Archives par mot-clé : Migrations

Netsereab Andom’s participation in « The Regional Workshop on International Migration from the Horn of Africa to Sudan and from there Onwards »

Netsereab Andom, PhD student at the University of Khartoum and associated with CEDEJ Khartoum, recently presented a paper in « The Regional Workshop on International Migration from the Horn of Africa to Sudan and from there Onwards ».

Continuer la lecture de Netsereab Andom’s participation in « The Regional Workshop on International Migration from the Horn of Africa to Sudan and from there Onwards »

Ester Serra Mingot’s PhD research on « Transnational Social Protection. How Sudanese migrants in the Netherlands and the United Kingdom and their families in Sudan make use of social protection, locally and transnationally »

CV_picEster Serra Mingot

title/affiliation: PhD Candidate at the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences in Maastricht University

 

In Sudan, CEDEJ Khartoum will support her fieldwork. Continuer la lecture de Ester Serra Mingot’s PhD research on « Transnational Social Protection. How Sudanese migrants in the Netherlands and the United Kingdom and their families in Sudan make use of social protection, locally and transnationally »

CEDEJ Khartoum’s research activities on migration

In 2015 and 2016, CEDEJ Khartoum particularly invested in migration issues through different scientific events and the support of several researchers/PhD students’ fieldwork in Sudan.

 

IMG_9604A scientific conference, organized by CEDEJ Khartoum, CFEE in Addis Ababa and the University of Khartoum entitled “Migration and Exile in the Horn of Africa: State of Knowledge and Current Debates” was held in November 2015 in Khartoum: for two days this major event brought together about forty researchers specialized in the field of migrations in the Horn of Africa.

♦♦♦

picture-115Dr Catherine Wihtol de Wenden is a renowned specialist on migration.

During her visit in CEDEJ Khartoum, we screened the documentary « Time to look at girls: migrants in Bangladesh and Ethiopia »(directed by Marco Speroni, 31 minutes – 2015), produced and researched by Katarzyna Grabska, Nicoletta Del Franco and Marina De Regt.

Affiche-film2

♦♦♦

  • Dr Katarzyna Grabska’s field research on patterns of return and displacement movements of South-Sudanese en route to Sudan/Ethiopia as a result of the civil conflict in the South.

In January 2016, CEDEJ Khartoum organized the book launch of her book « Gender, Home & Identity: Nuer repatriation to Southern Sudan » (James Currey, 2014) at the University of Khartoum.cover photo

♦♦♦

  • Film screening/debate about migration in March 2016: “Days of hope”, by the Danish director Ditte Haarlov Johnsen

“DAYS OF HOPE” (2013, 74 min) – Every year thousands of Africans leave their families behind and risk their lives in hope of a better life. “Days of Hope” brings us close to these people, providing an inside look at the struggles these emigrants face.

Dr Kasia GRABSKA and Dr Azza AZIZ, anthropologists with interest in migration issues, lead an after-screening discussion of the film.

♦♦♦

« The border between the Central African Republic and Sudan has always been porous and the Central African’s presence in Darfur is old. However, the migration of Central African in Khartoum seems to be more recent and linked with the troubles since the putsches of François Bozize and Michel Djotodia. This small community has still a low visibility and has not been studied since now. I focus my study on why and how they left the Central African Republic and came into Sudan. I try to find which networks lead them up to Khartoum and help to their integration. I also ask the question of the status of these migrants. This last point reveals a link between the refugees and the students. Actually, the main network for the Central African to integrate them in Khartoum seems to be the International University of Africa. » – Khadidja Medani

♦♦♦

  • Miralyne Zeghnoune’s ongoing fieldwork on Sudanese migrants in France and in Sudan.

Miralyne Zeghnoune, a master student, is currently collecting data on Sudanese migrants’ conditions in France (migratory route, reasons for leaving, future projects, connections with the family in Sudan, etc.). After two-month fieldwork in France (Paris, Lyon, Calais), she will study in Khartoum these migrants’ family and entourage (initial project, administrative procedures, contacts with the migrant, etc.).

♦♦♦

  • Alice Koumurian’s fieldwork on Syrian migrants (after 2011) in Khartoum.

Undeniably, the phenomenon of the increasing flow of Syrians coming to Sudan, resulting from the closing of the Turkish border coupled with the facility of entrance to Sudan due to the fact that they do not need a visa to enter Sudan and permission of stay is not unduly complicated, also requires the collection and analysis of data.

♦♦♦

 

Book launch – “Gender, Home & Identity: Nuer repatriation to Southern Sudan”, By Dr Katarzyna Grabska, on Jan. 21st, 11am – at UofK

On January 21st, at the University of Khartoum, Dr Katarzyna Grabska  presented her book « Gender, Home & Identity: Nuer repatriation to Southern Sudan » (James Currey, 2014).

This book launch was organized with the support of CEDEJ Khartoum and the University of Khartoum.

DSC_0684

Gender, home and identityHow and where did returning Nuer refugees make their ‘homes’ in South Sudan? How were gender relations and identity redefined as a result of war, displacement and return to post-war communities? And how were those displaced able to recreate sense of home, community and nation?

During the civil wars in Southern Sudan (1983-2005) many of the displaced Sudanese, including many Nuer, were in refugee camps in Kenya and Ethiopia. In the aftermath of the Comprehensive Peace Agreement, they repatriated to Southern Sudan. Faced with finding long-lost relatives and local expectations of ‘proper behaviour’, they often felt displaced again.

This book follows the lives of a group of Nuer in the Greater Upper Nile region. The narratives of those displaced and those who stayed behind reveal the complexity of social change and show how this has impacted on state formation in what is now South Sudan and, in particular, the crucial yet relatively unconsidered transformation of gender and generational relations.

Katarzyna Grabska is a research fellow with the Department of Anthropology and Sociology of Development and a project leader with the Global Migration Centre at the Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies in Geneva. She is co-editor (with Lyla Mehta) of Forced Displacement: Why Rights Matter? (Palgrave 2008) and author of numerous articles and book chapters. She is an affiliate of French Research Centre in Khartoum (CEDEJ) and Ahfad University for Women in Omdurman.◼

 

MIGRATIONS – Dr Catherine WIHTOL DE WENDEN in Khartoum

On November 14th, CEDEJ Khartoum has organized a documentary screening, followed by a discussion with the renowned Researcher specialized on migrations issues, Dr Catherine WIHTOL DE WENDEN.

picture-115 Dr Catherine WIHTOL DE WENDEN holds a Ph.D. in political science from Sciences Po. She is a regular consultant for the OECD, the European Commission, UNHCR, and the Council of Europe. She is the Chair of the Research Committee on Migrations of the International Society of Sociology since 2002; she is a member of the Commission nationale de déontologie de la sécurité from 2003 to 2011; she is a member of the editorial boards of Hommes et migrations, Migrations  société, and Esprit. She is a lawyer and a political scientist. Her research focuses on the relationship between migrations and politics in France, migration flows, migration policies and citizenship in Europe and in the rest of the world.

For her visit in CEDEJ-K, we screened the documentary « Time to look at girls: migrants in Bangladesh and Ethiopia »(directed by Marco SPERONI, 31 minutes – 2015), produced and researched by Katarzyna GRABSKA, Nicoletta DEL FRANCO and Marina DE REGT.

« Time to look at girls: migrants in Bangladesh and Ethiopia »

Based on research funded by the Swiss Network of International Studies, Girl Effect Ethiopia, Terre des Hommes, University of Sussex, UK and the Feminist Review Trust

The increasing number of girls who move to cities is a momentous global change
Why are adolescent girls migrating and what happens to them?
How are their families and close ones affected?
What are the constraints and opportunities linked to migration for adolescent girls?
Bangladesh and Ethiopia are two examples of countries where girls’ independent migration is on the rise. This film explores the circumstances, decision-making, experiences and consequences of migration for adolescent girls in Bangladesh and Ethiopia. It is based on a research project “Time to look at girls: adolescent girls’ migration and development” (January 2014-December 2015), that explores the links between migration of adolescent girls and economic, social and political factors that trigger their movements. It shows the agency and choices being made by adolescent girls in their diverse migration experiences.

More migrants move within their own country or region than migrate to Northern countries. Bangladesh and Ethiopia have been experiencing increasing high rates of the migration of adolescent girls to work. In Bangladesh they are found for example in garment and other manufacturing industries; working as maids; or in beauty parlours. In Ethiopia, migrant girls are mainly escaping early marriages, seeking better living conditions, or aspiring to continue their education. Most of them take up paid work as maids or sex workers.

The film is based on four parallel stories about the trajectories of migration of adolescent girls in Bangladesh and in Ethiopia. In Bangladesh, the film portrays Lota and Sharmeen who are employed in garment factories. In Ethiopia, the documentary follows the lives of Tigist and Helen, two internal migrant girls, who end up in sex work. This beautifully shot film provides space for the powerful voices of the migrant girls who speak about their own circumstances, experiences, dreams for the future.

Breaking away from the dominant focus on girls as victims of trafficking, this film gives evidence of the resilience, creativity and agency of young migrants girls who faced with difficult choices.

The documentary screening was followed by a discussion, in the presence of Katarzyna GRABSKA*, with  Dr Catherine WIHTOL DE WENDEN.

We also had the great pleasure to have with us Dr. Hassan EL HAJ ALI, Dean of the Faculty of Economic and Social Sciences in the University of Khartoum.

 

*Dr Katarzyna GRABSKA is a Project Coordinator at the Global Migration Centre. She holds a BSc in International Relations from the London School of Economics and an MA in International Affairs and Conflict management from the Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies. Her research interests focus on inter-linkages between conflict, forced displacement, gender, generations and rights. She has received her PhD in Development Studies/Anthropology from the Institute of Development Studies (IDS) at the University of Sussex, UK. Her research focuses on social transformations in the context of forced displacement and return among southern Sudanese refugees. She is particularly interested in intersections of power, gender identities and gender and generational relations in forced displacement situations and the impact of (forced) migration on youth.