomenon. The research is based on intensive fieldwork, following day-to-day life of people, and on grounded theory method to analyze and interpret the processes of identity formation in Elbaraka area in Khartoum. ◼

100_2302 100_2839

PUBLICATION – Seing Dubai in Khartoum and Nouakchott: « gulfication » on the margins of the Arab World, by Armelle Choplin and Alice Franck

Seing Dubai in Khartoum and Nouakchott: « gulfication » on the margins of the Arab World, by Armelle Choplin and Alice Franck

 

Published in December 2015 in:

Cahiers des IFRE N°2 – 2015 / L’Afrique dans la globalisation

Les grands changements planétaires et leurs conséquences économiques et sociales s’illustrent de façon massive dans l’espace africain. Qu’il s’agisse de la vulnérabilité face au changement climatique et des défis sociétaux de la gestion soutenable de l’environnement, des profondes mutations dans l’utilisation des ressources et des espaces, des voies de la mondialisation et de ses effets sur les cultures et les langues, dans tous ces champs les terrains africains sont des laboratoires pour les sciences humaines et sociales.

Dans ce numéro des Cahiers des IFRE, ont été regroupés des articles ou des textes élaborés récemment sur ces questions par les chercheurs, chercheurs associés et doctorants des Instituts français de recherche en sciences humaines et sociales que nous avons la chance d’avoir en Afrique : en Tunisie, au Maroc, au Soudan, en Éthiopie, au Kenya, en Afrique du Sud et au Nigéria – ainsi qu’en Chine. Ces articles contribuent à montrer que l’Afrique ne se tient nullement à l’écart des processus de globalisation en cours mais, au contraire, y prend une large part. ◼

PUBLICATION – La mort animale rituelle en ville Une approche comparée de la « fête du sacrifice » à Istanbul, Khartoum et Paris – Par Alice Franck, Jean Gardin et Olivier Givre

Alice Franck, Jean Gardin et Olivier Givre ont récemment publié « La mort animale rituelle en ville Une approche comparée de la « fête du sacrifice » à Istanbul, Khartoum et Paris » dans la revue Histoire urbaine, Animaux dans la ville 1 – 2015/3 (n° 44)

RHU_044_L204

 
Résumé:
En examinant de manière comparative le déroulement et les enjeux du sacrifice musulman dans trois contextes métropolitains différents, cet article interroge la place de la mort animale rituelle dans l’espace urbain, à partir d’exemples ethnographiques issus d’enquêtes de terrain réalisées lors de la « fête du sacrifice » en 2014. Les exemples d’Istanbul, Khartoum et Paris traduisent des perceptions, des pratiques et des gestions à la fois distinctes et comparables d’un événement rituel simultanément associé à la tradition religieuse et confronté à de profondes transformations au sein de sociétés urbanisées et globalisées. Qu’il relève d’une forme de normalité rituelle (Khartoum), d’une pratique jugée « déplacée » (Paris) ou encore d’une pratique à la fois domestiquée et controversée (Istanbul), le sacrifice en ville s’avère tout à la fois un enjeu spatial et social, économique et politique. Il offre un observatoire privilégié des représentations plurielles et croisées de la place de l’animal (et de sa mort) dans les espaces urbains.
Abstract :
This article adopts a comparative approach to study the processes and the key issues involved in the Muslim practice of sacrifice in three different urban contexts. In doing so, it questions the role of ritual animal death in the urban context, based on ethnographic examples taken from fieldwork studies conducted during the “feast of the sacrifice” in 2014. The examples of Istanbul, Khartoum and Paris illustrate different but comparable perceptions, practices and management of a ritual event simultaneously associated with religious traditions and faced by deep transformations in urban and globalized society. Whether it refers to a ritual normality (Khartoum), to a practice judged “misplaced” (Paris) or both a domesticated and controversial practice (Istanbul), sacrifice in the urban context is both a spatial and social issue, economically and politically. This paper gives a comprehensive overview of the many representations of the role of the animal (and its death) in urban contexts. ◼
Istanbul
Istanbul
Soudan
Khartoum
Paris abattage
Paris
Paris
Paris

 

SEMINAR – “Interaction between health Institutions in knowledge and medical practices in South Kordofan/Nuba Mountains“, BY MARIAM SHARIF

On Sunday 31st January, Mariam Sharif presented in CEDEJ her M.A. thesis “Interaction between health Institutions in knowledge and medical practices in South Kordofan/Nuba Mountains“

This research focuses on nurses as one of actors who adopt knowledge and medical practices through their interaction with other health practitioners and health institutions in plural medical system. This interaction has been traced through nurses’ process of learning, getting tools and working under the conditions of complex emergencies in South Kordofan.

This research was aiming:

– to deploy qualitative methods (participant observation, narrative interviews) in order to elucidate the interaction of nurses in different health care systems and institutionalized medical knowledge and practices,
– to analyse the challenges for building public health services in conflict and post-war areas, and
– to probe the question how health services can facilitate non-violent social interaction and non-violent contest over resources.  ◼

October-2010-Heiban Town
On this picture: the researcher with two nurses drawing a map of health services.

SEMINAR – « Marriage Strategies and Social-Spatial Identity Reconfigurations in Khartoum (Amarat)”, By PETER MILLER

On Wednesday 27th January, Peter Miller hold his first seminar in CEDEJ Khartoum.

Peter Miller Seminar

Peter Miller, masters student in Social Sciences at the University Paris VIII, presented a case study from his research “Marriage Strategies and Social-Spatial Identity Reconfigurations in Khartoum (Amarat)”, his fieldwork having been carried out with the support of the CEDEJ over the last 3 months.  After the presentation we organized a round-table discussion on the analysis of his data.  ◼

CEDEJ Khartoum