Archives par mot-clé : Seminar

Special Roundtable Monday 3 September – Contemporary History of Sudan & South Sudan – with Willow Berridge, Harry Cross, Cherry Leonardi, Alden Young

Dear all,

We are very pleased to invite you to a discussion on the contemporary history of Sudan and South Sudan with a special Roundtable

 
Sudan – South Sudan History Since 1956
Recent Trends
with
Willow BERRIDGE (PhD)Newcastle University
Harry CROSS (PhD candidate)Durham University
Cherry LEONARDI (PhD),Durham University
Alden YOUNG (PhD),Drexel University
Monday 3 September
5 pm – CEDEJ Khartoum
Willow BERRIDGE is a historian of the 20th Century Islamic World, with a particular interest in Sudanese history and the dynamics of Islamist ideology. Her early research focused on policing and prisons in 20th century Sudan. It compared colonial, nationalist and Islamist penal ideologies and policing strategies, exploring important continuities and disconnects between each of three.

Her first book, Civil Uprisings in Modern Sudan, was inspired by her experience of living in the country during the Arab Spring. She was curious as to why the debates about civil protest and authoritarianism in the Middle East and North Africa region overlooked Sudan’s proud record of having been the only country in the region before 2011 to have witnessed civil protests that facilitated a transition from military rule to parliamentary democracy. In particular, the book responded to post-2011 debates about the respective roles of Islamism and secular ideologies in the Arab Spring by highlighting the extent to which ‘Islamist’ or other religiously-orientated groups were willing to collobarate with secularists within the student unions and professional associations that led the protests.

She has recently published (Cambridge University Press) a book on the controversial Sudanese Islamist Hasan al-Turabi. The text explores a number of important themes related to broader analyses of Islamist ideology: charismatic leadership (and its limitations); Islamism as a fusion of Western and Islamic ideologies; Islamism as ‘post-colonial’; the important of local political contexts in shaping religious ideology; and Islamist concepts of the Islamic state, democracy and jihad.

Harry CROSS is a PhD candidate at Durham University. His research focuses on the role of banks in Sudan after independence and until the nationalisation of Sudan’s private banking sector in 1970.

Harry is especially interested in the relationship between financial power and political power in Sudan, and interactions between local economic pressures and wider transformations in global political economy.

Cherry LEONARDI is Associate Professor of African History at Durham University and works primarily on South Sudan and northern Uganda. Her research has focused on local-level state formation since the nineteenth century: she is the author of Dealing with Government in South Sudan: Histories of chiefship, community and state (2013). Her current research projects include work on boundaries and land governance, witchcraft and security and access to energy/fuel, and she is also co-director of the South Sudan Museum Collections network.

She is currently planning new research on the history of forests, hunting and conservation.

Alden YOUNG is a political and economic historian of Africa. He is particularly interested in the ways in which Africans participated in the creation of the current international order. Since 2014, he has been an assistant professor in African History and the Director of the Africana Studies Program at Drexel University. He received his Ph.D. in 2013 from Princeton University. He then served for two years as a Dean’s Mellon Postdoctoral Teaching Fellow in the Department of Africana Studies at the University of Pennsylvania.His first book published by Cambridge University Press (Africa Series) Transforming Sudan: Decolonisation, Economic Development and State Formation, 2018 offers a historically grounded account of policymaking in postcolonial Africa. It challenges social scientists’ common perception of the post-colonial African state as rapacious and predatory with institutions that serve little other purpose besides patronage and legitimation. In the place of this narrative, he argues that Sudanese policymakers and officials like their peers across the decolonizing world believed in the potential of the postcolonial state to solve social questions in the public interest.

Alex De Waal gave his book Transforming Sudan advanced praise: « Today, a technocratic, economistic vision of a modern Sudan is a half-remembered dream. Alden Young’s superb book – a combination of political economy and cultural history – brings into focus the important but neglected story of how the country was once a model of planned development, led by an elite of Sudanese and British economists. »

In 2017 he published an article in Humanityentitled: “African Bureaucrats and the Exhaustion of the Developmental State: Lessons from the Pages of the Sudanese Economist,” which uses Sudanese journals to demonstrate how developmentalism gave way in Sudan to austerity.

Seminar – Zachary Mondesire « South Sudan and the Politics of Region-craft »

We are very pleased to announce CEDEJ Khartoum next Seminar on « South Sudan and the Politics of Region-craft » by Zachary Mondesire, on Thursday 19 July- 11 am

 

The seminar will focus on the new nation of South Sudan and what it now means to be South Sudanese in Africa. First, Zachary Mondesire will draw from his MA thesis that outlines the ideologies of racial difference that circulate in Juba defining relationships between South Sudanese themselves as well as with others from the region, whether northward to Khartoum or southward to Nairobi. These ideas emerged from three months of ethnographic research in 2017 in a modest hotel in Juba that operated as a site of refuge during the still-ongoing civil war and hosted Africans of multiple nationalities (Eritreans, Somalis, Ugandans, and South Sudanese of multiple backgrounds). Thinking through the linkages that his interlocutors made between race and national identity led him to ask (1) how Arab positionality, Khartoum, and Sudan continue to be relevant in South Sudanese political community and (2) given the multi-polar racial thinking of his interlocutors that envisions a racial and political geography much broader than the nation-state, what other forms of political community exist beyond the nation-state and towards the idea of multi-state region and how can his research account for them? The second piece of this paper is the conceptualization of Zachary Mondesire’s dissertation research project that will attempt to answer these questions.

Zachary Mondesire is a Ph.D. student in the Anthropology Department at the University of California – Los Angeles. His research focuses on South Sudanese journalists, politicians, and intellectuals in Khartoum and Nairobi, exploring how they think through regional belonging, race, and political community between East and North Africa.

PhD Seminar – Practices of social control and construction of public authority : comparative perspectives from Lagos to Khartoum, by Lucie REVILLA

On Thursday 20th April 2017, at 1 pm, Lucie REVILLA, a French PhD student at Sciences Po Bordeaux University, will present her PhD research in CEDEJ Khartoum on:

« Practices of social control and construction of public authority : comparative perspectives from Lagos to Khartoum »

Continuer la lecture de PhD Seminar – Practices of social control and construction of public authority : comparative perspectives from Lagos to Khartoum, by Lucie REVILLA

SEMINAR – « Marriage Strategies and Social-Spatial Identity Reconfigurations in Khartoum (Amarat)”, By PETER MILLER

On Wednesday 27th January, Peter Miller hold his first seminar in CEDEJ Khartoum.

Peter Miller Seminar

Peter Miller, masters student in Social Sciences at the University Paris VIII, presented a case study from his research “Marriage Strategies and Social-Spatial Identity Reconfigurations in Khartoum (Amarat)”, his fieldwork having been carried out with the support of the CEDEJ over the last 3 months.  After the presentation we organized a round-table discussion on the analysis of his data.  ◼

SEMINAR – « Fieldwork on Islamism: Methodological Issues », By Dr STEPHANE LACROIX, ON JANUARY 12TH, IN CEDEJ Khartoum

CEDEJ Khartoum was pleased to receive on January 12th, 2016 Dr Stéphane Lacroix, for his seminar « Fieldwork on Islamism: Methodological Issues ».

DSC_0678DSC_0677Dr Stéphane Lacroix is an expert on the Arab World and holds a PhD in political science. He is currently a professor at Sciences Po University and is equally affiliated to CEDEJ Cairo as a senior researcher. His research primarily focuses on political authoritarianism and on the resistance it generates, on social movements and on the relationship between Islam and politics in the contemporary era. Islamist movements lie at the heart of his research, both from the sociological perspective of mobilizations and that of intellectual history. His authoritative fieldwork sites are Saudi Arabia and Egypt.  ◼

Olivier Mongin: Urban Seminars Series Second Edition

Olivier Mongin presented a paper entitled « The city of flows, the two sides of globalization » during a seminar held at the Sharjah Hall the 24 of February in Khartoum and organized by the CEDEJ in collaboration with the Faculty of Economic and Social Studies, the Faculty of Architecture, the Faculty of Geography of the University of Khartoum. The seminar, translated from french to arabic, by Dr Azza Ahmed A. Aziz (SOAS – University of London),  was followed by a rich exchange between Mr Mongin and the audience of students and professors in presence of presence of Dr Hassan El Hajj, dean of the Faculty of Economic and Social Studies, Dr Gamal M. Hamid, dean of the Faculty of Architecture, Dr Ahmed El Faig, Dean of the Faculty of Geography, Dr Alice Franck, coordinator of the CEDEJ-Khartoum, Dr Ibtissam Sati, Deputy dean Faculty of Economic and Social Studies.

Olivier Mongin aims to demonstrate that globalization is not only an acceleration and intensification of exchanges of people, goods and information but it is first an anthropological change toward a mainly urban way of life. Such a change demands first one measure the current global turmoil. The developing countries now represent 95% of the world’s urban growth. Nine hundred million people live in what we refer to the historic city, when more than one billion live in favelas, slums and other illegal cities. Two more billion are living in contemporary urbanizations, a collection of diffuse cities, infinite cities, dispersed towns, etc. The city has thus been diluted but also more widespread. Olivier Mongin stresses the need to be aware of the stakes of this transformation of the urban experience by highlighting three major trends worldwide: flows tend to prevail over the places, especially with the Internet and the development of fast transport; urban diversity is declining everywhere, the privatization of life and public space is increasing.

For a better understanding of the urban element within globalization, Olivier Mongin relies on personal trips, readings and diverse artistic experiences hence developing an original analysis of the modalities of this supremacy of flows over places. From this perspective, he outlines a number of reflections linked to a paramount consideration of context and environment, including  the ecological, but also addressing issues of democracy and urban governance.

Olivier Mongin is a famous French essayist and philosopher. He was the director of the journal “Esprit” for over 20 years. Alongside the direction of this journal Olivier Mongin equally conducts publishing activities in various collections focusing on societal issues, philosophy and town planning. He has published books on different topics especially about democracy, the concept of “laughter” and about the city during the time of globalization.